Monday, April 10, 2017

Launch Week 10: It's Time to Launch

What do you think of the idea of your students learning about marketing and then marketing what they make? Thinking back on the book as a whole, do you see an area of your curriculum where your students can make something and utilize the LAUNCH cycle? As you're moving forward with your use of the LAUNCH cycle, connect to other people reading this book on Twitter using the hashtag #launchbook. And be sure to check out all of the resources at the end of the book

This is the last week of the winter book club. If you have not already done so, register for the book club by completing this registration form. This is how we get your contact information so we can send your PGP documentation at the end of the book club. If you're not sure if you did register, I would suggest registering again. Please note -- even if you've registered for and participated in another eLearning book club in the past, you will still need to register for this one. I will send out PGPs around April 19th, so please have all your comments made by the 18th. I will post a note here next week after I have sent out PGPs and also to announce the summer book club selection. 

100 comments:

  1. I can't believe this is the final chapter already! This book has been an awesome read that was filled with some challenges but was also filled with a wide range of opportunities for me to use in my Cadet Teaching class as well as the school library. This book has made me think outside the box and think of ways to create a makers space in the school library and in my class. I absolutely LOVED this book because of the ease in the explanation of the LAUNCH cycle. The FAQ and Lesson Plan sections at the back of the book were awesome! My summer months are going to be spent in utilizing this information in creating LAUNCH projects for the next school year!

    I have to admit that Chapter 10 made me feel a little nervous. This final phase scared me a little too! How am I going to get my students to send what they have created to an audience? This phase is not just finishing or presenting a product to a classroom. It's much more than that!

    Time To Launch! is marketing. How am I going to get my students to think about marketing? I need to get my students to think about their product and find people to think about their product as well. I need to instill in my students the process of reaching out to the right people....that is what marketing is all about.

    The author explained that marketing isn't usually something students learn in school. However, he provided seven reasons why they should learn it. These seven reasons were so inspiring. This is why I need to get up the courage to teach my students what marketing is all about.

    After finishing this book, I do see a few areas where my students can make something and utilize the LAUNCH cycle. For instance, my cadet teachers create a classroom game for their respective classrooms. This would be an awesome opportunity for me to begin and utilize the LAUNCH cycle. I am beginning to think of new ideas for the next school year. For instance, I am thinking about a Design a Classroom, Design a Bulletin Board Activity, and Design a Math Manipulative Project along with a few others. By using the LAUNCH cycle with these projects, the students will have additional opportunities to learn more and not just complete a project. As the author said, I need to expect MORE from my students!

    Finally, after reading about the 2016 Global Day of Design, as the school librarian, I will participate in the 2017 Global Day of Design. If you have not done so check out the website. It is full of ideas to LAUNCH this day. I am planning to sign up my library and participate in it. I am planning on setting up a makers space in my library for the next school. I am planning on making a major impact on my students next year by using the LAUNCH cycle!

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    1. I agree that the 10 weeks with the book has gone by quickly.
      I'm going to look more into the Global Day Design as well. I thought it seemed interesting and fun!
      I'm excited for you that you have found a way to use the book and make an major impact with your students! Good Luck!

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    2. Thank you so much! Hope it works well with you and your students too!!!

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  2. I like the idea of marketing with students. It seems to me that it would be easier to accomplish with older students. Time is still a concern for me as I only see my students once a week for 40 minutes. While reading the book, I've thought that music composition would be the easiest place in my curriculum to use LAUNCH.

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    1. I agree with you. I meet with young kids for a limited amount of time. I am also concerned on how to fit it into my curriculum.

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    2. I agree that introducing marketing would work better with older students. I am not sure how I would introduce it to my Kindergarten students.

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  3. Initially, reading that the focus of launching the product is essentially “marketing”, I too, like the author John, was a little uneasy. I too, am a creative type that felt that “selling looks disingenuous, and like selling out” (Ch. 10). As a middle school and former high school teacher, I see that many of my projects throughout the course year have missed this launching and marketing phase, and this is part of the reason why maybe some of my students went through the motions of the project but weren’t really proud of what they accomplished. The marketing phase, to me, is what shows students that what they are doing in the classroom are authentic skills that can be related to the real word-marketing is that connecting piece to show students that what they do and what they learn in my social studied class connects to life outside my classroom. I think one of the reasons why older children get tuned out of school is because they are constantly being asked to complete tasks and these are tasks that they do not see as being relevant to their future careers. However, I think the marketing phase of the project eliminates this disconnect because it not only helps students develop valuable persuasion and argumentative skills, but shows students how even as students they can impact an audience, inspire others, and make a difference. Like the text said, if my students create projects that educate the world on a humanitarian issue, environmental issue, or about people within their own community, they have created something that can help others, and “promoting it is actually an act of service”. Furthermore, the skills developed in marketing that the authors’ described are definitely vital to future success. They need to understand sometimes they will fail (rejection) and that it takes determination and guts to present an idea to a group of people (courage). The LAUNCH! Method, and particularly the launch/marketing final phase, could easily be integrated into my curriculum. Firstly, I am incorporating the Genius Hour, or 20% time, the authors described in the book during my homeroom time with my middle schoolers. In this project, students will have the ability to spend time working on any project that they choose about any subject that they choose, and how they will share it with the world. An example is one of my students wanted to learn more about autism because one of her cousins is on the autism spectrum. She identified the “marketing” phase by realizing that not very many of her peers know or understand what autism is, despite that there are many autistic students on our academic team. This quest to learn more about her cousin has transformed to a series of videos she is going to share with our academic team to serve as an information session on autism. In terms of my standard geography/social studies curriculum, I too believe that the LAUNCH method can be used within each unit of study. Each unit students examine the environmental issues and humanitarian issues. When we studied the Middle East, students studied the water crisis there. My students were captivated by this issue-to many of them, it was something they were very concerned about. However, when they created projects that described what they believed would be a good solution to this water crisis, they simply turned in their ideas to me and the rest of the world never saw them. In the future, I think this project would benefit from the LAUNCH method. I think my students and I could work together to figure out who should learn about their ideas for solutions-whether it be politicians or people within our community so that our city could learn to conserve water. I truly see more areas of my curriculum where I can use LAUNCH than I can begin to describe. I thoroughly enjoyed this book and feel that it is already improving my teaching.

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  4. Learning about marketing and sharing their products give students an incentive to do their best if they know that their work will be viewed by others. It also brings a dose of reality that not everything will be 'marketable'. Corporations spend years and hours of manpower changing their products to make them better. This is a real lesson that students can learn early. I have a student who has started sending his writing to publishers: he doesn't seem deterred by rejection letters. For him a response from a publisher on their letterhead (probably duplicated to thousands of people) is gratifying to him. Sometimes he receives feedback, sometimes, not. This is also a reality of how the real world receives and manages some phases of marketing.

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    1. I agree with you about kids doing their best when they know that their work will be viewed by others. I think it's important, though, to make sure that it's not a competition, especially when the kids are young. I find that this happens a lot, so a creative solution to make this a positive, encouraging environment would be great.

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    2. I love the fact that your student was brave enough at a young age to even send his writing to a publisher! I'm not so sure I would have been willing to do this as a middle school or high school student. The idea of being able to get feedback and responses at this age are a great connection to the real world.

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  5. As a whole, I like the idea of students learning about marketing. I agree with the authors when they state that marketing in general, is widely misunderstood. If you believe in your product, it's easy to sell it to an audience, it doesn’t take much work, and you can be successful at doing so. BUT, if you are not confident in your product, there would be less of a chance for an audience to buy what you are trying to sell or persuade them one way or another. Every year my students have a fundraising opportunity for our program and we sell jar recipes that my students make. This year, we sold less than we have in years. I think this is partially due to the fact that we have so many new 6th graders that didn’t know much about the jar recipes (whether they tasted good, or how they were made) and partially, because we put them out so late in the fall. If we worked with our 6th graders and new students to try our jar recipes and teach them the social skills to sell the jars, I believe they would have been more successful. Over the course of this school year, we have made 4 out of 7 jar recipes and all of the students enjoy making and eating them, and in turn, when it comes to the fundraiser next school year, our sixth graders will be able to sell the jars because they know and believe in the product.
    Thinking back as a whole, I believe there are many areas of the life skills curriculum where I, and my co-teacher, would be able to add the Launch! Cycle to our teaching. Many wonderful ideas have been brought to my attention, not only by the text, but my colleagues in this book study. It has been an amazing opportunity to read everyone else’s struggles and inspirations of how they could use this in their current teaching style. For my end of the year unit in science, I am going to be focusing on plants; how they grow, parts of a flower, and growing food to eat. I would like to initiate the Launch Cycle with my students during this unit, and teach them the different steps. Ultimately, I would like my students to learn about different foods they can grow and create a recipe from food that is grown. I think the Launch design cycle is a great way to integrate different elements of design principles into teaching all students in any area of curriculum.

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    1. Student buy in with your fundraiser is such a great idea, and practical way to get students engaged in the marketing process, I love it! I can quickly, off the top of my head, think of a handful of ideas that I could use that approach with in my schools. Great ideas!

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    2. Like you discovered, it definitely makes sense to know your product when selling it. You've given a good example of this. The students that had tried the recipes before selling them, sold more since they were able to give an honest opinion of the product. It was interesting to hear what happened with your newer students that hadn't sold as many. It sounds like you have a plan to avoid the same thing from happening again next year!

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  6. I am an elementary STEM teacher, this is my first year in that role. Everything in this book lends itself to exactly what I'm doing in the classroom. I have several ideas for launch projects that I am going to implement before the end of this school year. I loved this book so much, and can't wait to figure out how to spread my love to elementary classroom teachers so they can continue to foster this mindset in their regular education classrooms.

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    1. Yes! The Launch cycle would be perfect to use in a STEM classroom; the ideas and practical applications suggested in this book will go hand-in-hand with the projects that your students will be exploring.

      Fostering the mindset in others to use in their regular education classrooms will be refreshing as well. Good luck ;)

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    2. We have just implemented a STEM class in the Middle School and I believe this book will be beneficial for my colleagues to read. I see the kids in the 7th and 8th grade STEM class thinking outside the box and enjoying a different type of learning compared to the core classes. I believe the other classes can also get their students more innovative and to use more inquiry in their lessons. I can't wait to share at the next meeting. As teachers we should always be excited to hear new ways to reach the students and make an impact on their educational journey!

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  7. I really love the idea of the launch cycle and as I've been reading I think of more and more ways that I will be able to incorporate it into my curriculum. I honestly wish that all of my colleagues would read this as well because I think that so many of our students would benefit from this and it would just be great for all classrooms.

    I cannot wait to start incorporating all the ideas, tips, and tricks that were outlined in the book. And of course all of the great ideas I've gotten from this book club! Thanks to all!

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    1. I'm thinking the same thing. I am actually going to try and convince two other teachers in my department that teach the same class as me to join me in this journey. They are very open to improving our units. I hope you get a few more teachers on board. It's much better to have people to bounce ideas off of when they are going through the same experiences as you.

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  8. I could see how the marketing idea would work well for high school and middle school students. I think a teacher would have to be more creative about marketing for the younger elementary grades.
    over all I like the idea because I could see how a student might find some hidden talents through the marketing they did not know they had within themselves. I do think that many of the students would be very fearful of the marketing aspect due to a more reserved personality. But over all I think the students could gain confidence through the marketing phase.
    I like how chapter 10 talks about students experiencing authentic success when their work reaches an audience by giving them real world work to do.
    I have a large project at work coming up that I need to tackle. I will be designing a new course for my program. I'm sure there will be lots of revising going on. I plan to use ideas I gained from the book in the process.

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    1. I love you idea on how it may bring out some hidden talents that the students didn't even know they had!

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    2. I never really thought about it bringing our "hidden talents" within students. It is a great way for students to find their strengths and branch out a bit. It gives students more of an opportunity to be creative.

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  9. I believe using the Launch Cycle is a possibility in every classroom. It doesn't matter what the subject, knowing how to market various projects/products is important. It is easy for kids to forget about the "audience" and I believe this to be vital to the success of the product. Basically, something to consider before one ever begins. The example of walking on the moon really hit home with me. I was 7 years old and my mom had my brothers and I watch it on TV. I have often thought about the importance of that over the years. That specific event has not really developed much in my lifetime, but the book talked about the hope that it gave to the American people. Hope for dreams, exporation, and believing that anything is possible. When students or adults grow in creative confidence good things are bound to happen. The phrase, "The world needs more awesome, and what you made is going to make that possible" is an encouraging quote to share with our students. I believe the fear of the unknown is a natural feeling in most areas of a student's life, however, rejection often times can spur the inner instinct to work harder bringing about bigger and better ideas. The author also mentions service to others, isn't that, along with empathy, what would make our world and the future a brighter place for all to live. I thoroughly enjoyed this book and am beginning to implement small parts into my classroom.

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    1. I love that quote: "The world needs more awesome, and what you made is going to make that possible." I also agree that fear is a natural feeling, but I also believe that we all need to step out of our comfort zones in order to make those awesome things happen. That's when we learn the most!

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    2. I love that quote too! I wrote it down! I want to put it on my bulletin board so the kids see it everyday!

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  10. I think I have mentioned this earlier, but one year my second graders read a story about a group of kids who made hats for cancer patients. My group of kiddos wanted to know what they could do for others. I LOVED that they wanted to help others. It was Spring, so Easter was right around the corner. We brainstormed and decided to make Easter cups out of small styrofoam cups. We had to talk about cost of our supplies, how much to sell them for, and what we would do with the money. I think the process wouldv'e gone much smoother if I would've known the LAUNCH cycle back then. But, it was spur of the moment and we ran with it. We worked as a small assembly line to make 100 Easter cups and filled them with donated candy. They were decorated with little marker faces complete with pipecleaner ears, and a cotton ball tail. We decided to sell them for 1 dollar. To my surprise all 100 sold out in the first morning! So, we went back to the supply closet and made 100 more. Long story longer, we eneded up selling 500 Easter Cups the first year! They decided to split the money between a southern Indiana school that was destroyed in a tornado, and the Humane Society. It was a very proud teacher moment. I know they learned a great deal with this, and so did I. They worked on posters to hang, and wrote up messages to read on the morning announcements. As school started the following August I had the new second graders tell me what they wanted to do as second graders. The overwhelming answer.....make Easter Cups. We sold them for 4 years in a row and they continued to be a big hit. Now that I'm in the library I may have to think of a new project and use LAUNCH to put it all together.
    I have really enjoyed reading this book, and appreciate all of the stories that illustrate the points so well. Great read!

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    1. The Easter cups are such a cute idea and a great way to incorporate the LAUNCH cycle with younger kiddos. I teach preschoolers, and at times, this cycle seems way over their head. I love the practical way you put it into practice, and I love how they chose to use the profits. So sweet. :)

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  11. After reading the authors' point of view on marketing, I am in support of teaching it to students. It's a necessary 21st century skill for students since they are in a consumer society. They need to be educated consumers who can see marketing from an ethical perspective. Also, they need to be able to launch their products to add even more value to all they have created. Without launching the product, I think students would view it as just another project. Also, if they've put so much research into a product, an audience, and the author steps in the LAUNCH cycle, I can see students wondering why they don't get to share it. I think that any opportunity students get to share their awesomeness with the world makes for a wonderful learning experience!

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  12. I like the idea of marketing in the classroom. I think having the students learn about marketing will help them in other areas of school as well as questioning if the advertisements they see on tv are being deceptive or honest. The lesson plans at the end of the book made it feel more plausible to use in my classroom. Next year, I am hoping to include this from the beginning. Being at the end of the school year as well ISTEP testing, we hardly have any time for the students to get any kind of lesson. This book has really inspired me to let the students explore and create more in the classroom. Also making the lessons no matter what they are over, relevant to their lives and important to them. I know it won't always be the ideal setting but trying to include those might spark a new idea or career for a student.

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    1. Kelsey I think one of the big take aways for myself is what you mentioned above....that we always need to make learning relevant to our student's lives! I think that this point alone makes learning fun and enjoyable!

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  13. I am sad for this to end but looking very forward to upcoming book clubs! I love to read but I usually push it to the back burner, except for my personal choices! I am veyr excited to try more of the marketing aspects that are in this chapter but again it comes down to time management. However, I have gained many new ideas from this book that are going to be "Launched" very soon. One of them is to interview different staff memebers in the building according to their interests and then design project to report back to the class. For example, our principal is from Kansas. Many students have chosen to interview her about the state, some what to do an activity about Wizard of Oz, some what to explore the color green, etc, We will see where this takes us!!!

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  14. I think the idea is fantastic. The best thing about this LAUNCH book is the fact that it is step by step of how to see a product from the beginning to the end. I liked that very much. I believe it is important to market a product because the students must see the positives and negatives in a different light than just themselves desiring a finished product. They must learn to see the item they have made through another’s eyes and this is a valuable tool for sure. They have to learn to think as a buyer of the product, advertising, what would set them apart and many other facets other than they just ‘made this to be done with a grade’. I think it would help greatly in productivity. I have heard of and would some day like to attempt and open air market of handmade items that one might see in a market in small villages in Mexico or Central America. I think this would be really fun and the opportunities for creativity, use of Spanish, marketing skills… and I am sure ‘revision!’ would have to all take place in order to be successful at the market. I would enjoy trying this. Scary, but why not LAUNCH it and take a chance… the book will help in so many ways.

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  15. This was such a great learning experience for me. I enjoyed how the author explained each step and made the LAUNCH Cycle easy to implement and modify for my primary classroom. I love the idea of marketing. It allows students to have a sense of pride and ownership in their project. When students know going into something that it will be viewed and reviewed by peers and are familiar with each step of the LAUNCH Cycle I feel that the entire process will be a great learning experience for all. The LAUNCE Cycle was easy for me to modify for my Second graders who have been working on their "Genius Hour" projects. They will be marketing in small groups this week and then will be presenting to the rest of their peers next week. I am so excited for them and they are eager to show off what all they have learned and achieved. I look forward to using the LAUNCH Cycle more in the future. I have also recommended the use of this book for our faculty book club for next year.

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  16. I have really enjoyed this book. I feel rejuvenated after each new chapter I read. I love the idea of marketing. My students have to create a car after we have discussed the design process. The students are always anxious to start this project, and they can't wait to share it with the class as well. I'd love to add more of this type of project into my curriculum.

    This book has launched many ideas that I want to use in my classroom next year. I love the idea of allowing the students to take charge more often. This will be a little difficult for me, but I'm definitely gong to challenge myself. Great book!! I have already recommended this book to several people I work with in the corporation. I'm looking forward to the summer book club!

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  17. There were some helpful tips in this book to distinguish between the recipes and the projects, allowing for mistakes, and the reward of creating something new. Blogging and reading information with specific ways to increase responsibility and ownership of a project are ways to encourage, promote, and start the process of "launching" ideas. I have a couple ideas in mind for next school and will allow time this summer to m plan how to implement the launching of those ideas.
    In physical Education, I would like the students to create their own game complete with equipment and then play the game(s). A second option would be to have them create, perform, video tape their own exercise routine or dance (music) video and publish it to You Tube.
    In Health, I would like to see the demonstration of what happens in digestion from start to finish using everyday items to represent the process. Another option may be to find a way to show how diseases destroy and weaken immune systems and how to prevent the spread of those disease.
    I know my biggest obstacle will be time. Allowing the students time to follow the LAUNCH sequence and develop a quality product. Our school is going to a new schedule next year which may allow for a bit more time in one day to develop the project and persevere. Thanks for all the suggestions through your conversations!

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    1. I love this idea of students creating their own idea game! You are good about having students create in both PE and in Health. The new schedule will for sure give more time for the students to go through the process and steps of LAUNCH. It should be interesting!

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  18. When reading the "Seven Reasons Why Kids Should Learn Marketing" section, I realized how valuable this could be to my students' successes. By studying marketing strategies and presenting their products to others, young people (middle school age in my case) learn to be critical consumers in today's world. The ability to ethically share their knowledge base, design skills, developmental process, and final product strength holds them to a higher level of accountability and motivation. Being comfortable with public speaking is a necessary skill in everyone's career and life.

    I believe that any project in my mathematics classroom can utilize the Launch cycle to make learning an exciting, innovative, and rewarding experience for my students.

    Excellent read!

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    1. I agree! I think our kids need to learn marketing strategies, especially how to ethically share their knowledge base. I think the Launch cycle takes the learning process into a process vs. a recipe which allows further learning instead of rushing through things. In return, the students are more understanding of what they have done, what they have learned and what their design is really about versus a poster board or a powerpoint. As I read this chapter, I thought of the old science fairs. Some were rushed and those that really did the science fair for the interest of science were well thought out and were able to talk forever about their project.Imagine those same science fair projects as a culmination of the Launch process. It could be an entirely different outcome when the students had time to think, process, learn, fail, adjust, continue to grow and eventually market their product. What a difference it could make.

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  19. I like the idea of children marketing their ideas/creations. I am sure something amazing has already come from this occurrence and can definitely happen again. Children are very smart and have big imaginations. With the right support, they can and often do succeed in creating wonderful things. Why not let other people enjoy and benefit from it too.

    I can see the concept of marketing fitting in with a math or history unit. I think at the Kindergarten level, we could use the LAUNCH cycle and work as a large group to create and market something. I hope this would inspire my students to work with their families at home to do something in a smaller group or individually with parent support.

    In Social studies, my students learn about children around the world. I believe we could use the LAUNCH cycle to learn more about the needs of a certain group of children, decide what to create, create it, and then get it to that group of people some how. A local church might have a missionary in one of the areas that could give us advice and go from there. I know this would be a long process and take a lot of revising, but would be worthwhile to help someone out!

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    1. I agree that children can market their ideas! I feel as if students are already very creative and want to share their creativity with the world. Why not allow them to do it while teaching them marketing? Students get to be creative and they learn marketing strategies and techniques along the way.
      I'm glad you mentioned how to incorporate marketing at the Kindergarten level as I am concerned how to introduce it to my students. My students are used to completing a whole group lesson, centers, and then completing their individual work. However, I am not sure my students would understand "marketing" or how I would even introduce it to them! I like the idea of creating something as a whole group.
      Thanks for sharing!

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  20. I can see my students using what I have learned reading this book in mamny places in my U.S. history classes. I think it would be great to use in a unit over WWII. I can see them marketing many different things but the entire campaign being support the war and here is how you can do that. They could focus on war bonds, ration books, and many more. I would leave it up to them to decide as I no longer want to give out recipes. This book has been an eyeopener for what I am asking my students to do in my classes I am ready to unleash creativity!

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  21. At first I was unsure if marketing was a necessary step, but after finishing the chapter I think it is a HUGE step! I believe a student needs to see the finished work of their project and present it to the appropriate audience! How cool would it be for them to see their authentic work get marketed/published in an authentic way!

    I do see the LAUNCH cycle being used in my classroom! I can see it in social studies doing something over countries and reading over a author/stories! I cannot wait to impliment this in my classroom!

    This book was such a great read!

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  22. I like the idea of students marketing their launch. Something that I appreciated was when the author talked about how sometimes people don't think their product is important to their audience...but in fact you would be doing your audience an injustice if you didn't launch! I have my 4th grade students paint canvases and give them to their mothers for Mother's Day. I could see them marketing them or also my 5th graders painted ceiling tiles could also be marketed for businesses. In high school someone wanted to buy one of my paintings, but I didn't because I was so attached to it. I ended up making them another painting similar to it and sold that to them. I could see students being too attached to their art work and not wanting to part with it.

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    1. I agree with you, especially about the kids getting very attached and proud of their work. I do like the idea about you having the kids painting tiles and selling them, and I think it could work if they know they are selling them and the money will go to something specific. Love the enthusiasm you have with your art classes!!!

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    2. I think artists often experience difficulty when parting with their work. Marketing has become so important when considering making art as one's living, but there are so many great outlets for doing this now, online sites like Etsy, for example. It is really great that you are encouraging your students to think about selling their work. Also, I appreciate your statement concerning times when we think that something we have created may not be important to an audience. In the past, I have created artwork that I did not feel was worthy of saving, so I would stash it away in a closet, and later, when returning to it, I would realize how much I liked it.

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  23. I am so happy that I joined this book club. I am not sure I would have set aside the time to read Launch without it. There were so many ideas that really got me thinking about my own classroom and style of engaging children. I keep trying to come up with the perfect idea to inspire my students' to get started creating. I do like the idea of marketing because I think that providing a wider audience for students really pushes the kids to improve their product and do their best.

    I can't wait to get more teachers in my building reading this book so that they can be inspired to help our students work more creatively through the LAUNCH process. I like to talk things out and bounce ideas around in that brainstorming phase rather than work alone so I need some teammates to help me LAUNCH!

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  24. I really liked the idea of marketing a product. I think it would be great to do in place of a grade in some fashion. I'm not sure how, but its something to consider. Initially I was reading the book and thinking, "how can i incorporate this LAUNCH idea in my classroom NOW" but really I think to do this successfully it takes a lot of back loading on the teacher end. Careful, precise planning would be a very intricate part to this being a good project. So I've made a goal to hopefully over the summer create a LAUNCH type project with the parts that I found beneficial for my content area and age range. I did take away a lot of information from the book, even though I didn't necessarily love the entire idea and every chapter.
    I really do love these book studies and I'm grateful for the DOE to make these available and affordable (nearly free) for teachers. Its a great way to connect with others and see that our struggles and issues are not ones we fight alone!! Thank you!

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  25. One of my favorite quotes from this chapter is, "We need more awesome in our world." It was in reference to taking the time and making the deliberate effort to have the students market their creations. Makes perfect sense! If so much time, heart and sweat was put into a product or creation, it makes perfect sense then to share it with world. It can add to feelings of validation and time well spent for students.

    Another quote in that paragraph was, "...if you spend days working on something, then the universe deserves it." Amen to that as well. Like with any great or even good idea, the final step should be to share it with the world, let them benefit from it as well, and allow the creator to see the benefits of his creation in the lives of others. I think it gives more purpose to all the work that is being asked of the students. As a later chapter says, "When we include marketing and launching into the product-design process, we send students the message that their work matters." THEY matter, too.

    I look forward to incorporating the ideas and recipes suggested in this book. Reading this has opened my mind to trying new things in my classroom, something I think both my students and I need! The move to a more "creative" vs "regulated" objectives would be refreshing and needed change. I can see this happening in three ways.

    First, I've been researching the 20% idea...that of using some class time to just allow the students to create a product or a project that is of their own making. I used to do something like this with a "Something Different" project that I've tweaked from a former teacher. This is where they choose something they want to learn and create their own project. I had great results with this in the past and I'd like to make a more concerted effort to do this again.

    I'd also like to try the launch cycle with a book that the students get to choose to read. Perhaps I could require that the book be about some issue about which they feel strongly and then allow them to create a project around that issue.

    Finally, I would like to work with a teacher in another discipline, for example a science teacher, and see if there is some kind of project we could offer that involves both disciplines. I think most teachers would be open to the idea of allowing time for students to look and listen, to ask questions, to understand a problem or process, to navigate ideas, create and highlight what's working.

    Like the first sentence of the book, I think most educators "believe that all kids are naturally creative and that every classroom should be filled with creativity and wonder." Giving students the chance to BE the change they want to see in the world...to even to begin to realize that they can be this...to begin thinking more for themselves and hearing the beat of their own drum...could be such a benefit to all. Given the opportunity, we can not only make a dent in the world, but we can BELIEVE that we are able.

    Thank you so much to everyone for the ideas, suggestions, joys and encouragements that were shared. They made a difference! Thank you also to the leaders of this blog and guiding us through making the ideas presented in this book our own.

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  26. The message for me in the Launch phase is that there is more meaning For kids when they have a bigger and more authentic audience. I see the value in this and think I can start small with finding a way to share their work with students from other schools, with parents, with authentic community service agencies.

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  27. I really love the idea of the kiddos marketing their ideas and sharing their "awesomeness" with the universe! I think this phase allows the kids to be proud of their hard work...the blood, sweat, and tears they may have poured in! They need to share it...plus this is a life long skill they will use many times over! They will also learn about rejection in a safe environment if the product isn't something that is a "good-fit" for the audience.

    How I can incorporate this cycle into my curriculum would need to start off as basic. As I have read this book I have really pondered how it fit with minimal time with 3 year-olds. I loved the box idea. I think that is where I would start. With a box of things and ask them to build something. I think watching those wheels turn is so amazing.

    Finally I really enjoyed when the author mentioned that we need a change. Our schools need a change...we need to give kids hands-on projects to prepare them for what "real life" looks like (like giving them a career ready path). His last paragraph on page 204 really hit me, "...give them the opportunities in school to do real work instead of consistently preparing them for whatever comes next." I love that especially since so many schools are test and paper driven...He's right...there needs to be a change our world is changing!

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  28. The marketing idea goes hand-in-hand with any Performance Based Learning. Our seniors are currently involved in a project to revitalize our community. They must SELL it to a panel of guests. Marketing incorporates so many ELA standards, speaking, writing clearly and effectively, arguing, counter-arguing, employing rhetoric and persuasion. Very useful chapter.

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  29. This book has been such an interesting read! I love that's it's given me new ideas for my classroom and challenged me to expect more form my students. I don't think that I've given them enough credit regarding their abilities; I've "coddled" them.
    With this last chapter I've been challenged to take my expectations even farther and ask that my students market their creations. I work in a very loving community and I look forward to the affirmation the students will receive when they finally get their work out there to a larger audience! :)

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  30. One of the things I have recently had as an option for a project was to create a children's book about the science topic we were discussing. Students had the opportunity to be creative. Not all students chose this option, but for those who did, it could definitely be published and sold. There are a lot of outlets to market student ideas. I think I just need to open up my thinking and not forget what I learned from this book. I can't wait to utilize the information in the Launch book in my classroom.

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    1. I love the idea of a children's book about science topics! I wonder if there's a way to get parents involved in this option?

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  31. I loved the "Seven Reasons Why Kids Should Learn Marketing"...1.) Its a vital life skill. 2.)Its an ethical Foundation 3.)They learn about Rejection 4.) Students develop Courage 5.)Students grow in their creative confidence 6.) Students become critical consumers of information 7.) Students become more empathetic. WOW! I will use these often in my classroom! These are all not only important to understand in the classroom but all facets of life from academics, sports, college, career, family, and more. If these get developed in more classrooms I can only imagine how much more college and career ready our students will be!

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  32. I can't wait to use the launch cycle in more ways next year. This has been a very helpful book and the blog has been equally helpful. As a teacher we always need to keep improving and this book was a great source for me.

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  33. I think the idea of marketing is an essential part of the process. I have to admit that it's a part I frequently skip. Having students market their product to an authentic audience rather than just to me is so important in building their confidence. I will definitely incorporate this more fully into my projects in the future.

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  34. I agree with fact that we do need more awesome in this world. However, I am going to be very frank, and say that I am struggling to see how to fit this process into my classroom. I clearly heard A.J. admit to being a maker; a maker of all types of products. I am not that type of a creative person. Yes, I have made many great lessons/units over the years. I make recipes, I garden, I read.....I do lots of cool and wonderful things. However, seeing how to take anything that I have ever designed for my classroom to a marketing level is not happening for me. My plan is not to give up, but to follow those using the launch cycle and look for ideas that I think will readily translate into my area of US History & Psychology. I also plan to reread the book over the summer, when I will not be so interrupted, and try to brainstorm my idea then. I am enthused about the process, and feel that I have learned so much, but just cannot step back and see it falling into place in my classroom yet. Am I the only one?

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    1. I absolutely understand your feelings here. This seems to be the most difficult step to REALISTICALLY see happening in the classroom (or I suppose, taking it outside of the classroom). But I agree that first having the inspiration is important and then the TIME. Which is of course what teachers DON'T have enough of. So rereading and planning this summer when there actually IS time is a great idea to actually put this into practice :)

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  35. I absolutely love the idea of students learning about marketing and then putting it into practice. What a valuable skill to learn especially before they launch themselves out into the real world after high school. What's also exciting about that is thinking about them doing projects starting in elementary school, middle school, by the time they get to high school they should have such a great grasp on the launch cycle and marketing that they could do such amazing things. What a valuable set of skills to learn.
    I'm out of the classroom this year but I can't wait to look over my curriculum this summer and start seeing where I can't put the launch cycle in!!

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  36. I don't see my class making a product, marketing and selling it for our LAUNCH debut, but what I can see is my class tackling some issue and trying to solve it. That could involve creating a product or creating a solution to some problem. I'm pretty excited now about having my class go through the entire LAUNCH cycle. After reading this book, I feel I have the knowledge and tools to create several great projects with the cycle in mind. I had shared some earlier concerns about the design cycle and following state standards. I just got done reading the frequently asked questions and feel better now as it states that the design projects should work as an integrated part of the curriculum. I'll have to work on this part, but it now seems much more attainable. I'd like to get the other two teachers in my professional learning community (PLC) to buy into this as well, so that we can go through this experience together and grow in this process.

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    1. I agree that if you can get other teachers that you are working with to 'buy in,' this would be a much more attainable process. You can encourage each other to keep taking risks and pushing forward. Good luck!

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    2. Elizabeth Stracener
      I agree, because my students may not be making a product, but they may be more likely to tackle a service, or issue as you mentioned. I teach science and health, so they might LAUNCH a project that relates to an issue or problem they see that needs to be addressed. This year, my health classes have made PSA videos that I plan to share with the junior high health teachers. It is LAUNCH on a small scale!

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  37. This book and blog could not have come at a more perfect time for me. I just moved classrooms because the entire school is being renovated (my old classroom literally has a 20 foot hole leading outside now). We have awesome things on the horizon in the next two years, including some things like they expressed in this book such as robotics labs, etc. But I feel like I’m at a fresh start where students and teachers both can be inspired by the opportunities around us. I feel less limited by a traditional classroom than I did last year. And as a department, we are meeting in a few weeks to update our curriculum in our current classes and create the curriculum for 2 new classes. These are perfect opportunities to utilize the Launch cycle as teachers ourselves and in turn lead our students through it.

    I will admit that at first the idea of marketing seemed unrealistic and perhaps unnecessary, but after reading this chapter, I feel the exact opposite! I’m wondering if I could have students actually design things for my new room, or design the best layouts for learning, etc. Also, we are putting into place ‘teaming’ for our freshmen next year where each student has the same English, science, and math teacher. That gives these 3 teachers the opportunities to work together when trying to Launch, mixing more than one field into a design or product, making it more realistic to life. I can't wait to try it out!

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  38. I believe there are many important lessons middle school kids can learn from a marketing project, especially the aspects of becoming critical consumers of information and developing an ethical marketing foundation. These are real-life consumer skills that last into adulthood.
    Because of the time constraints, intense remediation focus, and urgent nature of my intervention classes I am not able to LAUNCH a marketing project, although if I had a traditional classroom, I can see where it would fit in, especially in social studies or science. I do plan to use some of the brainstorming ideas for our small end of the trimester project though: brainstorming in isolation first using T charts and idea webs/pair-share then group share/having a brainstorming leader to chart group ideas on whiteboard.

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  39. I really like the idea of sharing ideas and getting quality feedback. I work with toddlers so I am not sure that this is an opportunity that they will be able to participate with. Older students need to understand that ideas are great but if you cannot "sell" your idea, it may never go anywhere. My own children have participated in great projects that follow this idea. They have created videos, print flyers and 30-60 second elevator pitches aimed at marketing different products. I also see that teachers are starting to use marketing with the goal of preparing students for future interviews by teaching students how to sell themselves. Becoming an advocate for your needs, skills and ideas can only help them become more confident when they start looking for post-school opportunities (e.g. college, work place, etc.).

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  40. Teaching students about marketing (what it is, how to do it, the affect it has on people) would be very powerful and a powerful source of knowledge. Number 1: marketing is used to sell us goods and services every day and knowing what different marketing techniques are will help us as consumers (no matter how old or young) to make wise purchasing decisions and not be ripped off. Number 2: if students understand how to market themselves or their own product, that is also powerful because that can lead them into a bright future full of many skills (public speaking, confidence, accepting rejection, etc) that we need to be very sharp on as adults.

    As a music teacher, I would be able to use LAUNCH for small - in class only - type of projects. First of all, it is MY personal experience that no body in public schools care about music. They don't help with concerts in any shape or form. They don't encourage students to even go to their own concert. One time, the Principal scheduled "Math Night" on the SAME night as my spring concert. Instead of rescheduling "Math Night" (like she should have because I had that date set since the first week of school) she encouraged all students to attend "Math Night" and said NOTHING about the concert. Big slap in the face.

    The other problem is I am always the "new person". And here where I live, instead of embracing new teachers and welcoming them into the school as part of the team, my personal experience is that I get ignored, stomped on, and God-forbid the class line up AFTER the teacher gets there, then they complain about me to my mentor and/or principal. So no I don't see myself as using LAUNCH in some big-scale life-altering way because I won't receive any help or encouragement. But perhaps someday I can do something small in class - for just us {the students and me}.

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  41. We have several marketing classes in our school, and our Economics class as well does a marketing exercise. I am going to share this book with these classes just to give them a different perspective and maybe ideas they have never thought of.
    I do not see myself using the LAUNCH in my classes. I do not know how we would market anything. I do know I will use bits and pieces of the book, the brainstorming ideas, and the feedback.
    Can't wait to see what we are going to be reading this summer.

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  42. I think the marketing step in the process is so important. Too many times, kids work so hard on a project, and then they just receive a grade and it's over. How awesome would it be for the kids to take this through the marketing phase! It's not only validating their hard work now, but it's teaching them a lifelong skill.

    I've learned so much from this book, and I will continue to incorporate many of the ideas into my classroom. I would also like to say that I've learned so much from reading everyone's comments. The comments provide a peek into everyone's classroom, and I have learned so much just by hearing everyone's ideas and struggles. Thanks!!!

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  43. Marketing is one of the most important parts we can teach our students (in full disclosure, I'm a former marketing major!). I think the students can learn so many life skills and how to market themselves for future jobs and careers!

    As for products, I think LAUNCH lends it naturally to my entrepreneurship unit, but I'd love to see it in core classes too. I love creating for an authentic audience and for it to be realistic!

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    1. Elizabeth Stracener
      I agree! I teach science and health, so I do think that I can incorporate the LAUNCH process in my classes. Tying LAUNCH in a more cross-curricular fashion would allow students to think about products/services that are not just centered around the "business" classes. We have an entrepreneurship class at my school, but I think that my science and health students could LAUNCH as well.

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  44. I'm not too sure what to think about the marketing stage. It's a lot to take in, deffiently as a special education teacher. If I were to implement this in my classroom the cycle would have to me modified greatly. I might start with just finding the audience and then adding a step throughout the year. Taking it step-by-step would be the easiest.
    As for the Launch cycle it's self I think that it would work in my classroom. It would take the time but I can see me being able to use it after we read a book. I love that it was split into steps because it would be able to split it up so that we could take our time and make sure that everyone understood each of the steps.

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  45. Elizabeth Stracener
    I really have enjoyed reading this book and reading the blog posts from all of the participants! This chapter regarding marketing was very eye-opening for me. I had not viewed marketing as an integral part of the education process across the curriculum. I have so many ideas floating in my head that can be used in my classes. I teach Biology, Environmental Science, Health, Anatomy & Physiology, and a dual-credit Biology class. I think there are many opportunities to use the LAUNCH process in any of my classes, we just have to use our creativity to find a product/process using the steps. The reasons the authors provided for the importance of marketing in all disciplines really made me think about how it would strengthen my student's critical thinking skills.

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  46. When I first started reading the chapter, I was a bit weary of teaching marketing; however, after finishing the chapter, what is there to lose if we teach it? People using these marketing skills every day, whether it is marketing a product, an idea, or themselves ( in trying to get a job, get into a program, etc.), so these skills should be taught to students. And teaching these skills using a project they created will make it more real to them. We recently finished a WWII museum, so I think marketing this to the local history center could be a great part of their project!

    I think there are bits and pieces from this book that I definitely can use throughout my curriculum, and I can see us using the LAUNCH cycle in our culminating Global Issues project at the end of the semester, where students have to find an issue, research it, then create a viable solution. I've been trying to improve this project over the years, and I think this cycle will be perfect to make a more thorough and well rounded project for students.

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  47. Introducing students to marketing their project as the final step certainly can seem daunting. It is real world and that is what our students need to the be able to compete.

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  48. I think it's neat to teach our students about marketing. I think with my young students it would have to be a class project. I love sharing it with an audience. It's gives it more of a purpose.

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  49. I have participated in all of the book reads offered by the DOE. I found this book to be the most beneficial. This was one that could be used across grade levels and did not seem geared towards elementary or secondary. I thought it could even be used with staff.

    In a residential school setting, we cannot market outside of our building, but I do think teaching our youth these skills and letting them market their product within the building can teach our kids skills that could help them achieve far beyond any potential anybody thought they could. As I finished reading this book, I thought how awesome it could be if we could do a "Launch Project" that could tie in their treatment and education program together and part of their discharge could be to market why they feel they are ready to leave. In residential they are going to slip; however, they have to find the solutions through learning -- both in the school setting and in the therapeutic setting. My mind was spinning towards solutions. I believe through professional development and collaboration through our school team and our treatment team we could make great strides by skills learned by participating in this book read.

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  50. Currently, I have a class currency (Crow Cash) that my students absolutely love! For the first time, my current groups of students had the idea to "make items" during their inside recess times to sell during our "buy days" and to split the profit among each other. I was curious to watch it unfold. Little did I know just how truly AMAZING these children are!!! Within a couple of inside recess times, I hear them beginning to "talk up" their products (hello marketing!) to their peers as much as possible. Students were extremely giddy like Christmas morning once all of our shops were open and ready for business! It was total chaos as everyone ran to their favorite shop and I loved it. The students who were selling items were even impressed themselves and were so excited to show me how much they sold and the profit that they had made.
    It seems as though I have been using "pieces" of the LAUNCH cycle already without knowing it. I can't wait to piece it all together to come up with a larger project that I am hoping grabs my students attention and has them eager to learn and create!

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  51. I think over time I will be able to work creating an item and marketing it into my curriculum. I am especially eyeing my unit on the Renaissance as an opportunity to get the LAUNCH cycle into my curriculum. I struggle with creativity and marketing, so I doubt it will go off the way I expect. However, much like the students, I will need to keep my mind open, and "improve," not "fix." Once I get the LAUNCH cycle into my class, I think it will only grow and improve from there!

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  52. I know the marketing phase is important because it allows the students' an opportunity to showcase their projects, but I will say I am very nervous about marketing outside of our communities. I do believe the marketing and last phase of launch cycle are so important for students' because they will take more ownership of their projects. Students' will put forth more effort in their assignments/projects if they know others' will see, and if they present to an audience even larger this would help them gain confidence in themselves and their work.

    I liked the idea of having my homeroom complete a launch cycle with a project of their choice, from any class/subject area. Utilizing the extra time in homeroom each day to come up with a creative project to launch. I read this idea in a previous post, and I thought this might be a good starting point for myself.

    I also could see myself planning something over the summer for my Health classes, and allowing students to design a project at the beginning of the school year to get them excited about creativity, doing something they are passionate about, and coming up with some neat ideas for the future. I think it would be helpful if I could get the other Health/P.E. teachers' to participate with me, and we could all share our ideas with each other, and our students' could compare/contrast each project (this could give us a larger audience to market our projects). I would also like to explore some of the Google apps out there to see if we could expand our audience outside of our own school as well.

    I have enjoyed reading this book, and it has really made me step back and think about the way I give assignments/projects. Students' need time to correct, revise, and resubmit to allow for more creativity and ultimately better scores on assignments and projects. Students' should revise their own work more, and teachers' should step back and "drop the red pen"! They should be correcting and editing each other's work, and developing more ideas for the future. Projects allow for creative design, and this is a very important part because students' need to understand why we made this product/design and how it will impact the world. Connecting more assignments/projects to real world problems, and/or how students can solve a problem. Our students' need to be prepared for the future, and I am prepared to develop more projects next year and to test out the launch cycle....we will see where it takes us! Thanks to everyone for your posts and comments as well!

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  53. I love the idea of kids creating and then marketing their ideas. This is the way of the world! Each year my kids make commercials using iMovie about the stop smoking campaign. I could definitely use the launch process in this project. I am looking to expand this project into creating "products" to assist with someone stopping smoking. Through this project my hope is that the kids will learn what cigarette smoking can do to the human body, at what age and why people begin smoking, how they can avoid the pressure from peers, as well as how difficult it is to quit smoking once you have begun. I believe this year we will broaden the scope by asking them to include additional information such as the effects of smoking, physiological responses in the body due to smoking, a product to help quit, and tips on how to avoid beginning to smoke cigarettes in the first place.

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  54. I think the idea of kids being able to market their own creations is fantastic. It goes back to what they said in chapter 9 with the Presbyterian school, "If school is meant to prepare students for real-life, why doesn't it look like real-life?" This idea seems like a great way to connect to a variety of real-life skills, and although it can create rejection, disappointment, and fear at times, I think it's worth teaching.

    I have enjoyed reading this book, but it is difficult for me to see how I could truly use the complete LAUNCH cycle as a preschool teacher. Many of my students are very creative, and I think it's important to start this freedom to create at a very young age. However, I only have them 6 hours a week, so time to create is a challenge. Nevertheless, I still believe that kids that are inspired to create early on are more likely to create actual inventions or products later on in life. So, even if I can be a small part of that process and plant the seed for that inspiration, it's worth it.

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    1. Mrs. Hannah, I like that quote from chapter 9. I somehow missed it. Yes, it does relate to the whole idea of marketing and what can be learned from it, even though some of those lessons are difficult.

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  55. I have enjoyed reading this book. I feel that the launch cycle helps students really think about their questions and work them out. The launch cycle helps the students learning to be more of a real world experience. I think it would be a great experience for the students if they could take their invention or product and be able to market it and see how it goes. This would help them to see successes and failures, but learn from them to make something better. I think it is great when we can take a child's learning and make it come to life. If students could see how marketing really works and not just read about it, wow! I love to be able to teach my students something that could possibly help them in their life down the road. This cycle would be something that students could find beneficial in real life situations. I think I could use this launch cycle with the third graders I meet with throughout the year. They do an invention project and I think using the launch cycle would help them to think more about their invention and if it is something someone would want to buy. The cycle would also have them spend more time on it and break parts up more, so they really thought about what would make some tasks easier.

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  56. I really like the idea of the kids learning about marketing and putting that information to use with their product. I can't even imagine the feeling of accomplishment that would be felt and surged through the group or class. Marketing one product would be a great experience and make those students well rounded in the working world that is approaching for them. It is a life skill and building the courage to participate in this project along with the possibility of rejection would be life changing for the future. We have to know how to fail, to be able to build ourselves back up and try again. I've loved this book. I am going to try to implement parts of this book in the future.

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  57. Having taught in a STEM school for 6 years, I am completely comfortable with the making and revising of launch. This marketing chapter has definitely made me think about taking things a step further to give student's meaning and purpose. I had never taking the time to consider the importance of marketing skills in my kindergarten class room, but this chapter definitely opened my eyes to the importance of that skill in today's world. I am looking forward to implementing this phase into future projects for my kindergarteners!

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    1. I never realized how important it was either until I read this chapter. Students can learn valuable marketing techniques and skills. I am also a Kindergarten teacher. I'm going to instruct students to create a marketing ad as a whole group. How will you implement it into the Kindergarten classroom? My students have trouble sitting for long periods of time and I am worried that it may be over their heads to comprehend what I want them to know at this age level.

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  58. I absolutely loved this book and I am looking forward to implementing some of the suggestions given. I like the ideas of marketing and teaching students to understand the process. It will help students promote and share their ideas and hopefully get them making projects they are confident that they will "sell". I believe most items in this book can be used across the cirriculum with a little imagination and creativity.

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  59. This was a great book to renovate my teaching methods and how I present information in the classroom.
    As a Kindergarten teacher, I am unsure of how to introduce marketing into the classroom. I think it will be something I do as a whole group. After completing the LAUNCH cycle, my class could create something as a whole group? I would love to know what other Kindergarten teachers will do.
    I think I will start the LAUNCH cycle during art in the classroom. Art allows my students to be creative and with the LAUNCH cycle, I can encourage students to be even more creative.
    This was a great experience and I am looking forward to the next book club!

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  60. I really enjoyed this chapter. I believe that having students market their product teaches them to be honest, critical and creative when trying to get their audience to see the value of the product and to consider utilizing it.
    Moreover, this helps the students to be more confident in themselves while learning the art of rejection. Not everyone will like the product and this may drive the group to make future improvements so that more people will then want the product.
    I see so many of my students being afraid to be in front of a group and fearing rejection. Designing a product and working to gain acceptance by an audience is a very valuable experience.

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  61. Teaching students how to market their project is a great way to develop entrepreneurs. Sometimes this can be a simple as teaching them how to market a lemonade stand, to get them started.

    Within the classroom, I can see application of the launch cycle in writing, social studies and science. The great thing about the launch cycle is that it is cross curricular. At some point in time during the process students are working an skills in all academic areas.

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    1. I like the idea of applying the launch cycle to writing-publishing student work. This is not something I had thought about before for my science classroom.

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  62. Marketing and getting the students to put themselves out in the public is wonderful and nerve wrecking. There are so many benefits to this and so many ways the students can grow from this experience. Besides putting on art shows within the school or submitting student work into area art shows, this chapter has me thinking about other ways to get the students work out into the public. (art sales, art blogs, etc.)
    Overall this book has given me much to think about and I am glad to have joined the club.

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  63. I was definitely skeptical about the suggestion of needing to market the "creative work.' After continuing on into the chapter, however, I could definitely see some benefits. I specifically liked Reason #4 (students develop courage) and Reason #5 (students gain confidence) on pg. 198 to support why students should learn marketing.

    I really enjoyed reading this book and the discussion with others. I struggle with the time constraints of trying to implement the launch cycle. I can see possibilities in my Geometry classes, but on a small scale.

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  64. I like the idea of students marketing what they make. Being able to present and market one's ideas to others creates a self pride in what has been created. Students put much time and energy into the LAUNCH process what better way to finish the process than to let the 'world' know what has been created! I found the 7 Reasons Why Kids Should Learn Marketing as great reasons to market their creations. All 7 of these learnings can be helpful to so many aspects of life. They are positive attributes/skill that all people need for a successful life.

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  65. I think that marketing is an important skill for students to have. They need to be exposed to having to present ideas to an audience. If it is a project that they have spent a lot of time on, it will feel as if the stakes are higher. I think this is likely a similar feeling to going on a job interview, which everyone does at some point.

    I think that there are many projects that pertain to Physics classes that can be launched. Examples: Designing and building catapults, bridges, chairs, and roller coasters.

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  66. What a great way to end the book! This chapter is very timely, as teachers in my district are working with students on performance based assessments. So often, our real world audience isn't exactly real world, and it is exciting to see so many educators in my district truly offering the experience to publish and present to community members and beyond.

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  67. I am convinced that marketing to a real audience would make a huge difference in how my students look at a project. This is a fantastic idea and I need to look into it. Where I’m struggling is in having an idea of what my beginning students in Spanish could do with the grammar and words that they are working with. Sure, I could have my middle schoolers, who are playing with greetings and goodbyes and numbers go and do something for younger kids in the elementary. However, this is not an appropriate activity, say, for an intermediate student practicing the future and conditional tenses. I would like some ideas of how this could fit in for those students. They are not going to do translations for people. Everyone just goes to Google Translate anyway. So what could they do that’s real, for a real audience? I would love love love for them to find something engaging. We live in a rural community where there is no visible Hispanic population. Besides sending them on mission trips with their churches, where do I go from here?

    This book really makes me think and I am glad to have had the opportunity to read it and participate in the discussions.

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  68. Is there a summer book study? If so, do you know the time frame yet? Thank you.

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  69. Where do I look for more information about summer book club for PGP points?

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  70. Hello! I have the summer book study information, but I can't find my PGP points email for this book study. Is there a way to get another copy of the PGP's earned? Thanks. This book has been amazing.

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