Monday, March 13, 2017

Launch Week 6: Understanding the Information

What does student research look like in your classroom and with your students? What types of research are your students doing? After reading this chapter, do see new opportunities for student research in your classroom? Or are you modeling different types of research? It will be very interesting to see the answers to these questions considering we have participants teaching a variety of different grade levels and subject areas, along with administrators and media specialists.
 
Next week we will read and discuss chapter 7, "Navigating Ideas."
If you would like to get a late start in the book club, that's fine. Just be sure to comment on every week's blog post. I know a few people have had problems commenting to the blog and also signing up for email alerts. If you have problems, please try logging in from a different network (if you have problems at school, try from home and vice versa) or try commenting from a different account. If you still have problems, please contact me (Meri) at carnahan@doe.in.gov. You might also check with your technology staff. Here are some other details about the book club:
  • A prompt or question will be posted here in the blog every Monday morning. That blog post will also include the reading assignment for the following week.
  • To receive notifications when posts are made, click Join this site or Follow by email in the bar to the right.
  • If you don't already have one, you will need to create a Google account using your first and last name. If you already have a Google account, ensure that your first and last name are set in your profile. (Log into Google, click on your picture in the top right corner, click on My Account, then on Your personal info.) This will ensure that when you enter a comment in the blog your identity is clear to other participants. 
  • Respond to our post and/or respond to a comment by another participant each week. The more interaction there is between participants, the richer and more beneficial the conversation will be.
  • In addition to the amazing connections and powerful learning of being in the book club, participants who make a meaningful contribution to every week's discussion will be awarded 20 PGPs.
  • If you have not already done so, register for the book club by completing this registration form. This is how we get your contact information so we can send your PGP documentation at the end of the book club. Please note -- even if you've registered for and participated in another eLearning book club in the past, you will still need to register for this one. 
  • If you would like, connect to other people reading this book on Twitter using the hashtag #launchbook.

113 comments:

  1. After reading this chapter it helped for myself to tie together some ideas in my classroom about the LAUNCH cycle. I think that I do allow my students time to explore and sift through their questions, but I personally want to do this more! For my kindergarteners, we do a lot of research through reading. Most of them read at a very low level so many of times it is me reading to them and we sifting through their questions together as a class. We do, do exploring data some. My students do know how to read a bar graph and if we've reading informational texts or in math we definitely take the time to go through things like this slowly and seek out all answers. I think the thing we do the most is hands on research. For instance, right now we are learning about money in math. My students were very curious as to what a penny looked like and why the nickel is bigger than the dime even though the dime is worth more. I've taken this time to let them explore and sift through these answers by using coins and collaborating together.

    We don't do a lot of researching online as my students would find this very hard.

    The thing that really got me curious was the interviews. So much can be learned from an interview. I think that I completely forgot about using this. I think that for myself as a teacher its important to bring in guest speakers and let students interact with them and ask and answer questions. Also for a writing standpoint they could interview someone and write about them. We are definitely in the early stages of writing, but each of my students does have an idea and loves the opportunity to get to put them on paper.

    I also wanted to note that I just don't send my kindergarteners off to do and explore. We have A LOT of modeling that happens before they are allowed to explore on their own, interact in their groups, etc.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is awesome to see your reflection on what research looks like and what it can be for kindergartners rather than saying that it cannot be done.

      Delete
    2. I struggle with research in the younger grades, and appreciate your ideas and insight. It's a great idea to think about researching together. I can totally start there. Thanks for the suggestion!

      Delete
    3. One of my first reactions to this chapter is that we don't do a lot of reasearch in kindergarten. But you are correct, we do many of the same things in my classroom that you mentioned, and it IS research. Modeling and researching together is key at this level. They have to learn what research looks like in order to do it on their own. We are laying the foundation.

      Delete
    4. I like the idea of doing research together and modeling how to research. I teach first grade and it is a struggle to try to have them do this on their own. Doing it together will help them learn the steps and it's a great foundation.

      Delete
    5. I think it would be cool if research for all ages could be outside sometimes, but it just isn't always possible. I think kindergarten would love researching an area outside, but I can see where teaching research to the younger students would be challenging due to recording their findings.

      Delete
  2. In the school library students do have amble time to explore and research. However, after reading this chapter, I realized that the majority of the research done in the library is with books and a computer. I understand that research does involve reading a book, but research can be much more than that! This chapter reminded me that multimedia resources are out there and should be utilized for research. When researching, I need to get my students to begin thinking critically and understand their topic on a deeper level. This chapter helped me to open my eyes and look at research in a different way.

    I became VERY interested in the "interview" form of research. I am beginning to think of ways to use members of our community to aide in this area of the LAUNCH cycle. Students can personally ask questions to an expert in an area. Our school system is located in Whiting, Indiana and BP is located in our backyard! I am thinking of contacting BP to ask if employees would be interested in helping to make an "interview" process a reality. This process may also lead into a hands-on type of research. I am really excited today after reading this chapter to begin the LAUNCH cycle in my library. I am beginning to think of project ideas as we speak!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Its so hard for me to image what research would be like with Kindergarten age since I teach high school. I found it interesting to read your comments about what you are doing with that age group in the classroom. :) I too some times forget about interviews even though interviews are a great primary source. I need to do more with interviews as well.

    ReplyDelete
  4. In the alternative school setting we are not currently doing research, so I do not have much to share with the group on what we are doing with research. But I am looing forward to seeing what others are doing, and hope to try to borrow a few of your ideas that might work in my current setting.
    As I was reading chapter 6 I marked some notes in the book. I like what it says on page 110 that children are already researching before they read. I never really thought about it like that before, but they naturally ask tons of questions, so I see how that is actually true.
    On page 111 I like how the book says it's good to sometimes just be a sounding board for the students to bounce ideas off of without solving it for them.
    On page 115-116 where the book talks about avoiding the rigid research trap... I have a question. If we abandon some of the specifics what does the rubric look like for grading the research project??? Anyone already doing this that has a rubric they can share? Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We are in the same situation you are to an extent. Research is a bit difficult for us too because we have to be careful with our computers and limit what our kids have access to in regards to sites. We do have to depend on books and actually select the sites for them due to security issues. We can utilize interviewing to an extent but it is often limited to the staff that works here.

      Delete
  5. At the middle/high school level it is important not to let the few who abuse the resource of the internet keep us from letting the majority who can be responsible use it to its full measure. When my district first adopted 1:1 devices five years ago, there were many fears about what students would find. I have sometimes used the curating suggestion of providing a short list of sites; this reduces time that students might spend wandering around the internet and narrows the focus without eliminating some amount of freedom. Having my own children at this stage of education has helped me have multiple perspectives. Learning how to be responsible is a part of each one’s education. We want students to be responsible; and sometimes they have to be given some space and freedom in order to mature and learn about setting their own limits using some guides that we provide.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Tammy, our school also moved to 1:1 with iPads. Whenever I ask the students to do a little research to find an answer or for a paper they are writing, I am always so worried that the first thing they'll go to when they have a chance to open their iPads is Snapchat, Instagram or a game. Some do...and I was talking with a colleague about how that cannot constantly be monitored, and in fact, that's often what we (as adults) do too! It may not be Snapchat but I often check my email or Pinterest or even Facebook when I have time. It happens. My students and all of us just have to learn to deal with the constant call of other things. I like your idea of providing a list of websites to use. I've done this too with research projects and have found good success with this. I agree, sometimes they need a little space and freedom, like we all do, to learn about setting limits and using guides.

      Delete
  6. In science, I teach a unit about animals. At the end of the unit, I have the students tell me an animal they would like to learn more about. I give them a set of questions to answer to guide them as they research. I have them go to the library and check out picture books to research their animals. Lastly, they compile their information and present it on a poster they make at home. However, after reading this chapter I think I might take the children to the computer lab a few times during the unit to research the animals we will discuss. Also, I might ask them what they would like to know about their animals, instead of just giving them questions to learn what I want them to know. I might also vary the project by letting them make a model of the animals and share the facts, from their research, about their animals.

    I like the author's idea of having a parent volunteer help in the computer lab, for extra assistance, as the research takes place, especially since I work with 5 and 6 year olds. In addition to using online resources more, I might try to set up a skype conversation with my class and a zookeeper to gain even more information about the chosen animals.

    Since I teach Kindergarten, I think it would be a great idea to model the research process online and using books, before I expect my students to do it. I am sure they will get more out of the research process by seeing how it is done first.

    ReplyDelete
  7. My first response was to think that we do not do research in early childhood. Then I remembered the story the author told about his son and the graphing project. While we may not use complex technology, toddlers and preschoolers are still learning about how the world works. We talk about plants that grow, count how many people think different animals are the best (cats, dogs, snakes, etc.), and explore the world around us. When I think about it, this is research too. If nothing else, it is the foundation of inquiry that they will need to fall back on when they encounter complex topics in their future.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lynn I teach kindergarten and I thought the exact same way at first, but then I realized that we do, do a lot of this, but we do a lot of it together. Younger students still have questions and they still can answer them, but they have to learn how to do it. I do a lot of guiding and whole class conversations!

      Delete
    2. I love your response...I have taught kinder in the past but currently teach 3 year-olds...I also thought the same thing that this research couldn't be done with such little ones...how wrong I was...Taking their wonders and fostering them and helping them discover the answers in so many "simple" things is just the beginning to this LAUNCH process....I love the idea that we are building a foundation to discovery and inquiry!

      Delete
    3. You guys are some of the first people to help those little minds. How awesome you help them to discover so many things!!

      Delete
    4. I am so happy I read your response! I teach Kindergarten and just posted that I think it is difficult to have my students complete their own research. However, we do all of the things you mentioned in kindergarten! The only difference is we do every thing as a whole group. Students only complete activities independently or with a partner during centers. Otherwise, we complete our research and discussion as a whole group. I know understand that we are paving the road for students to use higher order thinking skills in older grade levels.

      Delete
  8. Incorporating research in my classroom is quite easy and so my French students are lucky in that respect. We do all kids of research. My students research cultural topics, recipes, countries, fashion designers, "landmarks, tourist attractions, the list can go on because there is just so much information out there for students to discover when you teach a world language. I could see how it would be difficult for other subjects or grade levels to do this in their classrooms, as well as trying to work out a computer lab schedule if they're not 1:1. Even though my students have a lot of opportunities to research, after having read this chapter I really feel like they're only exposed to one way of doing so. They google it! I need to incorporate other ways such as the interviewing process. I love this idea, and I think it'd be such a great opportunity for my students to speak/hear the language, as well as practicing a new form of researching.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I feel the same way as you. With my ASL class we do research so much. I think I could do a better job of letting them "research" different ways.

      Delete
    2. I cut your response so I would be able to find it and it ended up on my post too. I apologize.

      Delete
    3. "Google it" does seem to be the first response of my students too. However, listing other alternatives, especially interviews, has helped them find alternate resources.

      Delete
    4. I agree. "Google It" is overused, to say the least. I was very excited to see alternative forms of research. Our students live on Utube, watching videos. It makes perfect sense to have them use that as a productive source of educationally sound information. Meeting them where they live will result in less time trying to get around the assignment to play on the internet.

      Delete
  9. I learned a lot of new ideas from this chapter! Research doesn’t have to be a headache, and many of the types are easy for many different types of students to achieve. In the past year, my math classes used interviews to ask their classmates their favorite type of food for a graphing activity on their Chromebooks. Otherwise, research in our room, sometimes looks a little different. Many times, we stick to Youtube videos to answer our students questions, they may have about whatever subject we are learning about at the time. We are currently teaching our students how to utilize their Chromebooks better, in order to find information on Google or Kiddle.
    After reading this chapter, I want to work with my co-teacher and our paraprofessionals, to get our students to “research” more independently, using the different types that the chapter listed. Reading is often difficult for my students, but that doesn’t mean that they don’t find different ways to answer their questions.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I also learned a lot about research from this chapter. For instance, that research is more than just looking through books for information. I now think research might be a bit more fun than looking through endless books for facts. :)

      Delete
    2. I agree. As a social studies teacher, I have always had my students interview friends or family members. I guess I never considered that "research". For example, in Psychology my students interview a family member of an older generation to discover differences in teenage development now VS then. This chapter has reframed how I look at research, and made it clear to me that I can do it more, and I have been doing it all along.

      Delete
  10. My students don't do a lot of research in my art classroom usually because I do the research for them. I teach k-5 and our projects are centered around an artist of the month. This is the research that I am talking about. However, I am in the middle of doing my big 5th grade project of painted ceiling tiles. The theme for the ceiling tiles was Bicentennial of Indiana. Students had to work as a table to find visuals and also information on their topic that they chose from a selection of 60 topics. After that they had to use google docs to download images and information and share the documents with me. It was a lot of work, and they have learned a ton along the way. The hardest part of this project is working together as a team! Their hard work is paying off and they are looking amazing!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. After reading this chapter, I too realized that my students do not do much research on their own. (fellow art teacher) It is so easy to gather up visuals, artists info, examples, demonstrations, and so on when preparing a lesson to present. I am realizing that I can have the students do this and perhaps that will give them more excitement about the project and the results!

      Delete
  11. I loved this chapter, especially from the lens of a parent. I never thought about the fact that all of those questions my four-year-old asks are part of a research process.

    Info lit is my favorite thing to talk about, but I will admit that I, too, have been stuck in that formal research trap. I also appreciated the discussion on media literacy + information literacy. This chapter makes me think of the wikipedia/Google debate. Instead of having hard lines and saying "no wikipedia" for a particular task, I like to allow students to use the right tool for the job. Maybe wikipedia does have a place in our research process. I show students how to use it to get some background info so that they can come up with better search terms or synonyms to use in a formal database, as one example.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I loved that part about the kids and all their questions too. I look forward to my little granddaughter asking me questions!

      Delete
    2. Good point about Wikipedia as a starting point for a general understanding. I also encourage students, and my own kids, to search through the sources that are cited on Wikipedia. Clicking on the footnote will give you the source that serves as supposed prove of the point being made in the body of the explanation. I'll encourage students to read that source then read the Wikipedia information then determine if it is a valid synopsis. Sometimes it is not, but it is still a worthwhile research endeavor in my opinion.

      Delete
  12. I'll be honest. I don't allow my students enough time to research all of the answers to the questions they have. We research Civil War information, famous Hoosiers, simple machines, and health related topics. My students always have more questions than I have answers. I am O.K. with this too. I tell them all of the time that I learn as much from them as I hope they do from me.

    I never really thought as experiments as hands-on research until I read this chapter. I'm not sure why though, because "playing" is definitely research! We do science experiments all of the time!

    I try to move away from the typical research projects and provide an open ended research topic, but I am not as comfortable with this topic. I also want to make sure that the sites the students are visiting are safe. I feel that when I am giving them a little bit of freedom, that the students may stumble across a site I don't want them to see. I want to make sure that I am teaching the students which sites are reputable as well.

    ReplyDelete
  13. As an early childhood educator...research in my classroom may look quite different than older grade levels. I feel like in our room we are exploring more and I am teaching them to ask questions. I feel that many young kiddos have a natural ability to wonder and it is my job to foster that...I want them to keep wondering! When a child asks a question I often feel like it is my duty to help them explore that question and for them to reach an answer they are satisfied with. One day we were playing outside after it rained...The kiddos found lots of worms...I grabbed some magnifying glasses so they could take a closer look...Then the questions began coming...what are those lines on the worms, why are they slimy? Why do they wiggle when they move? All amazing questions...so we took those questions and went from there...I youtubed how worms move and we got to watch a video close up, I asked the kids to move across the floor without using their arms and legs...etc. We had a blast exploring their amazing sense of wonder...and I had a blast watching those light bulbs go off! This seems to connect to one of the authors quotes in the book, "When research is real, it doesn't feel like research, it feels like geeking out. It feels like learning."

    I loved the questions the child had in the book about the whales...and how the author let him explore his questions to see if on his own he could find his own answers...I believe that it is important to find ways to foster the kiddos research process through discovery on their own. We need to build that foundation early on...and we shouldn't "suffocate their curiosity (John Spencer...LAUNCH)

    Even at this young age you can use interviews to teach kiddos to ask questions...We always do a grandparent interview during grandparent's day...however this could be done with so many other areas such as community helpers. The power of asking questions! I remember my class having an orthodontist visit...(he was super wonderful to come) and my kids had a load of questions...but they were asked to sit and listen...their questions may have seemed "insignificant" but to them they were super important...after reading this chapter it got me to look back at this visit (obviously) and wonder...what other questions did the kids have that they weren't able to ask. As in an earlier chapter we read it said that kids are often in an environment that they are asked the questions...when it should be the other way around.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree that students need to discover and figure out the research process on their own. That doesn't mean that you are not there to guide them. It only means that it is more student led than teacher led. I think as a Kindergarten teacher, I need to give my students more independence and know that they can do their own research and find the correct answer. Thanks for sharing!

      Delete
    2. I love the idea of having your students interview grandparents on grandparent's day! I'm definitely going to use this in my classroom. I also agree that it's so important for kids to use research to "discover" answers on their own. I think the learning is authentic and so memorable when this happens.

      Delete
  14. Incorporating research in my classroom is quite easy and so my French students are lucky in that respect. We do all kids of research. My students research cultural topics, recipes, countries, fashion designers, "landmarks, tourist attractions, the list can go on because there is just so much information out there for students to discover when you teach a world language. I could see how it would be difficult for other subjects or grade levels to do this in their classrooms, as well as trying to work out a computer lab schedule if they're not 1:1. Even though my students have a lot of opportunities to research, after having read this chapter I really feel like they're only exposed to one way of doing so. They google it! I need to incorporate other ways such as the interviewing process. I love this idea, and I think it'd be such a great opportunity for my students to speak/hear the language, as well as practicing a new form of researching.

    We do a lot of research in my ASL classes. My students research people, places, culture, history, etc. The only problem I see with my students is that they use only online sources. They seem to have "forgotten" looking in books, talking to people, etc. I did a project where they had to make a tombstone for their Deaf person. When they finished they had to not only make the tombstone something creative, but they had to tell about this person. The students did a great job on this and were very creative, but they all still did the same kind of research.

    I liked the part in the book Collection and Evaluation Process where the author asks, "Which is more accurate: words or photographs?" I want to push my students to ask the same thing. When they did their person research too many times they only went to one or two sources and the information was conflicting. Students need to understand that everything is not relevant online.

    I really enjoyed this chapter. I really like how the author makes me understand how all of this works. Love the details he gives of his students and children.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Have you ever tried Skyping or Facetiming someone in a French speaking country for interview research? The Quebecois would at least be in a similar time zone for this.

      Delete
    2. Tammy: Yes, I have tried to Skype with the Indiana School for the Deaf, but was unable to do so because of confidentiality and release of information. I was hoping to get a class to skype with my class, but it didn't happen.

      I haven't thought about going into Canada and seeing about someone French to interview and research. Thanks.

      Delete
  15. Research within the library obviously varies on all levels as I am working with K-5. Right now, my research has been pretty basic, and after reading the chapter, pretty boring. I am looking forward to having students do more exploring on their own. I have assumed that K-2 kids needed me to ask the questions, when quite the opposite is true. They are full of questions, I just haven't been looking at it like that. So, I'm excited to find out what kinds of things they are interested in, what questions they have, and how they are ready to explore different topics, books, and authors.
    I have spent some time discussing authenticity of websites with older students while discussing internet safety. I am looking forward to letting them explore data and find mulitple sources to make sure what they are finding is reliable information. Elementary students tend to just believe what they see or read on line without proving it to be real. I recently showed my students a video called, "Kids react to encyclopedias." Watching them was hilarious! They are shocked we actually had to find information in books, but it leads to a great discussion on how anyone can put something on the internet and call it fact. Again, I am looking forward to letting loose a little and allowing the students more time to ask the questions and make any research we do a little more personal.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I currently teach Kindergarten and I too am sometimes shocked with how many questions my students have! They are always so curious! I am wondering how you have Kindergarten students conduct research? Do you do it as a whole group and talk through each step that you complete? I currently only have my students completing research through observations, centers, and using their senses. I find it hard as a Kindergarten teacher to have my students complete their own research.

      Delete
  16. In my classroom, students research is very hands on. I currently teach Kindergarten and my students are always completing a hands on activity. During science, we conduct experiments and use our senses to complete research. During math, we complete a whole group activity and then students complete center activities pertaining to the whole group lesson and skill they are working on. The same thing with Reading/Phonics.
    After reading this chapter, I do see more opportunities for students to complete research. However, I see more opportunities available in intermediate grade levels. I am not sure how to have my students complete more research in Kindergarten. I would love to hear any ideas from other primary grade level teachers!
    We do talk as a whole group about different ways to conduct research and find information. We have discussed using computers, newspapers, books, and interviews to find information.

    ReplyDelete
  17. As I stated in a reply above, I realize that I am doing the majority of the research for my students. When I am preparing a lesson there is so much that I want the students to know, that I end up doing all the work for them. I have gathered youtube videos, artist links, images, etc. I think that I need to limit what I present to them and set aside time for the students to do the research. My current way of doing things makes it pretty easy for my students, all they are researching is images for reference pictures when creating their art.

    ReplyDelete
  18. There are two types of research in my classroom; 1) article 2)internet. My students are currently researching information on the Camino de Santiago in Spain. There are articles that I have supplied to allow them to see different aspects [history, travel, preparation] for the journey on the Camino. I have enjoyed reading the chapter because I have tried to see my research on the Camino in all of these aspects. I am doing pretty good in covering them and it is a great feeling. I have had my students watch short documentaries on the Camino, I have had them work through a series of mental and cultural things that would involve them finding out from other Camino walkers what worked for them, and I have even had the hands on aspect as they have had to pack a backpack and do short hikes themselves. I have tried to do a little of each segment talked about in the chapter so that I can appeal to each different student in a different way. Some like to know the physical aspect, others want to know the preparation, and still others the cultural aspect.
    Due to the variety of the goals that need to be met in the unit, the pace of the year as been fast and the students have enjoyed it. I am so glad to know that this worked for me so that I can carry over this to other units and experiences in my classroom. I have not yet been able to use the interview aspect of the chapter, but there is still time. Overall, I think this was a great chapter to lay out the possibilities and challenge to attempt areas not yet done- again for me it is the interview area.

    ReplyDelete
  19. Loved this chapter! As I look at "typical" research projects from multiple classrooms in my school, they all usually look similar-sources used were books and websites. This chapter really helps teachers expand their view of "research". With a high population of EL students, including interviews as research would be a huge bonus for all students. It really is a great soft skill to give kids opportunities to speak with adults, especially in an interview format. As a No Excuses University School, each of my classrooms adopts a college. They have signage up, logos, they wear their college shirts. I see a huge opportunity for research in these classrooms. I would love to see my school put on a college fair (we are an elementary school), where groups of students research a college and put together a display and man a booth for the whole school to see. Educators need to help our kids see that research isn't limited to books and the internet; it is limited only by our imagination, creativity, and definition.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Chris, I love your idea of researching colleges and creating a college fair. I am a Purdue Academics fan. Often when I wear the Purdue name, students erupt into IU vs. Purdue athletics debates. I generally steer the conversation towards the academic strengths of the schools leaving the schools somewhat dumbfounded at the idea the names, Purdue and IU, represent more than sports teams. I would love to see the students go on field trips to area universities so that little ones dreaming of being nurses could visit a nursing school, lawyers...a moot court, botanists...a research lab, journalists...a state of the art tv/radio station, and athletes...sports complexes complete with a victory lap!

      Delete
  20. Research happens a lot in high school English, whether it be looking up some information about an author we are reading, finding support for a thesis or discovering the origin of the word "Oreo." With every student in my classroom having an iPad, research online has been easy. The difficult part is making sure that students aren't Snapchatting or getting to the next level in Warlords but as I mentioned in a previous comment and as I was discussing this with a colleague the other day, that happens. We all do it, in fact. Providing a list of websites to search helps somewhat, but that takes away from the whole "discovery-for-myself" aspect of research. So there's a little give and take that must happen.

    Reading this chapter reminded me that there are so many other facets of research beyond the book and the website. As part of an autobiography project that my students complete, they do interview an older family member...but I'd like to further incorporate the use of people as resources. I'd like to get better at having speakers come in and talk about a theme we are focusing on in our readings and perhaps have the kids take notes.

    However, this is more of the "prescribed" research. I'd like to give my students more chances to "daydream," as the chapter suggests, and go where their passions lead. Sometimes I'll have them do a problem/solution essay where they choose the problem and suggest solutions, engaging in problem-oriented and audience research.

    I was drawn to these two quotes from the chapter:
    "But research doesn't have to look like a graduate student's nightmare; it can look like a child's daydream," and "...research isn't about reading; it's about learning."

    Having to teach how to write a research paper lends itself well to giving the student the freedom to "daydream." They can go wherever their passion leads and I can help them organize it into a paper with different forms of sources. Perhaps I can open this up to video as well.

    I think helping students discover what they love and where their passions lie is key; it's been so disheartening when I allow a student to go anywhere they want and I ask them, "What could you talk about for hours?"...and they have no idea. I sometimes feel like for their whole lives they are told what to do and what to think about...that so little time is given to them to think their OWN thoughts and follow their OWN leads. I need to get better at this and allow more time for this.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This fellow English teacher agrees!! Love the idea of allowing kids to "daydream"; so much value in letting them explore their passions. My struggle is in balancing the gift of TIME and its efficient use. We do not learn on an efficient continuum. And there are always deadlines. (sigh)

      Delete
    2. Well said, Michelle. Research isn't always linear (thank goodness) and doesn't always have to be documented every step of the way. Sometimes it's hard to find that balance between letting students branch out on their own and wanting to help them focus in on what we think we are looking for.

      Delete
  21. I did a lot of research in my classroom, really focusing on using key words when searching for information. Google-a-Day is a great bell work activity that I had my students complete every Friday. Almost all of my students want to copy and paste their full question when searching, I really try to hone in on using only the most important words.

    I also really practiced using safe search and using Google images that are free to use or share for projects. With so much out on the internet, it is hard for middle school students to decipher truth from fiction.

    I really want to get better at allowing students more authentic ways to research, especially where they are the ones doing the research. So much can be learned through doing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Kara, this "Google-a-Day" bell work activity sounds really interesting. Could you give some examples? Thanks!

      Delete
    2. I love Google-a-Day! My problem with it is that by the end of the day, the search box automatically fills w the keywords of others.

      Delete
    3. Google-a-day sounds awesome! To fix the auto-fill issue, I think I will not use the same topic for all 3 of my sections. Or at least use three different perspectives (Psychological) concerning the same topic. I look forward to trying it.

      Delete
    4. Can you give a couple examples of the google-a-day process. Sounds like a great idea and would love to try it

      Delete
  22. My students do much research for different assignments in my classroom! We are constantly engaging with the world around, but always in a very traditional way. We consult encyclopedias, the internet, and informational texts. Something that I do need to integrate into my research etiquette repertoire is safe searching and online safety. Not only after having read the author's ideas on online research, but after real-life scary encounters I've realized the students always seem to find the black-holes that await them on the internet. I need to practice better online safety, that's for sure!

    ReplyDelete
  23. My students do research based on what they are wondering in their math and reading intervention. A lot of the times they are already wondering about a character or a problem before we've even had an in-depth discussion. My favorite type of research is the spontaneous, out of nowhere questions that lead to us trying to find answers. I love the curiosity young learners have. Often times what seems like a simple question will spiral into more deep thinking that produces even more questions! Until reading this chapter, I never saw these opportunities as specifically being research. I called them learning opportunities, but now I get to tell the students they are doing research when they are finding answers to their questions.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I totally agree with what you said about not really considering questions that produce more questions as research in the classroom. I also felt that way, and I can now see how those "rabbit trails" and tangents led us to discover and learn something new in many cases. It may not have been specifically related to the topic, but sometimes the best learning and discovery stems from other topics anyway.

      Delete
  24. Before reading this chapter, research was very rigid like how he mentioned in the book. I didn't think about letting them use other sources like videos, interviews, and social media to research their wonders. I am definitely going to be adding these into acceptable resources. I've used videos to spark wonders or to help them understand a concept. I will be keeping this chapter in mind when we research again so that my students can have more experiences with finding the bias in articles, photographs, videos, and other sources. I can see next year starting with researching and developing more thru out the year.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It really is amazing what great finds the students utilize with pictures. Text is a bit different however.

      Delete
  25. I have given a few different shorter assignments requiring different forms of sources in my Health classes. These assignments may include asking your friends how they handle sad moments, "googling" a type of pathogen and sharing some facts and a picture, and then summarizing a health related article. We practice various forms to encourage various forms.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I love this idea of having short assignments on a topic that can be a question they come up with. Thanks for sharing this.

      Delete
  26. When I first read the word "research" I thought ... "spending hours reading books and making index cards notes only to write one massive paper about it! Yeah that's never going to happen in the music classroom". But then I read the chapter. What an eye opener! I never thought about research being so many different forms! And boy are the options WAY more fun than reading and writing a paper about it. Why didn't I get this when I was in school!? With research being such a wide variety, YES this CAN be done in all subject areas!

    ReplyDelete
  27. I currently don't do much research with the groups of students I work with, unless the teacher has them working on a project that includes some research. I was thinking that I could try to work in some research with my guided reading groups. Students will come up with questions about some topics as we are reading and maybe I can try to make time for them to research and answer some of those questions. When I pull a math group I can lay out more manipulatives and give the children chances to answer questions they have about different math topics. Let the children show me what they want to know about the different topics.

    ReplyDelete
  28. Right now research looks like the traditional idea of a research paper. The students can pick a topic and then find books about the topic. They have templates to help organize the information and then the information is put together in booklet form. Of course the students do a sloppy copy and then rewrite everything and illustrate the information. After reading the chapter I can see many examples of work that requires research and then is displayed in a different manner. For example a timeline explaining the life of an author would be an excellent way to research the author. I look forward to exploring the possibilities for research.

    ReplyDelete
  29. I admit that I don't have my students do alot of research. The little that I do is with my 5th grade students. In the past, I've done projects where students pick a genre of music that they like and do a powerpoint or poster with some kind of speech about what they found or learned. I do a "Musician of the Month" with all my students. I do alot of research to get accurate facts. I found it interesting in the book that he made mention of how difficult it can be to get accurate information on the internet. How true it is! I've had to admit to the kids on several occassions that I told them something wrong. I try to model how I get my information when they ask me questions about the musician. If I don't know the answer, I encourage them to try and find the answer and then share it with the class. Unfortunately, time is always an issue when I only see them once a week for 40 min.

    I will be teaching a tech class one day a week next year. I can see how I could incorporate more research into those lessons. I'd like to see what topics teachers are discussing in the general classroom, and then maybe we could do some research on that.

    ReplyDelete
  30. Research is how my students form their understandings about concepts in social studies class. I do not lecture or show Power Points on what they need to know. It was eye opening when we read in this chapter how true it is that the little ones ask many questions and become trained to stop asking questions over time.

    I might provide them with a question to start, but more often they are encouraged to be curious and form their own questions. We worked on how we ask focused questions that can generate the most amazing answers. We do short research activities to lengthy scenario based research or problem oriented research. Short research might be them looking for the video clip that explains an answer to their question the best.

    1:1 allows multi media to be used in their research and to show their results, however they are limited on what they can use as much is filtered. I am looking forward to growing in the experiences I can provide students as restrictions are lifted. I know a lot of my middle school students live on YouTube and know they can find answers to their questions this way, but it is blocked. They love social media and connect with experts to answers, but those are blocked. Once these restrictions are lifted it will be amazing where students can go in their learning.

    ReplyDelete
  31. I currently teach 3-year-olds in a preschool, so our research looks much different. However, I completely agree with the authors when they say research isn't just about reading, it's about learning and discovery. We do plenty of that in our class! My kids can't read yet, but they are certainly asking questions and learning and discovering new things every day.

    The majority of our research falls mainly in the 5th type of research which is "Hands-On Research". When they build with blocks, LEGOs, or Magna Tiles, they are constantly creating new things and discovering through trial and error what works and doesn't in the building process. When they play with playdough, they are molding and creating new things all the time based on things in their own imagination. When they put puzzles together, they're often looking at how things fit, sometimes without even seeing the "big picture" of the overall puzzle. They're using magnifying glasses to look at things closer and see what happens. They're exploring things in the sensory bin like magnets, sand, dry pasta, rice, etc. to see how they fit and work with other objects. This is all discovery and part of the research process I believe.

    Probably the most important research they do is on a social level. They're constantly figuring out how to interact with others. They're learning what behaviors get a negative and positive response both from others and the teacher. So much learning comes from play!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I work with both intervention and high ability youth. The intervention math students use manipulatives rather than worksheets. The students discover and learn as they build and decompose and group and regroup numbers. The high ability students are constantly imagining, designing and building programs and mechanisms. We have a Wonder Wall so students can record their curiosities. Surprisingly, students are writing answers on one anothers Wonder statements. At all age levels, learning comes from wondering and imagining and curiosity and play.

      Delete
  32. I honestly don't do much research in my class. The one area I do let them research is when they are picking jobs they are interested in for the future but I have them answer certain questions and go to the websites I list to find information. I could definitely see how it would be much more exciting for them to go out on their own to get the info. Talking to people in s field they're interested in could be a blast not to mention life changing!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. And maybe interview people that they know about the career they chose, and how they feel about their choice. What parameters did they use to make that choice. What are the benefits of their job? Is it worth it, etc.....that would be awesome info for classmates to share with one another, and maybe they could all takeaway more than one type of job they might/might not be interested in.

      Delete
  33. As I read this chapter, the words "rigid research" kept repeating in my head. In our residential setting, research as traditionally pictured doesn't happen. However, our kids are always researching how things happen. Our research however looks a little different. Our youth are researching if staying in school is worth it. As educators in an alternative setting, our youth are considering dropping out of school as an option. School has been an ongoing challenge. They have been experts at being suspended and being kicked out. They are researching if success is an option. Is getting a high school diploma viable? Are they really able to learn? Is learning worth it or is the street life a better option or even the safe walls with three meals a day and people telling what to do daily in jail just the easier route?

    The research our youth do includes sizing up if teachers care. It includes can they still learn. Will teachers take the time to hear them and explain. Is it possible to learn differently? How can I learn to read at 15 years old. Will this Read180 really help me? If I really want to learn more about this, will you really take the time to show me how to learn more? If a teacher is doing a project in class, the research begins with websites pre-selected by the teacher. However, if the student shows extensive interest, it is not unusual for the teacher to take time to pursue further interest with the student. It is this time where the magic of learning takes place. This is often the deciding point of when a student in an alternative setting determines to stay in school. Rigid research is something that can't happen in an alternative setting. The world research in itself has to be defined differently.

    ReplyDelete
  34. I feel that by the time the students get to us at secondary, we as educators have driven that inquisitiveness out of them by telling the what to do, when to do it, how to do it, why to do it, and where to get the information. I believe secondary teachers then fall into the black hole of "When do I do this? I don't have time to teach them how to research and do all of my other standards too." It is important that as teachers we model that research to the students. We need to share with them what we are researching. As an administrator it is important for my staff to know that I too have to do research on topics. Research is and should be a continuous effort we all put forth to continue to learn.

    ReplyDelete
  35. One of my favorite research projects, is actually our culture experience. We give the students a wide variety of cultural activities that they must complete outside of class. We have everything from cooking, watching specific movies, choosing a reading from an approved list of books, to concerts, etc. The kids choose what they want to do. We give them some guiding questions, but they are open-ended, as we really want to see what they learned from the experience. What did they take away culturally from the movie? The food? The literature?
    My favorite part was that "research is learning, not just reading." (or something like that). They can look into things through music, TV, interviews, and other medias....
    I think that the most important thing with research came on page 122 when it said, "Is this information accurate?" There is so much fake news, fake web sites, sites that make pure opinion look like fact. They are almost inundated with sources, and trying to analyze all of them can be overwhelming.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Darcy, I find your idea of culture research intriguing. What a great way to learn about other peoples and ways of doing things. Next year our school is becoming an IB elementary and one of the ideas that I get from an IB school is the importance of realizing that our way of doing things may seem the best yet it may not be the only way. Other people may do things differently and understand an idea differently than us and it doesn't make them wrong just different. Your research on culture could fit very well into this thinking.

      Delete
  36. I think I have (had) a very old school approach to research. I read this entire chapter as an "aHa" moment to how I approach research. I always struggle with research. It's difficult to find sources accurate and appropriate for younger elementary students without pretty much giving them the information. I'm not sure that I feel a whole lot better about where to find good, open ended sources of information for my young students, but I definitely have a different mindset after reading this chapter. I was totally the teacher who would leave the research until the end of the year & viewed it as separate from learning. I appreciate being able to think about research in a different way.

    ReplyDelete
  37. I feel my students get ample time to research using their iPads. I have learned lately to break up the research into 20-30 minute segments. I teach for a while we research and I teach a little more. I think the launch method helps with the research needs. Students no longer need books near as much with the internet available. I do find myself going over what is good info and bad and how to tell the difference. Is it real news or fake news.

    ReplyDelete
  38. Lots of great ideas in this chapter - think my favorite is in the statements on page 116 - "real research is messy. It's fun" as well as "True research requires structure but only enough to make it work." Learned a lot and am beginning to appreciate more and more the "power" of questioning.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I loved that idea too. My kids so often want to have a question that they can just type into Google word for word and find an answer. Not exactly "real research" there.

      Delete
    2. YES! I liked how the chapter said research is "Messy" at the beginning but the end product can be great when organized and put together through the students questioning as they go. Frustration is not a bad thing either for kids to encounter as researching. They need to know that the answer may not be written out word for word but found as they research multiple sites, books, articles, etc. At the beginning of the school year my students want to always know if they are correct or doing something right, etc. and they have to learn to be independent and not given everything. It is so hard for some of my students at the beginning of the year.

      Delete
  39. My students use the internet. I see them using search engines and finding the information they need. I think my students as well as myself, forgot there were more exciting ideas near by. Videos are a good choice, but I've always thought badly of social media. If the students would use social media correctly, I would be all for it. I'll just need to lay the rules down, and let them go. I think our use of research has been somewhat boring. I look forward to adding a little spice to this dull project!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I too have always looked at social media as a "bad" thing. More and more I am learning that we might as well embrace it and teach kids to use it correctly since they are constantly on it. If we allow them to use social media for aspects of their projects, they may really surprise us with the creative ideas they come up with... but there is also the potential for issues.. It is a fine line.

      Delete
  40. In my Health class, I feel students' are always researching many different topics using online resources. As a result of having a 1:1, we find ourselves using the textbooks less and less. One of my 7th grade Health classes is researching any disease of choice, but I told them a requirement was they had to go home and talk to mom, dad, aunts, uncles, grandparents, great grandparents about various diseases that ran in the family or that someone had and was living with. Some students' chose a disease that impacted them personally. I gave them multiple days to do this, and we signed up for the disease that they were interested in learning more about. I like providing choices for their research because I remember when I was younger that I did not enjoy having to research something with no choice and no options for creativity.
    At the beginning of the year we discuss the basics of research, not using Wikipedia, trying to use more websites that end in .edu or .gov, but it can be tough at times trying to find reliable information on the web. I would like to try new things or new social media outlets to make projects more meaningful, and I would to try Google Hangouts for an interviewing aspect to possibly gain more research or to see an outside perspective. If anyone uses Google Hangouts, could you please let me know how you use it and does it work well??
    One more thing I like to do in class are Webquests. I provide 5-10 websites (approved and researched), and then ask 10-20 questions based on the info on the sites. Students' then have to travel to these websites and decipher through the information and find the things or answers that I want them to submit. Sometimes I provide options for their webquests, and they can choose between a "Quest for Healthy Nutrition" or a quest for "Importance of Physical Activity". I do like the idea in the book to provide a list of usable websites for students' to use to find information pertaining to the material you are covering in class. I continue to learn more and more, and reading others' posts. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think it was very smart of you to ask them to interview family members. Researching things that have real meaning in their lives makes the learning experience more powerful.

      I've never tried Google Hangouts. That is something I will look into!

      I sometimes provide my kids with lists of websites as well. It seems to work!

      Delete
    2. I also give a list of topics to choose from for research. I teach FACS and it works well with our curriculum. I usually start with a list of websites and encourage them add to that with a different type of resource such as interviewing someone or finding another site. This gives them choices and ownership. I would also like more info. on Google Hangouts and how to use social media.

      Delete
    3. Thanks for the feedback ladies, and I am going to look into Google Hangouts as well and see if it would be beneficial to use in class.

      Delete
  41. My Biology students research all the time through discussion boards, webquests, and homework assignments. Being a 1:1 school is extremely helpful in giving students opportunities to research. What we struggle with is teaching students to find reliable sources. So often I see students using websites like Wikipedia as their only source. It takes a lot of coaching to teach students to consistently use reliable sources.

    In PLTW Biomedical Science courses students are given patient histories and are challenged to act like doctors and other medical professionals who help to diagnose and treat the patient. Students have to research symptoms and processes to try to come up with explanations for the patient's symptoms. Students present their findings to me, other student groups, or individual students to get feedback and help them to further their research. Oftentimes another student or I will ask a question that brings up possibilities the student hadn't considered and helps to further that student's research.

    ReplyDelete
  42. Before reading this chapter, when I thought of research, I always thought of computer research. I teach Read 180, so we are always reading. Every time we start a new workshop or reading, I always have my kids use background information or tell me what they know about the topic. After reading this chapter it clicked that my kids are researching everyday. That is the best type of research for my kids because they need to learn how to relate background knowledge to what they are learning as well as express their ideas.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Elizabeth Stracener-
      I love the idea of interviews! Wouldn't it be great if the students participated in a Skype or Google Hangout with an "expert" in the field? Or after interviewing a local person, they could invite them to speak with the class? I really was encouraged to try some new things after reading this chapter!

      Delete
  43. I enjoyed this chapter on research. When I think back to high school "research projects," I think about the notecards I was taught to use to organized the information and ideas that I found. I looked at is as such a daunting, almost unbearable task. So I really appreciate the idea of students being allowed to organize the information, using their choice of organizer and from a variety of sources.

    ReplyDelete
  44. I enjoyed this chapter and feel like I am scratching the surface of better research in my classroom. I think as a whole, my school does the traditional research. I was nodding my head as I read about research starting at end of year because that is how the core subjects do this and they all use the note card system. I like the idea of letting students choose how they organize information and give options. I like to give open ended assignments but find that some students need more structure so I give options for both -or try to. I like to give a few sites to go to for information but encourage them to add to the list. Students also have access to Youtube so I try to get them to use this and they love that. I offer them to use the textbook as a resource but most rather use internet sites. It is a work in progress and I am constantly trying to learn about new ways to research, present information and just keep up with what is out there! Exhausting but also exciting!

    ReplyDelete
  45. I work in a library and find it interesting that there really isn't much 'research' done there. What I do see is classroom teachers requesting certain topics of books for them to have in their classrooms for students to write a research paper. Students often come back to get more books about the topic and I find that we are limited on the number of books that are available. In years past I have directed teachers to the databases and online resources that are available on our library website yet I hear that they want students to use books for their research.
    Just this past week I introduced our fourth and fifth graders to the databases and online links that our library website offers. As we more to a 1 to 1 ipad use next year I am hopeful that students will discover our library website and how it may be used for research.
    Our school is becoming an IB school next year so I have a feeling that our library space will become much more than it is now especially in regards to research, multimedia and exploring data.

    ReplyDelete
  46. This chapter opened my eyes about research with younger kids. Up until now, we've mainly used books and simple experiments for our research. I'm definitely going to incorporate interviews into my classroom - both in person and using technology (FaceTime, Skype, etc). I'm really excited to try this! I think that my students can also use the computer for research, but I need to do more homework on this. I think it would work if I had specific websites and pages already ready for the kids to use. Incorporating these research ideas into my classroom, along with the LAUNCH cycle, is going to be fun and eye-opening for the kids and myself.

    ReplyDelete
  47. Trying this *again*.
    My students do very traditional research. As in I give them a topic (brain development, finances, lifespan development etc.) And they find out information. Usually they find exactly what I want them to (ie things I already knew) and turn that into a Google slide or poster. This chapter made me see this presenting and process is actually boring Me. I'd love to learn something new from my students research. This is my new goal!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Elizabeth Stracener-I agree! Somtimes sitting through the days of slide presentations bores me too! Maybe it would be a good idea to have just a few students work on presentations for one unit, and have others scattered doing other topics throughout the year. I have given students choices on their visual aides, but they often gravitate to slide presentations because they are easy!

      Delete
  48. I have to confess that I am too much of a task master when it comes to a research project. The author's "get back to work" story about the whales really hit home with me. I look forward to allowing my students more freedom with their questions and organization of information. I often find video clips and websites for my students to use for research, but I don't usually think about trying to help them find "real people" to learn from during research. I can't wait to try to incorporate it soon!

    ReplyDelete
  49. My students do research in social studies when working on projects and when doing writing assignments. I do have to do a lot of monitoring during this time and often I find students spending more time on clip art, pictures, and graphics more then actual facts for their writing.

    ReplyDelete
  50. When the IDOE offered 'MyOn' this past year, my students used this resource to select a topic to independently read and then report to the class. This is the extent of research that my students have done. I do like the idea of interviewing, primarily because this approach is something that I know my students would enjoy.

    ReplyDelete
  51. Research is something that I try and incorporate in all the subjects that I teach. Students need to know how to research by being efficient and effective. This is a life long skill they can have that will benefit them in college, their career, family, and more. I teach sixth grade and one of the first lessons I teach is how to be effective and efficient when researching using the internet. We also go to the library and talk about how we can find the books needed for different topics. I believe it is quite important for my students to use books for research and not just rely on the internet. I love giving my students a broad topic but then they get to choose the route they take with guidelines that I have set up. I still have some control but they have some freedom too which I think they enjoy. In my language Arts class the students have done argumentative and persuasive papers and they have to research their evidence. In Social Studies the students research whatever we are studying and they have had to put it together as a slide show, power point, poster, paper, etc. In my digital Citizenship class the students do a final slide show with their research. I believe it is important to incorporate Research in a variety of ways. I did think about the Launch Cycle steps too when I was reading about this chapter.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I really agree with incorporating books and magazines as sources. The internet is wonderful, but students often forget that there could be an enormous amount of information right down the hall.

      Delete
  52. Student research in my Second grade classroom consists of the following: reading independently and whole group, using multiple technology devices, watching videos, journal entries, hands on discoveries, trial and error, investigations. I just named a few of my students favorites. With all of above I feel it is extremely important for myself to model each one so that students have and idea on how to use these research tools for themselves. My Second grade students are given an hour once a week to research a topic of their choice. They absolutely love this time and I am amazed at what they learn and create.

    ReplyDelete
  53. This was an eye-opening chapter for me on research. I have always viewed "research" in the traditional sense and this chapter showed me it can be so much more. In my Geometry classes, I have tried to incorporate some life- application, "research" opportunities at the end of units. One possible way to do this (after completing a unit on area of shapes) is to have students create a landscape design using scaled dimensions on a piece of graph paper. Students use the shapes they studied - triangles, parallelograms, trapezoids, rectangles, circles, etc. - and select specific flowers, trees, shrubs, walkways, etc. to fill those shapes.
    As students frequently like to ask, "When will we use this material in our lives?," it is important that I encourage them to "research" the possibilities.

    ReplyDelete
  54. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  55. I think students learn the most during the research phase of assignments. This is where they learn to question what they are reading and delve deeper. I encourage students to research throughout the year and am always looking for more ways they can ask questions and get great answers.
    At the beginning of every year, I tell my students that contrary to popular belief teachers do not know everything. Therefore, if they ask a question pertaining to something we are talking about in class and I do not know the answer, we put it on the Google Board. This is a way for them to research those questions and report the answer in real time.
    I feel that narrowing the search perimeters and concentrating on a single thought is the most difficult concept for students. I really liked reading about ways to help students get to the exact idea they wish to cover.

    ReplyDelete
  56. Currently, my 3rd graders are working on a research project where they had total freedom to choose the idea. After many days of discussion, brainstorming, and making lists of the order we would want; I held conferences with each child to "approve" and discuss their topic. We then spent several days spending our writing time doing research. We are in the process of uploading our information to a form on ebook where it can be published and displayed when they are done with their project. So far, they are absolutely loving it and are working so hard every chance they get! We host a "showcase" event where parents and family members are invited to come in to see what the students have been working on; I plan on showcasing this project!

    ReplyDelete
  57. Currently my 7th graders are researching for a "Topics" class I teach that lasts only 9weeks. They were able to pick from a list of topics such as; facebook, snapchat, instagram, global warming, current world disasters, 3-D,4-D printing and the list goes on and on. For this project I have individual meetings with each student to come up with a plan for his/her research. We discuss ideas of specific things to include based on the topic they have chosen. this definitely makes the research process flexible as in the chapter. Even though our studnets have ipads, I like to have them researach in the computer lab using a tabletop computer. For this specific research, we use on-line information for the majority of our information. Later on in the spring, I will assign an interview project that is completed outside of class. Interviews are amazing tools to have middle school students experience. For many, it causes them to step outside of their comfort zone. I like that! I have completed an example of the interview project and sometimes read parts of mine to kids that are struggling with the entire idea. Otherwise, I don't like to inhibit the creataive ideas that come from just letting them explore.

    ReplyDelete
  58. Elizabeth Stracener
    What does student research look like in my classroom and with my students?
    I currently do several types of research projects, such as Google Slide Presentations, Google Drawings, and the latest was a video PSA about abstinence in my health class. Most of the students use the internet to access information for their research.

    What types of research are my students doing? Most of the time my students are researching information that is relevant to the current topic we are discussing in class.

    After reading this chapter, I would like to include more brainstorming and looking at doing some type of service project directed at a problem/issue that the students may find interesting. This chapter made me want to explore more about allowing students to have more choices in this.

    ReplyDelete
  59. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  60. I teach history, and we do a bit more traditional research in my classroom at the beginning of the year. We use our textbook sometimes, but we also discover history on their own through internet searches or watching videos. Crash Course is great for World History! As we get through to more modern history, we do more individual and small group Visual Discoveries, where students look at pictures, political cartoon, propaganda, etc. to discover the history of a topic. For example, we look at political cartoons to discover the motives for Imperialism. I do a Current Events project at the end of the year, where students research a variety of issues facing the world today and possible solutions. They must also choose the best medium for their project to best get their ideas across. This gives students more freedom in how they research (primary and secondary sources, interviews, videos) and what they want to produce from their findings. I've done it for two years, now, so I am hoping to continue to better the process with what we are learning in this book!

    ReplyDelete
  61. I have been putting this response off because frankly I hate research for a class. I have not had my students do many research projects because it became such a drag for them and for me. I think it’s time to rethink all of this, given that it is so much easier to look for information than it used to be.
    At this point, research has become more like show and tell in my Spanish class. I share neat things I have found, and students sometimes do to, but it hasn’t been a requirement. I demonstrate my quest for knowledge for example, by showing them some of my slide shows of picture collections, for instance, on Mexican Muralists, but there are only one or two units where students do something like this in my upper level.
    I have been so focused on getting my students to know the basics that I haven’t let them use these basics on projects. I have had bad experiences with group work, and lazy work from students when I’ve tried it in my classes, that I have not looked at this chapter with enthusiasm.

    I am trying to keep an open mind that there is a way to do this so it hooks in my students and becomes something useful and not a waste of time. There is a way to do this so it works. Somehow. I just don’t know where to go with this or what to do. If I had continued on in physics instead of Spanish, maybe I have more of an idea how to use this Launch system in my classes. It would be so much fun to just let them play and maybe find something interesting, but then again there is that thing about staying on topic.

    ReplyDelete
  62. I found this chapter to be especially helpful. Actually there are many sites on the internet which help students comprehend and learn the value of math. If a person was researching ways that math is used, the videos on the internet would be very informative. Another avenue for research in math are movies. Even though the movies may not be 100% accurate, they certainly open the students' eyes to new experiences and provide information that gives way to questioning. This chapter definitely gave me some new frontiers.

    ReplyDelete
  63. After attending a conference by Kristina Smekens, I took her idea of keeping a tub of Snapple lids in my classroom. They have an interesting fact inside of each lid. I let the students read through them when they have time. They are able to choose one and work on research of the fact whenever they have down time. They keep notes in their journals and can present to the class when they finish. I also do basic research of the regions of America, states, a famous explorer, and documents from history thoroughout the year. I have currently started using Google Classroom with my students. I pose a question and they answer it after watching a video clip or reading an article. I really want to start incorporating Wonder Days into our schedule. I was thinking, while reading this chapter, about asking staff members to email me an interesting fact about themselves. For example, one teacher lives with Multiple Sclerosis, and if the staff are willing I would like my students to pick a topic from the list of info and allow them to research the topic and then set up intervies with the staff members. I love the idea of having my students doing more interviews!

    ReplyDelete
  64. Research is often the best part of a project for some kids. They finally get a chance to find the answers to their questions! Having them narrow their focus is always challenging, as well as the process of sorting out their questions. Being able to determine the difference between which questions should be included in research is often tough for my students. I would like to try the authors’ idea of having them rate the questions individually and then as a small group.
    I like the idea of starting research at the beginning of the year. It then becomes part of the regular classroom routine, instead of a once-a-trimester event. I was struck by how much research sources have changed since I started teaching. Internet sources and social media contacts have certainly changed the game in the last 20 years! My students do all of their research online as we have a very limited amount of time to work with. I would like to model more ways of collecting and organizing information and ideas: especially sketch notes. I think this format would be helpful to my students.
    Support/scaffolds/modeling for younger students is always necessary. We are fortunate enough to be able to work with our great media specialist to find kid-friendly websites and books to use for research projects with our 5th graders.
    Interviews can be one of the most impactful ways for students to understand information. We have an 8th grade LA teacher that does a Holocaust unit. She sets up a Skype session with a victim of Nazi persecution for all of the 8th grade. Students are allowed to ask well-prepared, thoughtful questions and I am always impressed by how meaningful this interaction is for all involved.

    ReplyDelete
  65. With my current schedule I teach P.E./ weight lifting 7 out of the 8 periods of the day. The one period that I do teach health I only have those students for 9 weeks. With this being said the students in my health class really don’t do projects any more considering that we are lucky to get threw five chapters. Before the schedule changed we did an alcohol research paper and a health triangle poster. Students would use books from the library there ipads and their textbook for research. I would often have to help students find reliable websites for the research paper. For my weight lifting and P.E. classes I have found that YouTube is my best source for ideas.

    ReplyDelete
  66. I am happy to say that I have used an assortment of research opportunities in my 6th grade Language Arts classroom! I do start early in the school year because the social studies and science teachers have projects that involve research and they count on me to cover such items as: reputable websites (we do not use Wikipedia, but don’t mind if they wish to see what may be there), date last updated; authorized by reputable, professional sources who list their credentials or contact information; look at the domain name, do they cite their sources or links; is it biased, etc. I do provide several websites and link them to my website so the students can determine which will be most beneficial for their topic. I do model one of the websites so they know what to look for. I require my kids to use at least 1 book source, one magazine or journal source, a reference source/encyclopedia, and no more than 3 websites. I’ve had good success with interviewing, but I do require they think carefully about questions that will be asked prior to the interview. This encourages less talkative students to interact with others and to stay on topic. Encourage picture/images that compliment the topic, and insist on a Works Cited page! Videos, YouTube, audio resources are audience specific and make topics come alive. If I can find a webquest that offers research opportunities, that is a great way to begin the research process. I really appreciated the Collection & Evaluation process with the 6 steps. Step 3 encourages data exploration which correlates nicely with math, science and English/Language Arts. This was the first lesson that I felt I was knowledgeable and experienced in! Feels good!

    ReplyDelete