Monday, February 13, 2017

Launch Week 2: Finding Your Creative Approach

Welcome to week 2 of the book club. Do you agree with the authors that we are all creative? They list 6 types of creative people. What type(s) are you? Or do you fit into another type that they don't list? If you would like, give an example of how this creativity comes out in your classroom.

I know a few people had problems commenting to the blog last week. If you have problems, please try logging in from a different network (if you have problems at school, try from home and vice versa) or try commenting from a different account. If you still have problems, please contact me (Meri) at carnahan@doe.in.gov. Here are some other details about the book club:

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  • If you would like, connect to other people reading this book on Twitter using the hashtag #launchbook.
Next week we will read and discuss chapter 3, "The Launch Cycle."

175 comments:

  1. I think the author explained it very well that we are all creative in different ways. When he was explaining the 6 types of creative people I was like oh that type would fit that teacher in our school, this type would be a different person, and this one is for me. I believe that we are all creative in our own way, and it’s knowing who you are and bringing that creative person out in the classroom. I find myself to be the “Geek Artist”. I love to create new things. Recently my classroom was learning about the American Flag. Instead of doing just true and false statements and write them on the board, I wrote the statements on sentence strips and the ones that were true became the white stripes on an American flag I had created. But there are parts of me that like likes to explore existing models. In my mind, if something works why fix it? I also love to look at data and see where my students are struggling and where they are excelling and work to improve them as students.

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    1. Samantha, I too started relating what the author was saying to people at my school! I feel that knowing this information will not only help me relate to the people around me on a professional level, but on a personal level too. With that in mind, I found that one way of creativity may be my own, but it's not what's most effective and helpful for everyone. I'm going to need to challenge myself to appeal to more creativity types to ensure that every student I encounter is being taught to and helped on an independent level. Using what works for me is easiest, but it's not what's going to work for every kid in my class; that's what's going to challenge me most. I love my comfort! But, I need to love my students more:)

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    2. You make a good point of making sure there is room for all of the creative types of students as well. If we always develop projects/lessons with our style of creativity as a guide, it won't appeal to all the students. Our students will also have a variety of creativity styles.

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  2. When the author was describing the six types of creativity I was waiting to find one that I went, "Ahh! That is ME!" and I was a bit let down. I don't think I fit in any of those descriptions 100%. Because creativity doesn't have to fit in a box with a bow, I think I personally fit in a few different categories. I liked the engineer and highlighted, "this teacher doesn't feel compelled to reinvent the wheel". I feel like I am always on forms, blogs, Pinterest, or my e-community finding ideas that I can beg, borrow, and steal. I also liked the quote from the Point Guard, "you plan an event and people don't see it as creativity..." I am a total party planner! I love doing it, hosting, entertaining- even in my personal life! I like that the author ended this chapter by a little motivation that we have to work together-we need all types of creativity- to be a successful body!
    Creativity in my classroom is seen through organization (I have a specific color coded pattern my kids pick up on), my students do a lot of planning (we have many projects throughout my curriculum where they plan for babies, disasters, death, marriage, etc..), and I do make a lot of my curriculum based off what I've seen other FCS teachers do and tweek to my likings. Because FCS is an elective in most schools-teachers in this subject area have to be fun, creative, and unique to get kids in your room and keep your program alive!

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    1. Amanda I completely agree with you! When I was reading as well I thought I was a little bit of a different creative types. When you stated "creativity doesn't have to fit in a box" that was a great way to put it! I also loved how the author ended that we need to work together to be a successful body! I think that since we are all creative in different ways we need to work together because all teachers offer something different to their students. In working together we not only make our students stronger, but us as teachers stronger as well!

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    2. Amanda- we sound like we may have a lot in common :) I'm an elementary STEM teacher, but completely agree with everything you've written above.

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    3. I reread the chapter again, after reading the prompt, because I was struggling to find that one type that is me. I think that is partly due to the fact that we do have a hard time identifying ourselves as creative, when we have had a narrow definition of the word for so long. So, I echo what all three of you have said. I find parts of myself in three, but I do think the Geek applies to me the most. I am a social scientist, and I rely heavily on the science part in my classroom; especially in AP Psychology. I see scientific proof as the key to getting my students to gain a better understanding of the subject. Brain scans have changed not only my classroom, but the science itself. My students can no longer argue that they do not have a rational mind, when I can show them physical proof that it is still developing! Finally, they believe me!!!

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    4. I completely agree as well! I also was a little disappointed that I didn't fit one specific criteria perfectly, but it's true that we're all creative in different ways. Thankfully, we don't have to always "fit the mold" to still express our creativity. :)

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  3. I love a reading the makes you reflect, or be cognizant on how effective we are as teachers. This chapter really helped me see that although I may not look like everyone else, I can still be considered creative. I related the most with the Engineer as I am always on the look out for better solutions without reinventing the wheel. I find the benefit of participating in book clubs, Twitter chats, MOOCs, or workshops when I am able. I make sure that in the end I leave with an action plan and not just place the book on a shelf. These interactions have led me to start transforming my classroom into a student led classroom this year. The ideas I use came from those shared by other educators. Students work collaboratively together daily, reflect on their 21st century skill levels, set goals to see growth in themselves, ask each other questions, share tips for success with each other, be curious and show the results of their curiosities by choosing their own way to show what they know and can do. They celebrate often by Celebrating Mondays, Thankful Thursdays, and High Five Fridays. I am looking forward to reading how you show your creativity in your classroom for me to add more tools to the kit that benefits kids in the end.

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    1. Interested in knowing what a MOOC is?
      I love the idea of Celebrating Mondays, Thankful Thursdays and High Five Fridays... great ideas!

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    2. Massive Open Online Course. I met passionate educators and was pushed beyond my boundaries through this experience. I am having a great year with students because of it. There is a second book club led by author of Innovators Mindset, George Couros, starting Feb. 27. I am excited to join again. Check it out: http://georgecouros.ca/blog/archives/7070

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    3. I just got that book! I'll have to look into the book club - thanks for sharing!

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    4. Thanks for the book club tip! The Innovators Mindset is on my 2017 list of books to read...blog, twitter, and Facebook...OH,MY!

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  4. Good Morning! After reading Chapter 2, I do believe that ALL people are CREATIVE in some way. I admit that I did not think this before. The author did a phenomenal job explaining six different types of creative people. I can now see all six of these in our school and see how they are all unique and spark learning in their own ways. I can identify with more than one type and now value each different one. I also can now truly understand that we need all types to create a unique learning environment in our school.
    This chapter enabled me to take a good look at myself and how I use my creative ways in a school library setting. I feel that I am a true cross between the ARTIST and the ARCHITECT. I love creating ideas to get students to enjoy reading and I will stop at nothing to attain this goal. I am the type of librarian that works all summer long to discover and develop new ideas to utilize in the library. I plan the library space using a comfortable and welcoming setting and find the students love to be in the library. I am constantly trying to develop ideas from scratch...the true architect. My passion is to instill in students the joy of reading. I am constantly book talking and utilizing displays and INSTAGRAM to highlight different authors. I would now like to learn to use my creativity in new and exciting ways with my students. From LAUNCH and others adding to this blog, I hope to learn ways to make the library space even more innovative. I want to spark not only the joy of reading but the joy of learning. I want the students to know that the library can be the foundation to many learning activities.

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  5. I completely agree with the authors. I feel I am kind of a mix of all of the types. Many times, I find myself being creative in ways I didn’t even know. This chapter was an eye opener, most of all, because I feel people categorize “creative” as someone that makes something or paints something, and the authors categorize “creative” as a multitude of beings. I feel teachers are one of a kind individuals that are made for solving problems, because on the daily, we do solve problems, often without even realizing it. And as we solve these problems on the fly, we are being creative in our own ways, whether we are being recognized for it, or not. I am creative in my own classroom in many ways, throughout the day. As a life skills teacher, I often have to put out many “fires” that come my way, such as discipline within my classroom, and new consequences to switch things up and keep my students on their toes. Another way I am creative is by creating new job boxes for my functional students or modifying pre-existing ones to fit my students needs. These job boxes train my students by doing hands on activities for jobs they may have in the future, such as sorting silverware, or copying papers on the copy machine.

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    1. I love what you said about teachers being creative when we problem solve or come up with solutions to manage our classrooms. We are definitely creative even we may not realize it.

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    2. I completely agree that being creative is often described as being artsy (painting, drawing, crafting, act.). As teachers, I feel like we are automatically creative in a lot of different ways. No 2 classrooms are the same whether it is the theme of the room, the teacher's teaching style, differentiated assignments, etc.

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    3. Yea....I think they used to call it being flexible:) When I stop and think about it I am creating everyday in my classroom, but I do want to increase the amount of student creativity that I can inspire.

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    4. Brianna,
      You make some great points in this post. I too see myself as being in search of solving problems or improving areas of need improvement. I also don't see myself as fitting into one exclusive category. I think I have a bit of ARTIST and ENGINEER the most. I want my classroom and sports team to have new, functional, and collaborative processes in place so that learners are inspired to risk the status quo for something greater.

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  6. Yes, I believe that everyone is creative in their own way. I also liked how they stated that you did not have to fit yourself into one category. You could be a Geeky-Artist or a Hacker-Engineer. These were great descriptions! I am sure every person here read the descriptions and could place a name of a staff member in every section. Having a balance of these teachers is also important to students in a school. We have a variety of creative students and we need a variety of creative adults to reach out and connect with them. I also believe that the collaboration piece is very important. Sometimes you can build creative thoughts together than neither of you would have created on your own.

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    1. I agree that collaboration is key. I caught myself trying to figure out which categories my creative colleagues fall into, because it is true that you need a variety of types within a department or school.

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  7. Expanding my understanding of creativity, I believe we all use creative approaches somewhat determined by the amount of chaos each of us is willing to withstand, and I can’t handle much; therefore, I am an engineer. The line that reflects my approach speaks the truth: “the creativity of an Engineer may not always be obvious because it looks so practical and hands-on.” (Spencer and Juliani). I appreciate when I don’t have to invent everything, that I could cobble together some parts and pieces that are already known to function and make them better. Some of the approaches gave me heart palpitations: the Hacker scenario caused me to stop reading for a time; it was the suggestion to have the students fill in all of the standardized bubbles so they could read novels that put me over the edge, yet I am sure this gave some colleagues and fellow bloggers a thrill and brought on cheers.

    The creative approaches reminded me of other labels that we have been asked to consider over the years. Some were called thinking styles, multiples intelligences, or personality indicators. It is interesting that many of those have previously relegated creativity to one type or quadrant while Spencer and Juliani recognize creativity in all approaches.

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    1. Tammy,
      I so agree with the statement you made about the amount of chaos one can withstand. I find this so interesting to see in the different staff members that I teach with. It is as different as night and day and for that I am thankful. I hope that our students are as well. I would think this would make for a really bad day if every teacher, on every staff held a chaotic classroom. Thanks too for the honesty about the heart palpitations, I understand totally because all I have to do is hear math and the same thing happens to me!

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    2. And of course this comment would attract you, Amy Cullum, because you have a higher chaos threshold than any other teacher that I have ever met!

      In my week one post I commented that I really believe that for me as my experience has increased, so has my creativity. And of course, as my experience has increased, the chaos level in my classroom has decreased. Having the well earned respect of my students has allowed me to branch out more, with less chaos than I experienced in the early years.

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    3. I agree about the management of chaos with experience. And what appears chaotic to the observer may lead students to a better understanding in the end. I am using a math program this year called Big Ideas Math; one of the entry points of each lesson is for students to discover some mathematical truths on their own. This gives some students fits; it probably would have annoyed me as a student, as well. However, I can see that moving forward, students have a deeper understanding of those truths than they would have if I had handed them a formula or cut out the investigation phase. The lesson isn't always 'neat' on day one, and I have needed to practice some patience to accept this.

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    4. I believe in "organized chaos." Some of the best learning happens this way. Neat and tidy isn't for everyone.

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    5. Thank you for introducing the other label brought on by thinking styles, multiple intelligences, and personality indicators. In what seems like another lifetime ago, I have participated in some of these 'tests'. Never really pulling strongly into a particular label, I often felt bland or insignificant compared to my strongly labeled colleagues. Truthfully, many of the given options did not speak my truth. This chapter validated my creativity. When time, resources, and the success of the student necessitates it, I can be the artist or the geek or the architect or the engineer or the hacker or the point guard or the astronaut (as revealed at thelaunchcycle.com/mindset). Today, driven by a love of teaching and learning, I label myself as a creative wanderlust willing to courageously adventure into any creative approach!

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  8. I definitely agree that everyone is creative... however, when I read chapter 2, I had a VERY hard time assigning myself to one of the creative types. It was pretty funny, actually, because as I was reading I thought about ALL my teacher friends, and could easily assign them to a category, she's an Engineer, she's a Geek, she's TotalLY a Hacker.

    I consider myself to be organized, task oriented, and enjoy beginning new projects. I'm much more technology driven than "artsy" and don't enjoy data. Architect/Point Guard maybe? If I HAD to give myself a label...

    My favorite part of this chapter was on page 38- the Brain Boost. Where are you giving children a chance to zig-zag in their learning and do you give yourself permission to tinker as a teacher... I think I have a hard time with giving students a chance to zig-zag because it's often times hard for them to stay on task while doing so. Creating an environment where students can zig-zag AND stay focused is an ultimate goal for me... a work in progress!

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    1. I chuckled as I read your comment. I completely pictured our teacher group at the end of the school day and decided that I needed to take this chapter and put the creative types on name tags and just label my peers. I was completely identifying my fellow educators under their identifiers. I then had to try to figure out how they would identify me -- besides completely hyper...very data oriented and love being goofy and creative to get the job done. This entire chapter could be a professional development in itself.

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  9. I agree that everyone is creative. However, each person may not recognize his talent! As I read chapter 2, like other have commented...I was identifying coworkers' categories. After I read the chapter, I found myself exploring which category the various students in my classes were. Now that was fun! Watching how cooperative groups (not assigned by me) were functioning when two Geeks were together or three out of four Engineers! Interesting dynamics!

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    1. I also found myself looking at the kids and diagnosing them within a category. Was interesting to watch as they transitioned to final project and the life learning processes that happened along the way.

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    2. This was also interesting to me. In addition to being the librarian, I teach a Cadet Teaching class. Today my students began creating a classroom game to use in their cadet teaching classrooms. I found myself watching my students and trying to figure out what category they would fall into. Some were very easy to diagnose others not so much! Watching my students create was wonderful but trying to diagnose a category was eye opening.

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  10. I agree with the authors that everyone is creative. Being an art teacher, I tell all my students that everyone is an artist. We are just at different levels and some have more of a natural talent, and others have to practice more to become better. The six types of creative people are: artist, geek, architect, engineer, hacker, and point guard. I would say I fall under several of those categories. The first one would be artist. I'm very creative and I would also consider myself a geek because I'm overly organized and very particular about things. I am always trying to tweak things be be better and more efficient. I'm also an engineer because I don't reinvent the wheel. I use other art teachers ideas or things I find online.

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  11. I too think all people are creative, not just teachers. New inventions or ways of doing things happen every day. Without that creativity, life would have stalled.
    I find myself within two or three of the different types depending on whether the task is starting from scratch or a revision. I have often told my colleagues that I have lots of ideas, but can't always come up with that first step. That is the beauty of collaboration. They help make the process/project worth while. The problem solving along the way is just as fun (most of the time) as the end product.

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    1. I agree that it is beneficial for us to have colleagues that complement us, and it is also beneficial for students to have teachers from multiple approaches. It makes for a better packaged, well-rounded education when students have encountered many different styles of lots of things (creativity, intelligences, learning/teaching styles).

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    2. Agreed, it certainly takes a village to raise a child...and to teach one! Do you think the professional learning community time that we are given helps with this or is most of your collaboration done whenever there is time?

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  12. I believe that every teacher (and person in general) is creative or has the potential to be.

    I would have to describe myself as a Geek. I am constantly adapting labs and assignments so that they can be better paired with our 1:1 technology. I enjoy looking at data and deciding what aspects of assessments and projects need to be changed for future students.

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  13. When I read about the different types of creative teacher I wanted to fit a category but instead found myself in 3! The geek, the engineer and the hacker. I think the common thread is that I want to come up with ways to "fix" something. I find good ideas online, on pinterest or in a book then I have to tear them down and redo them to fit my class and my style. In the end it sometimes it doesn't even look like what I started with! I love data and graphing and looking at trends! Must be one of the reasons I teach science!!

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    1. The more approaches you see yourself identifying, the more understanding you will be of students from different styles. So, all the better to embrace several approaches.

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  14. I believe I am a geeky-engineer. I recognize the value in data and systems and crave research-based approaches, while also enjoying taking structures and replacing pieces that are weak. At times, I turn into an artist - creating the character education curriculum entirely from scratch complete with a logo, style, and branding. I can enjoy this type of creativity, however my artistic side comes and goes. Creating can be quite exhausting and time consuming. Over the summers, I become an artist, and mid-semester, I am the engineer - replacing parts of my program that don’t work, and adapting resources already out there.

    I like the piece about the hackers. These people make me most nervous, but I appreciate their worth. As a stringent rule-follower, I often admire those who shirk the rules and focus on the larger concepts like respect and kindness. However, at the same time, I am uncomfortable with their lack of regard for rules. In a public school, rule following often seems vital to avoid total chaos. There is great value in having teachers who show students that blatant rule following is not always needed, while also having teachers who enforce routine, structure, and rule-following ability.

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    1. I liked the Hackers part, too, and found myself wishing I was a little more of a hacker! Your point about needing that nice balance of teaching styles in a building resonates with me.

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    2. @ Helen Dunn, I think you and I have a lot in common. I am definitely a geeky-engineer. I wish I had an ounce of hacker in me too, but am a total rule follower. (Sometimes I might talk a big game, but always fall back on the people-pleasing, rule following.) I am often very uncomfortable when I am surrounded by a hacker...or worse yet, a group of them.

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  15. I absolutely agree that all of us are creative beings. For me this chapter helped remind me that to define a word like "creative" almost defeats the purpose. My personal challenge with fostering this creativity is time and resistance. Another challenge for me lies in getting my students to understand that many of their endeavors ARE creative, but that gorging themselves on "scrolling" consumption is decidedly not.

    My favorite part of this chapter is the brain boost on page 37; " - whether they were painters, actors, or scientists - was how often they put their early thoughts and inklings out into the world, in sketches, dashed-off phrases and observations, bits of dialogue, and quick prototypes." Creative thought and production are not always about how pretty something looks at the end of the day!

    As far as the Creative Approaches go, I honestly see bits of myself in each of them, depending upon the time of year, the text through which we are working, and the skill sets we are practicing.

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  16. I also agree that any teacher can be creative, it is just a matter of taking the time to try new things and planning for these as well. I think that it can be difficult trying to be creative/inventive, but it can be done with proper planning.
    I also was disappointed that I do not think I fit into any one of the six creative approaches, but if I had to pick I would say I am a mix between an Architect and probably more-so a point guard. I enjoy developing my own Health presentations, instead of using the pre-developed Google slides presentations. I enjoy adding my own links to various websites, and adding in assignments as we go along. I also think I am more of a point guard because of my subject area (Physical Education). We are always setting up "new opportunities for students, and the experience for the student" is what they will remember. In P.E. we set up many opportunities for students to succeed "as a group"and individually, and watching and seeing the successes of your students' creates memories. Ex:) If a student is running the Pacer Test or the mile run and they beat their previous score or mile time, they have experienced growth and some students' love seeing that gain or small success.
    In summary, we all can be creative and we can learn from each other's ideas and that is what makes a difference for our students'. Having teachers' that teach in many different creative approaches, and being able to take the time and go outside the box and try new things.

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    1. I think it is great that you mentioned students need to succeed as a group and individually. It is important for students to feel success as teamwork and success on their own.
      I also agree that experience is what students will remember. Not many students will remember sitting in class reading a book or listening to a lecture. However, creating a life-long memory or correlating the activity to a real-life experience will have a much longer lasting effect on the student.
      We are all creative in our own ways. I think it is awesome that I am learning how other teachers are creative in their classrooms and how I can be more creative in mine!

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    2. Yes, it's so funny how that works....teachers' work so hard on their lesson plans and curriculum, but when it comes down to it students' remember experiences, and things that directly correlate with their future or likes vs. dislikes. I also think students' remember teachers' by their relationships they have formed with them, and this could be based on a variety of things really.

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  17. I agree 100% that everyone is creative. I believe we are all created in the image of God, and since He is the Master Creator, we are also creative. Also, this chapter explains that creativity comes in many different forms or in a matter of perspective.

    After reading chapter 2, I learned there are a lot more ways to be creative than I first thought. I could relate to a couple creative types, and knew without a doubt other categories were not talking about me. I can relate to being an engineer and an artist. I feel that the artist side of me is depicted in my classroom when I have the students create things that we often hang on the wall and use at a later time. For instance, in math we have collectively created number posters to learn numbers 1-10 and to refer to as we do different number related activities. In addition, the engineer in me appears when I take what someone else has already created and use it to fit my students. I can be overwhelmed by a blank sheet of paper, but with a few guidelines, I have an easier time creating something unique.

    I look forward to further identifying the creative styles of my students and peers.

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  18. After reading chapter 2 I have found that there are so many types of ways to be creative for teachers and students alike! I was blown away by all the different types there were outlined. This was so helpful when I considered my students and the different types of learners they are. I think it is so important that we as teachers differentiate for each type of learner and now I know that even doing so with different aspects of creativity is just as important. I always try to incorporate a "your choice" option or several different options for the students to pick to suit their needs, reading this just reinforced this element of projects/assignments I do.

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    1. I also couldn't believe all the different approaches to creativity that this chapter outlined. It is neat how you are going to use this information to reach more students and their creative side.

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  19. I really enjoyed this chapter. I found my highlighter going faster than I could keep up seemingly as I took bits and pieces from all of the types of creative thinkers. There was one that I pull away from for sure and that is the Geek. I just don't think that way. I don't see a data driven anything because numbers scare me and I stay away from them. What I did find out and really chose for myself was the Hacker and the Point Guard. Let me explain, the Hacker line that really got to me was this," attuned to the quiet injustices kids face". I did not do well in my high school Spanish class. I tried, but the grammar did not come easily for me. So, I understand the situation that many language learners face, they just don't get the sentence structure and verbage. I was determined to change that when I began teaching and this is where the Point Guard in me comes out. If I had to choose only one definition for myself this was it, but my heart lies in the Hacker as well to try and help kids. The Point Guard definition found me saying "that's me!" more than any of them. I feel like I think differently and my approach not only to class content, but discipline as well is different than others. I enjoy running with an idea wide open and getting excited about a new concept because that gets the students excited as well. Failed? Often, but really feel like I do well - as the book says- thinking on my feet and making it work. Mind you, this description of me is nothing about real life because I only watch basketball, not play it, but in the classroom chalk-talk, this is spot on.

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  20. I've always thought that some people were more creative than others. After reading chapter 2, I realized that creativity comes in different packages, and thank goodness for that! I can't imagine if we were all exactly carbon copies of each other. What a boring world it would be. I always explain to my students that that's why there are so many different styles of music. So that everyone can find "something" they like. It makes sense that our creativity would come in different genres too.
    As far as my creative style, I think I am a little of everything to some degree, but fit the engineer the most. I like to take the wheels created by others and tweak to fit my own. I like to try new things and see how they work. I love the teacherspayteachers website. I find all kinds of little gems that I can tweak to make my own. I am a little creative geek too though as I like things to be organized. I'm very task oriented.

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    1. I love that you mentioned how boring the world would be if we were all the same! I feel as if my students are often trying to fit into a certain category to be accepted by others instead of being their creative selves! Each person brings something new to this world.

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    2. Funny, I would always say how boring the world would be without the artist! After reading this chapter, it is not only the artist, but the geek, architect, engineer, hacker, and point guard!

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    3. I did a teaching seminar called Passport to Innovative Education at The Summit in Fort Wayne. The seminar is about chapter education.I believe Passport still has openings for this summer.
      In the seminar we assessed our personality strengths. Knowing your strengths and the strengths of others you collaborate with is really helpful in getting the job done. I image knowing your creative style would be helpful too. And help keep things from being boring :)

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    4. Peer pressure on students, to "conform to the group" is very intense these days and can be very dangerous. Perhaps we, as teachers, can find a creative way to teach our students to embrace differences and learn to accept each other and work together. One time, a student came to me and was telling me how another girl didn't like her and that the other girl told a friend of hers not to talk to her at recess that day. I said "Well, even as adults we don't always get along with everyone or like everybody but it's important to try. Why don't you and "the other girl", take just 5 minutes and try to find something you both like or have in common. If after 5 minutes you still don't like each other or have anything in common, that's alright too as long as you ignore each other and don't get into any more fights." She took my advice, and the two girls were friends! And it only took 5 minutes. I was so proud of them!

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  21. I definitely think that any teacher can be creative. Before this chapter I thought of creativity as the Artist type mentioned in the book. After reading this chapter I am recognizing the creative effort my co workers make each day. As I was reading, I found myself thinking about which type I would fit into. I think I have a few qualities for each and don't fit into everything one type listed. Engineer is definitely the one I lean towards most. I will keep this chapter in mind as I watch other teachers.

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    1. I agree that it is hard to decide which type of creativity that I tend to be. I came to the conclusion that it take a mixture to get the job done.

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  22. Loved this chapter! I 100% agree that everyone is creative. It just looks a little different in how we display our creativity. I like how the authors describe that you don't have to fit into just one type, as I for sure do not. I see myself fitting into certain types depending on the task I'm trying to accomplish. I plan on sharing the ideas in this chapter with my students so they too can understand the importance of being creative, but to also recognize when they are being creative. Now that I understand that creative thinking has many forms, I will begin to recognize and praise students for demonstrating it. I can see it promoting self-esteem for many students. I know that my own self-esteem has been boosted now that I consider myself a creative teacher!

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  23. I do agree with the authors that everybody is creative. I think as teachers, we are all creative in our own way. We are creative in decorating our rooms, completing fun and engaging projects with our students, creating assignments that are intriguing but also a fun way to teach/assess a standard.
    I don't think that I fit into one creative type. However, I lean more towards the engineer style the most. I often use teachers pay teachers to gain ideas/resources to help teach a lesson. Then, I change it to fit my classroom/needs.
    After reading this chapter, I do recognize the creativeness of my co-workers each day. I think that is what makes my school so diverse and intriguing, because each teacher is different and provides their own creative flare to help students succeed.

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    1. Definitely helps to have lots of people and lots of different views when people can work together!

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  24. I do believe that everyone possesses creativity. I loved how chapter 2 put some labels in my hands so that I could think about what those creative types are. Each time I read a new heading, I was trying to put myself (or my colleagues) into one of the categories highlighted. It was definitely a fun chapter to connect with, however I was having a hard time identifying with just one category. As I finished, rather than trying to label myself with one of the creative approaches, I started to identify situations in which I applied different approaches. It reminded me of the theory of multiple intelligences. We possess them all, but some are just stronger than others.

    I think I would have to categorize my strengths in the area of geeky-engineer. I am definitely a person who looks at data and research. I want to know that if I am spending my and my students' valuable time on something, it has a proven benefit for all. However, I also spend a lot of time "tweaking" activities and lessons I have found to meet the day to day needs of my curriculum and students' needs. I love to spice up a lesson with a video or activity to spark my students' thinking. I am definitely a believer of not recreating the wheel...unless of course you can't find that perfect lesson. Then it's time to move into the artist or architect mode. I serve on lots of committees in which I help to create experiences for kids, so there's when my point guard often comes out.

    The approach I least identify with is the hacker. I am definitely a rule-follower. The hacker-type actually makes me feel quite uncomfortable. I would say I have never thought of "those people" as creative types. I am hopeful that by looking through a different filter, I can appreciate their perspectives and be open to new ideas presented in what I would have previously called confrontation or tension.

    I look forward to learning about how to bring out these creative approaches in my students and helping them to see the benefit of collaborating with peers that may have strengths in a different approach as well.

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    1. Just like you, I was trying to find the area I would fit in. I kept looking at the titles, then read what it described and would try to find the type I fit into. I thought I closely fit the engineer type. Like you again, I am definitely not a hacker. I too am a rule follower and I have a hard time with the people who do not follow the rules. Sometimes I wish I could be like them... *L*

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  25. I'm a big believer in creation, so I was excited to read this chapter. Depending on my day (and the time I have), I can find myself in any of the 6 types. One of the things I love most about my current position (Instructional eCoach) is that through collaboration and working with my teachers, I get to experience parts of all 6 types of creative approaches to the classroom. I might help tweak a lesson or help design it from scratch. I might find a great resource and rework it for my building's needs. Or I might take an idea I have, bounce it off my colleagues, and develop something brand new! I think the one thing to keep in mind is that creativity doesn't have to be making it from start to finish - many "boring" tasks are completed in an entirely new and creative way. I think communication and collaboration are the two best ways to enhance creativity!

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  26. After reading this first chapter, I believe that everyone can be creative. I never knew that all of these approaches were considered creative. It helped me feel better about myself being creative. I feel that I fit in more than one approach. I feel I am part artist, geek, and engineer.

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    1. I was surprised at how many categories I fell into too.

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  27. We can all be creative if we allow ourselves to be. Sometimes that requires taking a risk, which can be scary. I identify most with the parts of the Geek and the Engineer that talk abut constantly tweaking. I usually cheat my original ideas from other people. Then the tweaking begins, often to the point where the original idea is barely recognizable in my finished (but always tweakable!) product.

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    1. I wish our schools and leaders would be more flexible and understanding in this area because it IS hard to try something new; especially if you're used to being met with negativity and "don't do that".

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  28. Interesting how the authors have developed these 6 different types of creative people. At first I wasn’t sure I was going to agree that there could be more than one creative type. After reading this chapter I am convinced of these 6 types and found myself thinking of where other teachers fit in and how easily I am fitting into more than one creative type.

    For obvious reasons, I am the artist, but I do see myself as an architect, engineer and point guard as well. The architect in me will seek out ideas from other teachers and put them to use in my classroom. The engineer in me might present a lesson during one period and then during the next period I might present it differently. Looking to fix what didn’t work during that class and making the change for the next. The point guard in me is constantly switching back and forth from one level of art student to the next. Assessing my surroundings and knowing what the next student might need help with or what direction to send them in next.

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    1. I found myself doing the exact same thing...the categories of the other teachers I work with (in fact there is one that is always saying..."Why reinvent the wheel") and how I don't fit into one place...I have a little bit of everything depending on the situation. I guess I feel like a creative mutt! lol!

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  29. I do think that everyone is creative, but I don't think that I am exactly any one of the six categories that the author mentioned. I definitely do not like to reinvent the wheel, so I would not consider myself an artist or an architect. I also need order in my classroom. Messy and I do not mix! I am also a rule follower, so I don't identify with the "Hacker".

    I would say that I am a mix of the "Geek", the "Engineer", or the "point Guard". I do like to look at my classroom data to focus on areas of concern with my students or to push the students that need a little nudge. I also know that if something isn't working in my classroom that it needs to be addressed. I like to think that I have differentiated my classroom for those that need it, and the end result for each student is the same. Success!

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  30. I decided I am The point Guard. At alternative school our students sometimes come into emergency situations and need to get a graduation asap.
    I'm constantly thinking on my feet to come up with ways on how we can achieve these graduation goals. Some times I'm climbing out of the box. And I really like my box.
    Some days I feel like a wedding planning trying to make everything come together perfectly all at the right moment.
    I do not see myself as creative at all. I always thought of it more of a skill than a type of creativity. But I'm open to the idea of it being a way to be creative.
    I liked in chapter 2 on page 35 where it states that being creative is a painful process. I can totally relate to that! I can see now from my point Guard description, that until the solution arrives I feel pressured to get to a solution. Its uncomfortable to be in the creative zone. But it feels good when you arrive at the solution. For example,when a student does follow my suggestions on how to get a graduation by a certain date, both the student and I are grinning like crazy.

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    1. I think I am the point guard too. But a little bit of a hacker, since I want to try new things that my colleagues are not into. I am the only staff member to have a very active twitter account to use as my PLN. I would enjoy integrating more social networking in my classes, but it is not something anyone else in the building does.

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  31. THIS. This chapter is what I needed to hear. I can totally get behind this thought, and I can champion this idea with my teachers. It's kind of ironic that we pigeonhole creativity in this rigid category of arts and crafts. I do believe we are all inherently creative, but some practice their gifts more than others.

    I think I'm a mix of the point guard and the engineer, but if I had to choose one I would be the engineer. I'm a point guard in my desire to provide personalized opportunities for staff and students. I thrive when given the opportunity to think on my feet and create learning opportunities in the moment that are individualized. My professional development style is what makes me more of an engineer. I am pretty reflective, and constantly thinking about how our current systems can be reworked and updated to be more successful. I'm doing this now with our personalized PD program at Achieve Virtual. I saw the flaws in a traditional PD system for this particular group, reworked it, and tried again. I've been very pleased with the ILP program and adjusting along the way (point guard). Next year's PD will be a revision (maybe small, maybe a huge revision like it was this year). I guess I'm a tinkerer of systems.

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    1. Just adding another comment because I forgot to click "Notify me" for updates. :-P

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  32. I would be really interested in hearing how you're making 'personalized PD' happen. We had the idea this year, but haven't been able to figure out the details!

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    1. Let's chat! Shoot me an email michele.eaton@wayne.k12.in.us. I'm happy to show you what I've done, what's working, what's not...

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  33. After reading this chapter and the different types of creativeness...I have found like many others that I don't seem to fit into 1 category perfectly. I am a creator...most of the things I do in my classroom are things that I have come up with to fit the needs of the kiddos and this may be tweaked from year to year...I LOVE pinterest! I often take an idea from there and make it my own in one way or another. So I guess I am an artisit, a geek, an architect, an engineer, a hacker, or a point gaurd. It just depends on the situation on what the class is needing or wanting or what is offered around me. I think my thoughts tend to go into so many directions. A silly example is I was asked to make a poster for a kids Valentine's Day party. I clicked on the pinterest link that was provided (pin the lips on Mrs. Valentine)...and I didn't like it. I then thought...I would could do pin the lips on the frog...still not happy. Then randomly I thought how about pin the lips on that teacher??!! I found a picture of that teacher...asked a graphic designer friend to create a poster for me with what I wanted...printed it out and made lips. The poster was a hit. But...it took 1 idea and was swirled around and with the help of a pinterest, a graphic designer, walgreens printing center, and google images I was able to make what I wanted.

    I feel that every school needs a little bit of every type of creative thinker. If we were all the same our days may get rather boring. Collaboration is such an important part of a school. In our school we have idea boards (now I work in a small private preschool so it is easy to have ideas posted)... we may try ideas and share what worked and what didn't or give an added touch to it and share that. The power of working together is often underestimated! 2 heads are better than 1!

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    1. Definitely need collaboration, or boring sets in. We have been working on so many things in our department, but are feeling stuck. We are hoping to plan a session of local teachers to share ideas. How great to meet 5 other teachers, and take 5 new ideas back to your classroom....each that can be adapted.

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    2. I love the idea of "idea boards"! It would be such an easy way for teachers to quickly pin up their ideas for everyone to see and immediately use. I think that collaboration and the sharing of ideas is so important. I definitely agree that two heads (or more) are better than one!

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  34. Before reading that chapter I would say no, not everyone is creative. I would include myself as someone who isn't creative. But, through reading it I would say that yes I do agree. I also see myself as the "geek-artist". I love to create things in/for my classroom. I'm constantly tweaking my lessons and trying to put a fun little flair on them but also changing things according to the previous results of teaching it that way.

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  35. Everybody does have some type of creativity. I don't think of myself as an innovative creator, but I'll see things and adapt them. I think that I am a cross between the Point Guard (constantly changing things as we go, adapting to the class personality, strengths, likes) and the architect (I never reinvent the wheel! - always find things to start with -usually online- and then make it mine. It needs to fit my personality of teaching and what I am comfortable with). Creative collaboration is so important. Another teacher and I went to a conference together this past summer. We try different things that we learned, discuss how we changed it, and if it worked or not.
    As mentioned in last week's discussion, so many of us are BUSY and finding TIME is so hard. This is why I don't reinvent the wheel. I take ideas, add or remove a spoke from it, and change the wheel up a bit. Sometimes what works for me, doesn't necessarily work for another teacher. We still share ideas and adapt. We get trapped in our classrooms at times, but by getting out and exploring our coworkers' creativity can make us more creative....we're all working with the same kids, so why not see what is working for them?

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    1. I think that this chapter has opened my eyes to the value of my colleagues' type of creativity ! I am going to take your post as a challenge to get out and re-connect with my co-workers.

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  36. I see myself mostly as the geek artist. I often look at things and think how could this be done differently with technology. I do find myself not wanting to reinvent the wheel but do it with a very very creative and technology flair. I use technology for my good but mostly for the students in my classes it is the technology generation
    I would agree that all of us are creative but that is to large degrees of variation. I do see creativity being a choice for the most part.

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    1. I agree that being creative IS a choice. That is very important!

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  37. I agree with the author's belief that everyone is creative in their own way. After reading this chapter, like so many others, I don't feel that I fall into one set category of creativity. I feel like the geek, as my classroom is data driven, as far as my flexible groupings go. I enjoy looking at data and tracking how students improve in different areas. I also feel like the engineer when I look at other ways to better help the kids in my classroom. If one certain way is not working, I go back to the drawing board and think about how I can make it better. I also feel like the point guard, constantly changing things based on my kids' personalities, strengths, and weaknesses. I never really though of myself as a really creative person before, but after reading this chapter I realize there is so much more to creativity. I feel like I am creative in the way I differentiate for my students, create a positive classroom environment, and interact with my students. We have no choice but to be creative! I am looking forward to learning how to increase my students' creativity in the classroom!

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    1. I see so many of us saying very much the same thing, which makes me feel validated that I have been more creative than I thought. I feel like I could have written your post word for word.

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  38. I think every teacher is creative in their own way. I think that I am a combination of the engineer and the point guard. I like to fix problems, like trying new things, and feel as a teacher that there is always a way I can get better. I also think I am like the point guard. I like to get creative with things in my class but also do this in small steps. I also come up with some of my most creative ideas while trying to fix something in the moment.

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    1. I totally understand what you mean because some of the most creative ideas come out of necessity. You need to change the lesson on the fly to cement understanding.

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  39. Yes I agree with the author that everyone is creative. Thankfully, because every single person is different, than our creativity shows in different ways. On the negative side, some people may not see what you're doing as "creative" and be critical and put teachers down instead. I feel as though I am am Engineer because I love finding a "wheel that already works". I feel it saves me time and is better for the students to have a more productive class, than the obvious "Oh Mrs Thompson is trying something else this week. She never seems to know what she is doing." Although I feel like an Engineer, I think other people see me as a "Hacker" because I personally have been criticized many times for trying something new, or not "conforming" to the way the school is "use to" - but I was never informed about expectations either {can't live up to unknown expectations, right?}

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    1. I hear you! I have integrated many new things that some teachers in my building have never heard of, such as Breakout boxes. I did one at our faculty retreat and they had a blast. We need more outside PD, so they can interact with other educators and get some fresh ideas!

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  40. I often think I am not creative because I am always taking other ideas and tweaking them - so I feel I identity as the Geek. I am very purposeful and want to know the why, and in turn want to explain to my students the "why" we are doing things. I constantly search for ideas online and pick other people's brains to take ideas and make them work for my students. Now, I realize I am creative, just in my own way. This will also help when encouraging my students in their own creativity. I often think of multiple intelligences, and this just adds a dimension to understanding how my students may think as designers. I often give choice when I do a project that enables creativity - usually thinking of multiple intelligences. Now, I will consider these types of creativity when designing and developing options for students to choose from.

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  41. I believe I am a combination of the Point Guard and the Hacker. Also, I believe every teacher has some sort of creativity that is innate to them. It is our job as educators to make ourselves creative. WIth the multitude of resources available to educators, there is no reason we can't "borrow" creative lesson plan ideas from others in our field.

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  42. I do agree with the author that all teachers are creative. Even though they may not know it, I see most of the teachers that I work we, do creative every day. I think that one way would be to differentiating lesson plans to fit your high, medium, and low student. Another way would be by working in spot and changing your lesson plans and you teach. I think that I would fall under 'the engineer's and "the geek". As a special needs teacher I'm all about data, and seeing what has and hasn't worked for my students. As for "the engineer" there is always tons of situations that I find myself dealing with and fixing daily. I have to think on the spot and have to comes up with ways to fix any sort of problems.

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  43. I am having a difficult time deciding which of the creative categories that I fit. I have always considered myself creative I like to make things and see the results of the project. I would say that I have a little of the Hacker and Point Guard. This helps when I need to change what we are doing mid lesson to fit the needs of the students.

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    1. I feel that I have all of them except that hacker and point guard. We would make a great team!

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  44. I totally agree with the authors that we, as educators, are all creative; the problem is-tapping into that center of creativity, and as they point out, we all don't "create" in the same way. The descriptions were interesting and as I continued to read, I got a little worried that I wasn't finding my category.
    Architect somewhat described me, but not totally. Then came point guard! Aha! That is me...a combination of Architect and Point Guard. As a building leader, so much of what I do fits into these two categories. One of my favorite passages from this chapter (pg. 35) said, "Creativity often stems from pain and conflict. It starts with problems we encounter and situations where time, resources, and information are limited." Doesn't that sound like every good educator that you know? Teachers show extraordinary creativity throughout their day; many of them just don't realize it!

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  45. I guess in order to answer the question if we are all creative - you have define creativity. This chapter does a great job describing different types of creativity rather that what my mind automatically goes to - The Artist.

    My mom says that she doesn't have a creative bone in her body but her being a retired teacher, at some point, she had to use creativity in the classroom. She isn't artsy at all which is what she equates with creative. So are we all creative? Probably, in some way. Those ways just look very different.

    I would identify the most with The Artist/The Geek/The Engineer. I definitely think most of us don't fit into one certain category. I am creative within the classroom with bulletin boards, reading areas (I had my husband construct mini-bleachers), some projects, etc. However, I am more often looking for and tweaking what others have already done and changing it to fit the needs of my classroom and students.

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    1. I love the idea of having the mini-bleachers in the classroom. To me that is extremely creative. Who would think of something like that. I think that when people say they are not creative that they typically are referring to not being very artsy. We are lost in translation with our terminology.

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    2. I also like the idea of mini-bleachers in the classroom. My students might even listen more! Gotta keep this idea for future consideration...

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  46. I feel I am creative at points during my lessons, but I always think of a teacher being creative that has awesome classroom set-ups or bulletin boards. They are more artsy. I would think of myself as the architect, where my students have to build from scratch. In my dance unit, they would have to make-up a dance with their choice of appropriate music and a routine to share with the class.

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  47. Oh, my. This has been tough to answer due to our smooth wall blockers, even from home! I just typed my response twice and keep hitting the wall. Third time is a charm.
    I absolutely loved seeing the authors cite my all-time favorite astronaut, Chris Hadfield. If you have never shown your students his videos from the ISS, you must look him up.
    I would say that I am most like what is described as the point guard and the architect in this chapter. While I enjoy creating new material, it's mostly based on my own boredom with the materials I've been using that sparks me to search for new ways to teach something.

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  48. I have always felt like people are creative we just are not all creative in the same way. I had a student once who hated typical school work, but when he got behind a computer and was able to design you saw passion. Creativity is not about sculpting and painting. It goes beyond. I have also seen a situation where students are given an outline of a design and told to pick three different colors. Then they all created the same picture just with different colors. To me that is not creativity. Its more of a carbon copy with colored filters.

    I feel like my creative type is engineer/ point guard. While I love to make things and create artistically, I enjoy improving what is already in practice. How can we make it better? What needs to go away to improve the project. I also feel like somethings just need to be experienced. Its not about the grade you get. I have my science students do debates 7th grade year. I want them to go through the process and learn how to make a sound argument. No one has ever failed the assignment. I have, however, seen students step out of their shells. Some students thrive in debate type situations. It gives students the opportunity to research a topic before diving in and arguing a point. It is a great experience for them.

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    1. I feel like the point guard too! I juggle so many hats, since I teach 5 different subjects, so I am always looking for different ways to approach the subject matter so that my students are engaged. I want them to love Biology, so I try to relate it to "real world" examples.

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  49. I agree that everyone is creative in one way or another. If I had more time in a day, I'm not sure what I'd produce. I think I am an engineer. I am always looking for an alternative way to teach my students. I like to pick up lesson plans or activities that are already prepared and tweak them to fit my needs. I change my plans on a yearly basis. I feel like I change things up depending on the students that are in my room for the year. Each of these students are creative in their own way, just like me. I try to cover all of their personalities by using different activities. I also have a bit of artist in me. I like to create my own activities and interactive bulletin boards that bring out the students' creativity. I just don't have the time to be an artist all of the time. My summers are spent thinking and producing new and exciting things...sometimes!

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    1. I agree. When I was teaching (I am a district media specialist now), I would often use already existing lessons as a jumping off point for "creativity." And much of my focus was spend on figuring out ways to let the students develop and showcase their own creative thinking/problem solving skills. Presently I'm working on bringing more STEAM programs to our district. The high school is tough because we are in a small space with no place to put large pieces of equipment like a 3d printer etc. I just found the 3Doodler pens and am thinking this might be a great solution! I'm also thinking that art classes, architecture and building trades could benefit from this tool as well.

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    2. Hi Megan! I'm excited that you are planning to incorporate more STEM projects. I too, am interested in that too. Jennifer, I agree with your statement "I change things up depending on the students ...in my room". I like that this book states that creativity involves structure. I like to set up a structure but I like to re-create activities every year to fit my students unique needs.

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  50. I do believe that all teachers are creative whether they know it or not. I have always thought of myself as a problem solver rather than creative. My room was never decorated incredibly well because I didn't care and I wasn't good at it. However, as an "engineer" and architect type creative person, I see that developing dynamic lessons within the confines of a curriculum map or pre-selected texts that I was creative. Constantly trying to fix problems- like getting students to read and developing new ways of tackling texts and making inherently dull content (to a teenager) exciting is creative in its own right.

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    1. I can relate! Making sure we are intentional in what we ask students to do to ensure the outcomes we desire at the correct level of proficiency are accomplished according to the timelines prescribed is not only creative, it is magical! Teachers are all of these types of creative and more! i just wish that we were all honored and described as valuable, rather than challenged and criticized as much as we are for "failing America's children." Maybe, we would not have gotten away from being creative and pursuing our passions in the first place.

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  51. After reading about the different types of creative teachers, I mostly identified with the Engineer. I tend to take the resources that are already available and in place, and then, I try to fix what I see as a problem within them or improve them. I also felt like I am at times the Point Guard. My students can earn movie theater tickets for following our classroom rules, and they can turn them in for rewards. I was teaching tens and one, and I decided to use the tickets as a real life connection for them. They loved the activity and got a good grasp on grouping ones into groups of tens and ones! Seeing them work with the tickets seemed to go much more successfully than using a worksheet or "normal" math manipulatives.

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    1. Shae, I just smiled when I read your post. I read it right after posting mine and I identify with the same two types as you do.

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  52. When I first read the question for the week asking if we agree that all people are creative I right away thought, of course. Then as I was reading the chapter and learning about the 6 types of creative people I became frustrated in trying to figure out what type of creative person I was. I know that I can be creative yet could not figure out which type I relate with so I went back and read them again. I think I identify the most with the Engineer type. I like to look at other people's ideas and tweek them to fit my own situation and creative outlet.
    The more I thought about creative types the more I agree with what the author says..."It's pretty common for people to identify with more than one type of creative approach.....That's totally normal. It's also appropriate to use different approaches depending upon the situation." I tend to see life as a mixing of ideas and that things are not just black and white. We can't and shouldn't place people or ideas in just one 'box' or type.
    When I am planning for activities in the library I often will look for ideas in books or online. I take these ideas and make them my own by adding or taking away from the original. I create a plan that will work for my students and for the time that I have to carry out the activities.

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  53. I love the 6 different types of creative teachers. I view myself as a creative "geek". I love analyzing what works and what doesn't and try to find a unique approach to motivate students to love math. I am excited about this book study as I have really wanted to let my creative thoughts out again as they receded like a turtle in a shell when the "directives" for teaching to the test appeared. When I started teaching, oh so long ago, I worked with a "hacker" who I thought was amazing. He really responded to everything with a challenge. He upset the administration, but his viewpoint was super critical in the "why are we doing this" area. He challenged the "why" and forced people to really think about "what" we are doing to students. I was in my first years of teaching and although his "creative" approach to education was viewed negatively, like our book mentions, his viewpoints really helped me shape my "why" when I engage with students.

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  54. I tend to agree with the author that we are all creative. I find myself having a difficult time trying to decide which of the six types they mentioned would describe me. I could see myself as a point guard when I look at the makeup of my classes. I have a mixture of students including ENL, resource, and different grade levels. To be able to score with all of them I have to make sure they all can play the game. I also feel like an engineer sometimes. I am constantly redesigning projects for out in the shop. I want to make sure the kids can get the most out of their shop time. After looking at all the different types of creativity I have come to the conclusion that it takes a mixture of all of them to be able to connect with the students that I work with.

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  55. I have to admit, I was one of those that thought I did not have a creative bone in my body. It is something I feel as an administrator I need to work on. I also feel as an administrator, we need to be a little of all of them depending on what we might be dealing with at that time.
    As a former middle school math teacher I did not think I was creative at all. Having read this section, I now see where I was (at times) creative to help create that student learning in the classroom. For my middle school students we did not have foreign language, so I always told them my class was as close to a foreign language as they were going to take. It was up to me to help create that learning experience for them.

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  56. What spoke to me as an English teacher is the idea that "creativity begins on paper with thoughts to share, develop, prototype...." I am that type of creator. As I listen or read, I attempt to "create order from chaos" by organizing what I understand into some sort of framework that I can build onto.

    Similar to the "Geek", I explore existing models and examine the data for their effectiveness. I question why things work well...or don't...to inform the decisions I make in the future. I work well with the type of creator "Artist" who can go beyond the confines of what has been and help me reinvent something better.

    In the same way that I use DeBono's 6 Hats of Thinking as a lens for students to comprehend, I will use these Creative Approaches as a way for them to see themselves and stretch themselves to think differently. All of us can benefit from more tools to respond to life-situations, while complementing the skill-sets of those with whom we work.

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  57. I really enjoyed reading about the variety of ways to be a creative teacher/thinker. When I started reading about the artist teacher I thought, "whoa this is so me!" and then I got to the geek teacher and changed my mind. I found myself placing teachers that I know into the different categories, which just confirms that there is creativity in all of us. I already feel inspired with what I have read thus far, and I'm only through chapter two!
    I would like to challenge myself to include more varieties of creativity in my lessons to help inspire the multitude of personalities and creative awareness of each of my students. The fact that I couldn't identify exactly which creative category I relate to most (I kept changing my mind every time I read about a new one) shows that I should be embracing all of them to better my students.

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  58. Elizabeth Stracener (Richmond, IN)
    I agree with the author that we are all creative in out own way. We all have different personalities and have to come up with creative solutions on a daily basis. For example, one day I had great online activities planned, and the internet was giving me fits, so plan B had to be utilized on the fly!

    I think that I probably am the point guard. i enjoy making things and use Legos often to make models of the subject at hand. My students really enjoy using Legos and building models. Other days, we play online review games, or make board games using the subject material. I am also looking to gamify some of my classes. I just feel overwhelmed sometimes, since I have 5 preps and am on the run!

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  59. As I read the different classifications given by the author, I had to reread the descriptions to feel that I really understood what was being said. I would have to say that I have never really considered myself as creative because though I like dabbing into artistic thoughts I don't necessarily like putting myself out there. As I read them again, I feel that I would pretty much be classified as an engineer/hacker. I generally watch what others are doing, analyze it, and use what I can for my situation. So many students are afraid to learn math or feel that they are not capable of doing it. This make it necessary for me to analyze what their difficult areas are and ways to help them understand how to progress in solving the problem.

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  60. In the environment I teach in, Project-Based Learning, I find that my creative approach to my lessons is more apparent, yet difficult to pull off. I view myself as an artist. I am usually one who will shy away from the "data-driven" approaches because I struggle to see how that works best for students at times. As I teach English, I want students to grow their love for literature and to find what intrigues them most about reading. As a Social Studies teacher, I want students to recognize the world they live in today and to begin thinking critically about things and to begin to develop their own thoughts about the world. The most intriguing thought about this chapter is to reflect on those who teach around me and to try and see how they fit. I work in a very collaborative environment and I find it to be very true that we need every different type of creative person to make our work meaningful for students.

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  61. I love and agree with the idea that all of us are creative. I can see different collegues that I have worked with over the years fall into the different categories as well as students that I have had. It is not always as cut and dry to characterize someone's creativity and I see pieces of myself in several different categories. It does make the idea of using creativity in your classroom less intimidating to realize that creativity doesn't have to look a certain way. It also provides encouragement that even students who don't fall into the more traditional "artist" category can have their creativity tapped in a way that is comfortable and meaningful to them.

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  62. I see myself as the artist, the geek, the architect and the engineer. I love to change up the routine and build and create new lessons or better lessons that engage and empower my students. We all need to get out of routine now and then.

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  63. I relate mostly to the engineer. I love to search and piece together parts to make a lesson whole. I use standards or a series scope and sequence as a starting point to springboard from. While I don't like to invent the wheel, I like to take a little of this and a little of that to make a lesson whole. I also have a teeny bit of hacker in me. At the first part of the description I didn't relate to hacker at all. The example of the 5pt font terrified me, but in the sense of always asking how a process could be improved I was able to relate. I am always looking at models and thinking of how to be more efficient or beneficial for students. I also related a lot to the point guard. As a media & instructional technology specialist, I'm often in the classroom co-teaching or modeling a lesson. The on the fly decision making of what to demonstrate to a class often changes drastically from the conversations I have with the teacher ahead of time to delivery in the moment. With PD that I offer to teachers, I have to mold what I see them doing and what I feel they need and this is the role of the point guard.
    My creativity comes out in the classroom often as I'm called in to model deeper thinking and creation projects with students. With the technology coach portion of my job, I'm always challenging teachers to think of how students can demonstrate their knowledge and helping them with projects to accomplish this. The library portion of my job also allows me lots of creativity as I design motivational reading challenges, author visits, etc.

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  64. I always identified creative with the teachers who seem the most artistic. You know the ones with the eye catching bulletin boards and cute things they drew themselves. I envy them and had always wished I could be more creative. Now I can see how I'm just as creative in a different way. I believe I'm more of a Geeky Engineer Point Guard. I'm usually quick on my feet changing or tweaking lessons as I'm teaching based on students needs and a desired outcome. I'm the one constantly looking at what everyone else is doing and then tweaking it to meet the needs of my students. I always want to know how and why things work and encourage my students to do the same. I enjoy finding solutions to any obstacle we come across. Where there is a will there is a way. One of my favorite creative aha moments was with a student who was constantly misbehaving. I was getting ready to start our reading group, but instead had him run the reading group. Instead of misbehaving he was engaged. He helped his peers and he even explained to another student why one of the rules was important to follow. Teaching win.
    Most of the time the problem solver in me gets viewed as being flexible. Something gets changed or added to the day by administration, students, or whomever and I can easily adjust and maneuver to make it work.
    One of my favorite things we did when I taught first grade at a larger school was that we collaborated and built units together for our students. When all six of us teachers were able to work together and combine the different ways we were creative, the students benefited the most.

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  65. Chapter 2 was an interesting read. I would classify myself as a "Geeky Engineer." I like to look at ("accurate and meaningful") data to monitor effectiveness. I'm also always looking for ways to add something new to my lessons. However, I don't necessarily feel the need to create lessons from scratch. I like to search out great resources.
    As I read through the various descriptions, it was fun to classify my coworkers into the categories. It was also important to note that schools need diversity. I thought the author made an important point in that "... schools need every type of creative teacher. When schools embrace all types of creative teachers, we are able to build the kinds of learning environments our students deserve ."

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  66. I see a little bit of myself in each of the creative types described in this chapter (like so many others). However, I definitely lean toward the engineer in most situations. There are so many resources for teachers to use and build upon. I usually take an idea/lesson that I've seen somewhere and modify it to fit my students' needs. This saves me time and energy that I can put towards some other project that I'm working on. I tend to use the internet and resource books for lesson plans and use collaboration with other teachers for classroom management ideas. As teachers, we are constantly tweaking all of our ideas and lessons to fit the needs of our current students and classrooms.

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    1. Trina, I think this is a great way to teach. Using ideas and lessons from other teachers reminds me of..."Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery." Then taking that idea and tweaking it to fit your subject and students is wonderfully creative. I don't know what I'd do without the wonderful minds of my colleagues! (And I pretty much wrote the same thing in my answer) :)

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    2. Trina and Michelle,
      I too appear to be like you ladies. I will look online or work with a other teachers and tweak a lesson that I think would work with my students.

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  67. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  68. I feel like I am a creative type but had a hard time fitting into one specific category . This could be because I do not really do things the same way from one quarter to the next. I love to learn new ways of doing things and incorporate new ideas to teach my curriculum so my students can be motivated but also to motivate me to be excited to teach. I favor the Artist and the Engineer. I love to create from scratch and I love to find ideas on Pinterest and other online sources such as a FACS group page on fb. I want to learn how to use the launch system in my classroom to add organization to my student driven projects and give my students a structure to help them reach their goals. I loved the analogy of the Apollo mission and problem solving involving a team of people working together. I also agree that sometimes it is messy and confusing to use creativity in the classroom but the learning
    process is so much more exciting.

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  69. Some of the most significant conversations I've had with my last two principals is how every teacher brings with them a different set of gifts with how we view our students and with how we teach...and a school thrives with teachers of all types of gifts. One teacher may be gifted with lecturing, another with leading discussions and another with creating a sense of value for each student. The point is, we need them all and all of them use creativity in different ways.

    It truly does take a village to raise (teach) a child.

    I like the line from the book, "...there is no single creative type. There are many creative types who offer unique gifts - all of which can transform learning and spark innovation."

    After reading though all of the creative approaches, I tend to identify best as an artistic hacker. I love creating brand new ways in which to bring a concept home to my students...and I often borrow in part from my fellow colleagues. For example there was a teacher, who has since retired, that created a "Just Because" project, where each student researched and presented a topic that was purely of their choosing. This was for a math class. I tweaked that for a speech class I teach, where the emphasis is on taking risks and living life fully. So the student researches and choses something they've always wanted to do (go sky diving, eat a Chicago style pizza in Chicago, go to major league baseball game with their dad, etc) and plan the steps to make that happen and they make it happen. They present these projects after a few months in a way that fits their project. What a joy it is to see their wings spread. The saddest thing I've noticed is that many don't have any clue what they've always wanted to do..they are so used to doing what they're told. But after some gentle prodding and ideas, soon the lights go on in their eyes. I'm a hacker in that I can easily put myself in my students' shoes. While I don't begrudge the teacher that wants their students to know all the details of seemingly meaningless facts (ie what was the name of Odysseus's dog?), because we need all types of teachers, I would much rather have my students learn to identify more with a character's psyche and how they deal with challenges, etc. So I tweaked an idea from a student teacher. She had the students come up with playlists for certain characters that we read about, where they would list the top ten songs on these characters' playlists. I added to this by having them include written reasons for each song along with pictures and video. I love to create and to be a little "rebellious" (in the eyes of those who think I relate too much with students which may well be true) but I cannot do this without the help, or collaboration, of others. This brings me full circle to the beginning...we all have different gifts and we need them all.

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    1. I love what you do with your speech class. I had a friend who use to do Senior projects out in Oregon. They had to choose something out of their comfort zone, something they might have wanted to do, but really never thought they'd be able to do it. Then they work the school year on it, at the end they had to do oral boards and show cased their creativity to the public. It was pretty awesome to see what the students came up with.
      I am a math teacher, I am curious what the math project was? Do you have the concept and could you share?

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    2. Hi Sandra! I keep forgetting to hit the notify button so I'm sorry it took so long to reply. The math project that the math teacher used really wasn't a "math" project. He did it with is math students and he literally let them go wherever they wanted with this project! I suppose if you were more comfortable with your students doing something math-related, you could put some type of guidelines in place...for instance, their project has to have something to do with numbers. This way, you could get the math part in but the students could still go just about anywhere with what they want to study because I think numbers could be involved with anything!

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  70. As I read through this chapter, I saw myself as a little bit of each of the creative types, but after further reflection, I think I am mostly an engineer. I usually take ideas from other teachers, websites, pinterest, etc. and shape them to fit my classroom. I remember seeing my younger sister creating a Facebook page for a literary character when she was in high school, so when I got my first teaching job, I took that idea and turned it into a Roman Emperor Facebook page. Additionally, at my school, we have collaboration once a week, and we've started share more activity and lesson ideas. With these new ideas as a basis, I modify it to fit into my classroom for that next week, such as Google Slides activities. I try to use ideas quickly, so that I do not forget them, and that usually turns out well. New lessons and technology always have a learning curve, so I figure I might as well jump in and try it out sooner rather than later! As I reread through the engineer section, I remembered a great saying my dad still says, "Work smarter, not harder," and I think that help sums up my mentality behind being an engineer.

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    1. I had to laugh as I went back to read peoples comments. I see your dad and my Sped. Coordinator thing alike. She always tells us that we should "work smarter, and not harder."

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  71. As I read this and thought of the creativity of my team, I visioned all of us in baseball jerseys with names on our back such as "artist", "geek", "architect", etc. As educators we do not have a choice except to be creative. No, we are not all the art teacher that we think of when we think of creativity or the amazing scrapbooker that can transform a bulletin board to a piece of art. However, we all have our own gift.

    I consider myself an "architect". I like structure and data but I also like to find a creative way to get to the end point. Data is boring to kids but when I can help the kids find a way to learn material that is interesting and exciting, it allows the youth to find learning as an opportunity to grow instead of something that they have to do just to get a grade.

    I often remind students that as an educator I was not paid to entertain -- otherwise I would live in Hollywood. However, it is my job to teach them how to learn. Through my creative skills, I hope to teach children to love the learning process.

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  72. I definitely agree that we all have the ABILITY to be creative in one way or another. I do think that many times our creativity does not come to fruition or there are obstacles to our taking chances (such as what we read about in Chapter 1), but the ability is there.

    Personally, I identify most with the Artist (#1) and the Engineer (#4), which I suppose seems a bit contradictory. I think I was much more the Artist at the beginning of my career when I was really excited to try new things and didn’t mind putting in 60+ hours of work a week. I always wanted to make sure the students were engaged, and I didn’t want them bored because I had just finished being a student myself. Although, I’m not totally sure that sometimes my creative lessons were more fun rather than learning. I feel like nowadays I relate more with the Engineer. I absolutely still want students engaged, but I’m much less likely to want to start everything from scratch. I like collaborating with other teachers and tinkering with current lessons to design best practices.

    As an example, one of my favorite “creative” lessons is not one that I personally created at all, but one that a coworker created that I continue to implement every year and adapt to current students and events. When we read 'Cry, the Beloved Country' by Alan Paton, which takes place in 1940’s South Africa, we engage in a real-life approach to learning about the Pass Laws of Apartheid. Students are randomly assigned certain stairwells that they cannot use during the unit unless they have a Pass (just like blacks had to have a passbook to prove they were allowed to be in certain areas during Apartheid). If they are discovered in an area that is off limits, they have small ‘punishments’ (such as reflecting about why they disobeyed the pass laws or research current laws that are unjust, etc). While in comparison to the real pass laws of South Africa, obviously this is minor, but it does give them a peek into what it would be like to be targeted and have to adjust their daily schedules or be in fear for their lives. It’s an activity that is usually done in May when everything is getting stressful before finals and testing, and I’m always tempted to skip it to make sure we have time for the “real stuff.” But I’m always glad that I make time for it because it proves to be a memorable and real life learning experience.

    Lastly, regarding the six types, I’ll be honest: I envy the Hackers (#5) and aspire to have their courage. They are the teachers that everyone remembers later in life. And they don’t always remember the content of what was taught, but they remember LEARNING and finding meaning in the process. While it’s always wonderful to be the teacher that gets remembered later on, that of course isn’t the goal. But while I hear other teachers complaining about a hacker, I secretly envy their daring.

    Sorry for the length of this post: I really liked this prompt ;)

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  73. I do agree with the author that we are all creative but we can be creative in different ways. This creativity can be fueled by working with other people to be innovative or to solve problems like with the problem on Apollo 13. I really never have felt that I have a creative bone in my body. I do not fit any certain type that the author described. I'm more of a melting pot of The Brain Boost, The Hacker, and The Point Guard if I was to try and pin point some of my characteristics. Many times I have an Ah Ha moment when trying to fall asleep at night. I love my first grade team and we are always bouncing ideas off of one another to find ways to help our students learn(that fit their individual learning styles) and the solve problems that may arise. I'm excited to keep reading because The Launch Cycle sounds interesting.

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  74. I think we are all born with some level of creativity. I think I have always been an artist. I like creating an environment that appeals to all of our senses- a place where others want to be.

    I have been in a couple of rooms at my school that must belong to creative teachers, people who value aesthetics too, and when I visit their classrooms, I think to myself. "I really want to stay in this room." This is the reaction that I want students to have when they walk into my classroom.

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    1. Exactly! A creative environment invites students to learn and makes them want to return for more. As an adult I feel the same way. Whether it be a classroom or a home - a nurturing, inviting, freedom from the fear of failing, safe environment will allow students to explore their strengths and develop new ones.

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  75. After reading this chapter, I kept looking for the creative person I was. I have never thought of myself as a creative person, then I figured out that creativity is just not an artsy type person. I really couldn't pinpoint the type I was, but if I had to pick one.. I'd say I am an engineer. I work in the special ed field and my Sped Coordinator has always told us when working on IEP's to "work smarter, not harder." So, just like the engineer, I can find things that other people have done and then work to turn it into something I can use in my own classroom. I really thought I would be an architect, because I deal with data so much in my IEP's, but that didn't feel right with me.
    I am glad I am reading this book. I really like the idea of finding my creativity and I am ready to "LAUNCH" in my classroom. I loved the mnemonic and what each letter represents. I teach math, and I would really love to find a way to have this work in my classroom. I can't wait to see what each chapter brings.

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  76. I enjoyed this chapter and, like many, find myself to be a combination of the six types the authors mention. As a building administrator, it was interesting to read each of the creative descriptions and to think about which teachers in the building "fit" in each category. There are some really great teachers at my school and it is very interesting how certain grade-level teams are comprised of a mixture of the descriptions given in Chapter 2.

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  77. Before reading this chapter, I would have answered....NO, not everyone is creative. I myself would not have put myself into any creative category as most of my pinterest attempts are fails and laughable at best. However, after reading this chapter my answer has changed to YES, everyone can be ceative....even me! AFter learning about the artist, geek, architect, engineer, hacker, and point guard I am going to put myself into a couple of categories. First, as the point guard because while teaching first grade I saw the importance of phonics, but did not always agree that the lessons provided connected with 6 and 7 year olds. I found ways to make up my own songs/rhymes and even characters to help the new readers learn sounds, diagraphs, and blends. It did stick with them and I certainly enjoyed teaching it that way. Phonics isn't the only times I've done that, but it certainly came to mind and before reading this I would not have labeled it creative. I may also fall into the geek category as I also find myself looking for ways to tweek and change old ideas to make them more relevant. I'm standing a little taller now knowing I am, indeed, creative. :)

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    1. I agree with you! I never thought I had a creative bone in my body. I always know what I want to do but do not have much creativity to complete it. I am creative but in a different way than what I thought it meant to be creative. I am a motivator, organizer, have flexibility, a leader, etc. which is being creative in its own way.

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  78. It doesn’t surprise me that I fit into the categories of artist and engineer. In my classroom I create different ways to work with Spanish grammar, vocabulary, and culture, from slideshows, hyperdocs, games, partner activities, skits, and quick crafts. We collect pictures, sing songs, race each other to create verbs and sentences, draw what we hear, and speak to each other using props. I am always on the lookout for different methods to come at the same subject. I often have no choice other than to make something up myself, but sometimes I can find something useful online to tweak instead of recreating the wheel. Being the only Spanish teacher in my school, I don’t always have someone to bounce ideas off of in person, but now there are people I can reach through Twitter and sites online.

    What is important to me is if the activity I choose works for the specific group of kids. What do they need? What will they get out of it? What do I already have that I can use or change? Can I do something completely different that will engage them more? And yes, sometimes I spend a lot of my vacation time doing “school stuff.” But it’s one of my favorite hobbies, so I’m happy and having fun the same way some people are when they do scrap booking or play sports.

    I think as educators we all have to create and recreate.

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  79. I am the teacher who loves to create materials and projects completely from scratch. Why use someone else's "stuff" when I can design my own materials to best meet the needs of my students and myself?! I do, at times, consider structure to hamper my students creativity, as well as my own. While it takes a certain degree of structure to maintain a well-organized, free-flowing classroom where tasks are completed, my classroom is noisy, messy, and occasionally chaotic. However, the product produced is worth the experience of student-driven, inquisitive, product-producing, interactive learning. It is the type of learning that stays with my students for the rest of their lives and translates into their future careers.

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    1. Sounds like the type of classroom I would have loved as a student. I bet your lessons are very creative, and students get a lot out of your lessons.

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  80. I most naturally fit into the artist category. I've always loved to recreate the wheel. I appreciated the comment made in this chapter that sometimes, the phrase "creative type" is used to be critical of others. As a classroom teacher, there were times that I faced harsh criticism because some assumed that because I tried to build a creative environment in my classroom, I was simply "having fun" rather than focusing on a rigorous classroom. In my current role, I want to use the architect lens more often.

    Reflecting, I will admit that at times in my classroom, I did more of the creating than my students were doing. I always felt this immense pressure to come up with something great and really wow my students with an engaging learning experience. Now, I think back to how many opportunities were missed. If I had simply shifted my way of thinking a bit, all of those opportunities could have been given to my students. Why do I need to create a really great experience when I could have done it with my students? Better yet- I could have provided more opportunities for my students to create the experience as they learned- with me as support.

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  81. As I began reading Chapter 2, I was not sure if I would completely fit into one of the creative approaches. Once I read the creative approach called the point guard I knew that fit me perfectly. My goal in teaching is to make a difference with my students. I can look at things in a different perspective and see the entire picture of what I want to do. Because of this, I reach out to a colleague of mine who is "The Artist" and we work well together to accomplish what we need to do to best help our students. In my classroom I have students that work at different speeds, have different abilities, come from many different home environments, and more but I know how important it is for me to help them thrive and be successful in my classroom.

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  82. After reading chapter 2, I didn't feel like I fit perfectly into any creative category. However, I can probably relate most to "The Geek". I find the "why" of the situation interesting, and though I wouldn't say I'm necessarily data-driven, I find data useful when it comes to how I can tweak my teaching to improve how well my students understand concepts.

    The great thing about giving kids the freedom to be more creative, is that it allows them to truly show what they know without just guessing the answer on a true/false or multiple choice test. It forces them to write, draw, or create a way to show what they know. It's difficult to "fake" that type of knowledge.

    When reading the description of "The Geek", I would also definitely agree that my creativity doesn't always have the same "artistic flair" that "The Artists" do, but I certainly try! :)

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  83. I'm finally caught up reading! I think I fit somewhere between "The Geek" and "The Architect".

    I do think all teachers are creative (at least the ones I have worked with). The thing that stuck out to me the most was on page 46 where he talked about how if everyone was the same type of teacher we would be lacking in many areas. That is so true, and helps me realize the importance of our students having different types of teachers for the balance it provides.

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    1. That also stuck out for me too. I know I have always told my own kids, how boring life would be if we were all the same. This author nailed it on the head when he talked about teachers being the same way. I bounce off my coworkers & we share ideas. If we all taught the same we certainly wouldn't be able to do that.

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  84. After reading through this chapter, I am rethinking my definition of "creative." My original definition was exactly what they assumed it was. I defined creativity as those who are artistic and create new and unique works. After looking at their definition of creativity, I would agree that all teachers are creative. We all adapt to our individual environments, students and subjects. However, I still think there are teachers that are much less creative than others. I have encountered many teachers that are content with using the same systems year after year, with minimal use of in-depth or creative thinking.
    I really identify most closely with the Engineer. I am always on the lookout for ideas and resources that work well. When I find a system that works, I like using it as best I can. When I find a system that works well, I will try to improve upon it, figuring out how to better make it work for my students. I also identify a bit with the Artist, as I like creating new ideas from scratch, as I create many of my lessons off of my own resources and knowledge.
    As an example, when teaching my students about archaeology, I found a lesson where a teacher gave their students examples of objects found at an archaeological dig, and had them answer questions about what could be gleaned from those items. Instead, I brought in a variety of items from people's trash, and had the students work in groups to brainstorm what they could learn about their "civilization" from the items in their box. With most of these items being common things they would encounter in their daily lives, it made them easier for the students to relate to. This helped them see how archaeologists can learn from certain objects.

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  85. Yes I do believe we are all creative in a certain way. I believe all of us fit into one of the 6 categories. I am one of those people that wish I was more creative. For example I find things I want to make, I get the stuff, & my item doesn't even come remotely close to the example I was given. I feel as much as this frustrates me it also keeps me in check as a teacher. I, of course, want my students to learn everything I teach them & not all of them do, but the ones that do might've had to think of a different way to learn what I taught them. Creativity is important in so many ways. I like to think of it as the spice of life. I want to do whatever it takes to help my children succeed.

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  86. I agree with the authors that we are all creative in our own way. I feel as though I am creative when I am inspired by others or things that are happening around me. I often consult YouTube when trying to come up with new ideas in the classroom. My largest inspiration comes from my daughter Meya. She always has all kinds of great ideas for me to implement in my classroom. It sounds terrible but I also sometimes steal her toys to work with the kids. I also consult with social media and other professionals in my domain in order to come up with good fresh ideas. This is especially true in physical education class. Kids tend to get bored with the same old sports and it is fun to occasionally come up with a new game.

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    1. I think it is great that you are inspired by your daughter! When I coached softball, we also tried to come up with new games for the players for team building and warm ups.

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    2. I love this! I do the same thing. I teach Kindergarten and I have a son in first grade and a daughter who will start K next year. They are a great resource!
      My son even creates lessons for me to teach "the kids". He feels he's an expert, now that he's in first grade!

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  87. I feel that creativity comes about for those who are willing to take risks, and turn things "upside down to offer a new alternative. That categorizes me as "the Hacker." While this was disconcerting in the sense that this person is perceived as destructive, I related to the interpretation that this category isn't fixing what is broken, but instead is finding a different way to use the current system. Once I get to know the students as individuals, and not just a class period, I make an attempt to find alternatives that will work best to show off their individual creativity and not worry if their approach wasn't the same as the others. While I don't agree with not following rules, I do believe in adapting the more stringent rules to something that is geared more to that particular class versus another. Dynamics in some classes are better suited to strictness, whereas others benefit from being given the opportunity of setting up different angles that benefit the whole class and allows them to take ownership of their experiences. This approach places me in the "point guard" category because I encourage my students to think differently and see the experience and results from a new perspective. Do I collaborate and search out new ideas from my colleagues? Absolutely! When we are given the opportunity to meet, we appreciate how everyone possesses different talents and skills that when put together, result in more creative results.

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  88. I do believe that we are all creative. I believe we all have different ways of showing it, which I thought the authors did a great job explaining! I actually chuckled out loud while reading this chapter. The Geek fit me to a tee! At first, I thought the Artist was pretty true in some aspects, however, once I read the Geek-I instantly knew where I fit. The BEST co-worker I have ever had was an Artist type and we were so great together! I could never figure out exactly why, but this chapter truly made sense of it. I love being able to look at data, analysis it, and then tweek my teaching based on my findings. I strive to see a difference in my student's learning and love seeing it in numbers and data!

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    1. I failed to say in my own post that I do believe everyone is creative too. I work with a teacher that loves the data driven analysis as you do. I think it is great! I wish I were more like that. Yes, I look over the data and find it to be overwhelming and hard to see the big picture until I can break it down. Then breaking it down almost makes things worse for me. I guess numbers are just not my thing. That is what makes our students' learning all the better, that we are each so different in our thinking and creating.

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    2. Yes! I LOVE our otherwise hated data wall! I want to analyze WHY students are where they are and HOW to move them up. I really get excited to do running records on my Kinders. I want to see how they are doing, what they are doing, and where to go with them, next!

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    3. I could not agree more! I am more of an artist type myself, and one of my coworkers on my team is definitely the Geek type. She balances me out and we just work together perfectly. She loves analyzing data to help improve both our practices.

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  89. Boy, while I was reading the creative types, I didn't really feel that I was going to fit into any of them. I am probably a mixture between #4, the Engineer, and #6, the Point Guard. I am definitely more interested in "how" things work verses "why". But more than that I really don't every like to reinvent the wheel. I see myself as a "tweeker". I like to take a great idea and adapted for my classroom. The Point Guard and the Engineer neither really see themselves as the creative type. The Point Guard can change in a moments notice and I can relate very well to that. I believe I am creative, but often times find my creativity hard to incorporate while staying in line with the standards. This year more than ever, I have found myself being dramatic as I am presenting. Sometimes when I reflect on the day's lessons, I am wondering what these kids could possibly be telling mom and dad about my dramatizations to make a point. I hope and pray that the students see it as a memorable way to understand a concept when this happens.

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  90. I've always considered myself crafty, but not super creative. I'm able to replicate things others have made fairly well, but coming up with things from scratch is often a daunting task for me. After reading the 6 types, I find myself to be a mix of at least 3. The hacker in me likes to take things that aren't working and make them work. Being at a Deaf school, we all have to be hackers to some extent. A majority of curriculums and materials are designed for students that can hear and speak. We are constantly hacking the "broken" parts of those systems to make them work better for our students. The engineer in me loves solving problems. In my position as a tech specialist, I am charged with solving problems all day everyday. When I can create a solution to help a teacher meet a need or accomplish a goal, it is a great day. The geek (or maybe wannabe geek) in me loves structure. My brain is in a constant state of go in 42 directions and structures keep me focused and help me to see accomplishments in the messiest of months. Because my position was created when I accepted it 4 years ago, I've had to create a lot of structure and frameworks for myself. Sometimes I'm successful, and other times I recreate it every year. My creativity is definitely messy and chaotic, but my constant craving for the security of structure and problem solving keeps it all functioning.

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  91. Every teacher is creative! How can you not be. Now, we are not all creative in the same way or to the same degree, but we are constantly creating ways to engage and teach our students in class. Even those teachers that don't feel very creative need to give themselves more credit. When I compare our profession with that of many others, I feel pretty confident that teachers are VERY creative. Now, as for me, I think there are pieces of several creative approaches going on. The Hacker speaks to me as I have taken many a lesson plan or project and tore it down to create something that works for me and my students. I follow many rules but have been known to break a few. The Engineer fixes problems they see. I often look at old lessons, see problems, and then create new and improved lessons, and I certainly look to the how over the why things work. In my coaching, I would have to say the Point Guard comes out in me. I constantly look for the best opportunities for my athletes so that they can compete at their optimum level. In any of these situations, I try to get my students or athletes to see that they possess those important skills and talents the book was mentioning.

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  92. I enjoyed reading about the different creative types. While I think I am kind of a hacker, I definitely relate to others. It was interesting to think about the other teachers on my team and try and identify what types they were. I don't consider myself super creative, but have moments here and there. I look forward to learning about the launch cycle.

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  93. I guess I am probably a mash-up of Artist and Engineer, although these two types seem kind of opposite each other?! On one hand, I love new ideas and am always trying to shake things up to keep my students interest level as high as possible. I enjoy developing new lessons and projects for the same old curriculum. But on the other hand, I also like to fix problems with current lessons/projects and see what can be added /subtracted to give them a makeover (The Engineer).
    As I read this chapter I was struck by how many of my colleagues match the creative types described. I am so thankful that we all bring our creative strengths to the table and that we work so well together to come up with great ideas/projects for our students.

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    1. I was doing the same thing. As I read, I tried to think of who would fit in each category. I think my own team consists of a good mix of several different creative types! Like you said, I think it's so important that we ARE different and that we can use these collectively to help our students!

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  94. I guess I would be considered a "geeky artist". I instantly related to the artist, as I love the music and art side of things. I love the creating and decorating and designing aspect of the artist creativity. HOWEVER, I also love collecting and analyzing data! Teachers complain about our data meetings (we have them bi-weekly) where we have tested and analyzed how identified students (for us, it's the bottom 25% kids) have done since the last meeting. We discuss what has been done and what worked and didn't work. We bounce ideas off of each other (good thing we are all creative in our own ways!). I actually look forward to them. I look forward to seeing who has improved and why or if someone hasn't improved, why is that?

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    1. Kerry, I too, feel like I am an artist! But I admire that you are a "geeky" artist and your appreciation for data. We have data meetings too, although not as frequent. I wish I had the passion for them as you do! They intimidate me, and data to me is an unfamiliar, scary frontier- I usually associate data with math, a subject area which frightened me as a student (bad, I know, I shouldn't have this mentality). However, I am very interested in your bit about how at your meetings you look at what has been done and what improvements have happened, and bounce ideas off of one another. I really think this is a great idea by opening the conversation about the data and making it less intimidating to people like me. This is an idea I might have to borrow and share with my school! Thanks for the information!

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  95. I completely agree with the author and that everyone is creative in their own way. I think that at times when we think of creativity, as they said in the chapter, tend to only think of the traditional sorry but bring creative is individualized just as our students are. I know that I see it in my staff. One para is very creative in the traditional sense but then I'd also creative in organization. Another para is creative in how she will get my data easily accessible to me and my staff whole another is able to look at a situation with a student and see a new angle we haven't got of or tried. Another is able to think of all of the input and then product a wonderful idea. I couldn't imagine my room without any one of them. I truly think that when I give them the chance to use these abilities my classroom is far greater than before.

    Using did this I find it ironic that my creative falls most inline with the point guard mentality. I truly am always thinking more about what the experience will make the students remember in ten years and I even find myself focusing on what adults, staff, and others experience and take away from my room.

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  96. Yes I agree with the author that we are all creative. I would consider myself to be an author and a photographer. However I would also consider myself to be an interior designer. I grew up with a super creative dad. You should have seen the treehouse he designed for my siblings and me. It looked like something out of Swiss Family Robinson. In the beginning of my teaching career I enjoyed providing hands on activities and experiments.

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  97. I believe that all are creative in some form or another. Everyone has a skill that they can do better than others. As educators I think that our profession allows us to use creativity to present material in a variety of ways. I would consider myself as more of the "Point Guard." I teaching in the primary grades so I am constantly changing or modifying something to better fit my students. I was once told by one of my college professors to always have a Plan A,B and Plan C in your back pocket. For me my creativity in the classroom comes with flexibility. I must always keep a creative mindset so that I can allow for my students to be creative themselves.

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  98. This week’s reading really intrigued me and resonated with me, as I do agree with the authors that we are all creative.. As I read the chapter, I found myself thinking of colleagues who fit the different creative “types” outlined in the book, and recognized that there have been many moments in my interactions with these people when I’ve thought to myself, “wow, that is creative!”, even when it may not fit the standard “creative” artsy type that comes to mind when you first think of someone deemed creative. I teach social studies in a middle school setting with a team of other teachers in different subject areas. We all work really well together and after reading this article I think this is largely in part that we all have different creative types. I personally feel that I am more of the Artist type. Partly, I feel as though since I am a newcomer to the profession I do not have the comfort or skills set to feel as though I can “hack” the rules or “geek” over the content and data, because I am still collecting this information in my first year. However, I feel that I am the artist type because I am never satisfied with a lesson unless it is something that I have designed from scratch on my own. I’ve seen sample lessons on topics I teach, and sometimes I use them to spark my own thinking, but I never use someone else’s lesson because I truly enjoy thinking of the new opportunities and potentially better ideas I can concoct if I added my own flair to it. My desire to better and also create something new and my own is much in line with the author’s statement that “….to the Artist, a better question might be, why not reinvent the wheel? The world would be pretty boring if every wheel looked the same!” Each unit I try new activities, new note-taking strategies, new discussion strategies and make notes to myself on how they go and if the students like them. Before I teach a lesson, every time I go over it tirelessly to double check if I think the activities will be fun, engaging, and ones the students will love. I ask students while I am designing future lessons if they like this idea or that idea-I even test out activities on “sample” students (family members) to see what they think, much like the authors’ description of the artist as being one who cares about designing activities students will love. I love designing simulations to help my students really “experience” history and life in the past, and these simulations come from my own mind, research, and hours of work. For instance, to teach my students about the social classes in ancient civilizations, rather than have students read a textbook section or watch a short video, I designed a simulation in which students experienced 8 different social classes in ancient times. Each social class had a station with a brief reading, images, and activity the students had to complete so they “took on” the roles in that social class. For instance-kings were able to demand taxes, and students who were in the “artisan” social class in my simulation made artwork out of clay or drawings. Furthermore, I also feel as though my “artist” tendencies are manifested in my teaching through my frequent use of choice board projects. In these projects, I rack my brain to come up with a variety of options students can pick from to show their understanding and also provide students with the opportunity to share their own idea with me. My lesson planning takes hours because I come up with my lessons from scratch-and they are messy in that usually they are jotted down on scratch papers at first-but I love having the freedom to develop lessons on my own, much like the “artist” type from the text.

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  99. When I first read this question I was thinking of creativity as in the art sense. I was happy to read that the author said that is what most people think of it as. I was more happy to learn that I am a creative person! I am more of "The Geek". I believe now that all people are creative. While reading I was picturing my students and categorizing them in my head as to what creativity they possess. I was at an education conference many years ago and the speaker was a teacher from another country. The heart of his speech was that he WANTED his own children to go to school in America. He said that in his home country educators and administrators stifle creativity. I didn't fully understand what he meant until I read this chapter. He told us that in his country students are trained to be engineers and doctors and if students don't cut it then they are doomed. I have realized that I need to allow my students more zigzags to encourage their creativity type. I originally thought that being creative meant having creative lesson plans. I now realize it is about encouraging creative thinking and problem-solving. My own daughters were very involved in Future Problem Solvers of America. Hearing their thought processes and activities from the club was so intriguing. The type of the geek comes out in my classroom in many ways. I am often planning lessons where students have to find out why something works. I definitely focus on bringing order to chaos. However, I will now be thinking of ways to encourage learning through the other 5 types of creativity to enhance learning for all of my creative thinkers!

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