Friday, September 2, 2016

Digital Citizenship Week 7: Putting It All Together

It's the last week of the book club discussion so it's time to put it all together. Borrowing Susan's question at the end of chapter 7, what specific steps will you take as a result of reading this book to facilitate the implementation of a community-based digital citizenship program in your school or district? These may be big or small steps and they may just be in your classroom. 

Please have all comments posted by 5pm eastern on Monday, September 12th. Make sure you use this time to comment to posts or comments from each week. Also, if you didn't register or if you aren't sure whether or not you registered, please complete the registration form here. If you don't register I won't have your email address and I won't be able to send your PGPs.

Just a bit over a week to go until Indiana Digital Citizenship week. IDOE encourages all schools to take part in the state digital citizenship week which provides a set of comprehensive lesson plans on big topics such as digital identity, cyberbullying and copyright issues. Also, if you have not joined the Digital Citizenship Community of Practice, that is a great place to continue this important conversation.

112 comments:


  1. I have opportunities to encourage Digital Citizenship while teaching every day. Those come along with giving students some guidance and life messages while teaching math, Spanish, etc. From this book and blog I have become more focused on seizing those moments: times when I will expect students to cite sources or other occasions when a class 'discussion' can be handled on an LMS to give them experience reacting to each other online rather than face to face.

    While a formal Digital Citizenship program is exemplary, some behavior lessons are learned with practice. All of the schools in my district have a citizenship program called PBIS; we have not formally added Digital Citizenship to that system, however, digital conduct codes could be included. We already have established in our building three aspects of that program: Respect, Responsibility, and Personal Best. One reason I like the program is because all acceptable behavior falls into one of those realms, and as a result I don’t have a lot of itemized class rules at the middle-school/high school level. We have a matrix that covers every area of the building and how the behavior system looks in that location of the school: tech is almost everywhere…and where it should not be (the restroom), there would be a part of the PBIS plan regarding responsible use of technology that speaks to that. Good citizenship encompasses the responsibility, respect, and personal best that applies to both digital and non-digital aspects of all of our lives. We need to update our positive behavior plan to become PBIS 2.0, and we will have generated a Digital Citizenship program that reveals our commitment to this aspect of our students’ education.

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    1. I think the kids today understand more than we realize. Maybe they don't get the big concepts, but they do understand manners and how to treat people. If we draw the correlation that that applies on-line as well it at least plants the seed.

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    2. I am currently learning about PBIS through a professional development course. Initially, I thought that PBIS was simply teaching individual behavior management strategies, but I have since realized that this is a school-wide strategy. Including digital citizenship in this approach seems very logical, especially when you realize how much bullying is occurring online these days.

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    3. Kathleen, I hope you have a group from your school to help you put PBIS in place. I was on the committee seven or eight years ago to lay some of the groundwork for this. It is a lot of work ongoing and, like the digital citizenship effort, well worth the time put into building a foundation. Sometimes it felt like we were reinventing the wheel, and couldn't we just adopt a proven plan that was working elsewhere? However, like a lot of other initiatives, the more that it was tailored to our site, the more people would see it as a plan designed for our needs. As it should be, my term on the committee has finished, and others continue to work very hard to keep it going because they believe in the outcomes. This book/blog has shown me once again, that the PBIS plan should be static to fit the needs of the people and times that change.

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    4. Kathleen, developing a school-wide PBIS is a worthwhile venture. Teaching digital citizenship within PBIS is a great strategy. Good luck!

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    5. Tammy, Amy, Kathleen, and Connie,
      I agree the PBIS Committee is a very logical group to initiate some Digital Citizenship topics. If the members of our PBIS Committee consider it, I think they would receive some fantastic positive feedback from teachers, principals, superintendents, and parents.

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  2. I can mostly just teach about digital citizenship to the parents and discuss with other teachers! Students are too young to understand it.

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    1. I think students are more educated about the digital world than many adults. As soon as students are old enough to be part of the digital world, they are old enough to be taught good digital citizenship. Young digital citizens need to be taught about being safe in the digital world and about cyber bullying.

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    2. I agree that my kindergarten and 1st grade students are a little too young for all the concepts of citizenship. These students are still really still working on character building skills. My older students are the ones that I am really trying to make the connection with digital citizenship and social skills.

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    3. If the young ones are on some sort of device then they are not too young to be taught about how to be safe on that device. Yes, it looks different for the younger kiddos; not giving out personal information, if I get somewhere and it not appropriate what do I do etc. I just don't think there is a too young in this kind of education.

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    4. I teach preschool. And I agree that at some level you can begin building a foundation of digital citizenship...even with 3 year olds. We use ipads in our room...as a group but we are able to discuss how we treat others. We are building character as Linda has mentioned. I also encourage parents to look at my blog with their kiddos and talk about what they see to actively connect the parents and the students. I think it is important to keep open lines of communication between all of us.

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    5. What a healthy discourse. I lean toward the thinking that if children can use a device then it's time to be talking about the elements of healthy, responsible digital citizenship. It's not necessary to talk about good vs. bad as young children will associate those distinctions with behaviors later. It's all about teaching habits at the early stage. For K-2 do check out the age appropriate resources from Common Sense Education. There are loads of materials that may inspire your own plans. It is a bit trickier for preschoolers, but the conversation starters are there. There is also the Piano and Laylee book series including Piano and Laylee Go Online, which give specific examples of character issues as they relate to being digcits.

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    6. I teach kindergarten and would say they are not too young to start with the basics of digital citizenship. These students already know how to get around on a device and do things they haven't been shown just by their own exploration. Is it going to look different in kindergarten than 3rd? Absolutely! I think discussing the importance of good digital citizenship is laying the foundation for them as they grow and understand more about it. In the younger grades it's a lot more discussion and modeling about digital citizenship. If they are going to use technology, they need to understand how to be good citizens while using it as well. Are my discussion with my kindergartners in depth? No, we stick to the basics. But, I want to lay that foundation for the next teacher to build on so there is some understanding on the students part.

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  3. Teaching in a 1:1 school, digital citizenship needs to be integrated into my content curriculum. As my classes started the year discussing the elements of #digcit, that conversation and focus needs to be continual. The conversation needs to be so continual that students see a connection between being a good citizen, digital citizen, classmate, sportsman, collaborative group member, and member of our school family. Getting the connection between class rules, school rules, school vision, sportsmanship in teams, and digital citizenship standards will develop the desired culture of a successful experience.

    As a teacher connected to the families of my students, I need to be thoughtful on how I model it and be the "brand ambassador" of our school. I need to be connected and continually learn about #digcit tips to model and share by being part of a PLN on Twitter or learning community through the IDOE. My top goal is to model fair use and copyright in a way that it not only becomes part of what students model, but will do without having a look of disgust when told they have to cite their sources; as though it is hardest thing and most time consuming thing to do.

    Making this a part of the school culture will be more successful if shared by the entire school. The connection I talk about can happen if there is a systematic approach. All eachers need to speak with the same vocabulary and have the same expectations. I will attempt to request that #digcit tips be part of our continual conversation through our weekly newsletter or weekly professional development, or #digcit board someone mentioned in a previous post.

    I will include parents to help have a conversations with students during times of teachable moments for growth. Share with parents, rather than dealing it by myself, a nasty email sent to me when requesting information, an assignment that had no citations, or better yet, completely plagiarized, or a negative comment made through the chat capabilities on cites we use such as Google classroom.

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    1. I think that keeping the vocabulary consistent is important so that students will have a firm foundation to build their knowledge and become better Digital Citizens.

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    2. I agree that the overall vocabulary helps our kids to understand social media. Great point!

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    3. I love that you all have picked up on the necessity for building a common language as part of building a culture of digital citizenship education. Have you noticed how the Common Sense lesson plans include key vocabulary in each module-many of which are good vocab words in general.
      https://www.commonsensemedia.org/educators/scope-and-sequence

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    4. I agree with all of the points listed above. I also teach in a 1:1 school, so coming up with good ideas on how to teach our concept is paramount. With the election coming up, I try to take a look at articles/posts together and have class discussions regarding the content of the article/post and whether or not it displays strong digital citizenship. You would be amazed how much growth students have shown in the few weeks we have been doing this.

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  4. I joined edweb.net, and I am hoping to get myself more educated on the topic of digital citizenship.
    I like the idea of sending home pieces of information about digital citizenship through parent communication. With this in mind, I'm going to first send home a survey to parents asking them which form of communication (email, newsletter, school website, Twitter, Facebook, Remind) do they feel best fits with their busy schedules. I want to make sure that they are going to actually read the communication I'm sending home.
    I think the beginning of the school year has teachers busy enough without adding to their plate, so I think that it would be beneficial, and perhaps better received, to start gathering ideas and insights from other teachers in a few months about getting parents involved with digital citizenship. Maybe start small with a before or after school parent gathering. I think it needs be well-planned and thought out to make sure that parents will continue to want to participate.
    Mostly, I will focus on talking about digital citizenship with my students and having a round-table discussion with them. They will be the experts in this discussion. I'm surprised by the different apps that they use that I didn't even know existed. Trying to get them to take positive digital citizenship and apply it to their everyday computer/digital usage will be the goal.

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    3. [I delete one and end up deleting both...] I've joined edweb and have learned from several of their webinars. We have 1:1 and a technology coordinator and staff to inform us on updates. Our building technology staff present lessons to the students bi-weekly. Last week the students were reminded of safety rules and personal information on the web. My class is always eager to continue once we have returned to our classroom. I learn new things along with them and I sometimes can allow for further discussion.

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  5. An open house is planned for parents in October. I plan to talk to them about good digital citizenship. I will continue to ask for support from the administrators pushing for training for all teachers. In addition, I have e-mailed the union president asking if they could be involved in supporting the training. Finally, I will model good digital citizenship in the classroom.

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    1. Josie, I love that you are asking administrators, grade level teachers, and including students in this undertaking! At times, I think that, many students have much to share and contribute! Good for you!

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    2. Josie, if the Office of eLearning can be of any assistance, let me know. Superintendent Ritz is behind Indiana DigCit Week and a year long effort to get schools certified through Common Sense Education.
      http://www.doe.in.gov/elearning/digital-citizenship/digital-citizenship

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  6. Within our school, if I was the person who was the most knowledgeable about this, I would ask our principal to be the project lead, and ask one teacher for each grade level to step up as well. Asking older students who have a strong understanding would be beneficial as well. All of these individuals would be able to give insight as to what is age/grade appropriate, and students could give their own perspective as well. I plan to allow our principal to borrow this book, and send an email to the IT director to inform them about the resources that are available to educate all of our students on digital citizenship. Finding the entire staff to jump on board in their free time could cause some road blocks, but thinking that this would not only educate students, but teachers and parents as well, could be an incentive.

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  7. In order for any school to have success with learning and displaying digital citizenship, all stakeholders need to model and understand what it is. That just won't happen without teacher AND student buy in. I think I can start by making sure I'm modeling what digital citizenship looks like in my classroom, and teaching students why it is so important. From there, I can talk to my colleagues and hope that they will get on board as well.

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    1. I agree with you that all stakeholders need to model and understand what good digital citizenship is and looks like. Parents are also a stakeholder in teaching good digital citizenship. Do you have a plan to educate parents?

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    2. I don't-- yet, but definitely need one. Right now, we are struggling just to get parents INVOLVED in the school at all.

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  8. My plan is to teach my students about digital citizenship and about their responsibility as digital citizens. I will be sending home digital citizenship information to parents to help educate them. Also I plan on sharing what I have learned with my fellow first grade teachers and with my building principals. I have talked to the IT person in the building I work at and she said she will forward the link Michelle Green shared during Week 5 http://www.doe.in.gov/sites/default/files/digital-citizenship/k-2_1.pdf with all the teachers in the building. Putting a little reminder about being good digital citizens in my classroom newsletter is another way I will be able to do my part to help educate my students’ parents.

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    1. Thanks for connecting your colleagues, Sharon!

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  9. I totally agree with Susan Bearden’s comments in the conclusion where she states, “We all hope that our students will grow up to be responsible citizens of the world who contribute to society in constructive way.” In my particular teaching position I try to keep this in mind every day and share this with my students throughout the school year. I share this through my classroom behavior plan and during spontaneous teachable moments that we all encounter during the school day.
    Specific steps on how to facilitate digital citizenship in my classroom may be a little more difficult to implement but I have made a start by trying to connect social skills and digital citizenship. I did contact the IT department and they came out to my classroom when I had older students in the room and we all went on the internet together. I am going to try and have internet time on Fridays after tests. This is a small start but it is a start. I also don’t have access to enough computers that will connect to the internet so that causes another problem.
    I am hopeful that starting with myself through activities like being involved in the elearning class on digital citizenship and then sharing with my peers, parents, and students we can accomplish our goal of helping our students to ultimately become responsible adult citizens.

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  10. While my school is hoping to go 1:1 with iPads this week, we have been in school three weeks now, this has been a very time consuming undertaking to get the iPads ready for students to use. I plan to send home a link to Common Sense Media site. This site has a wealth of information and resources for parents to explore. Once we are up and running, I am planning to incorporate digital citizenship into my Friday plans. My students usually are assessed on Fridays, and I think that incorporating Internet time will lighten Fridays for my students. My hope is that this will open the discussion about what we post on the Internet and what we find/see on the Internet is always out there. Yes, some items can be taken down from the Internet, but others have already seen/read what was out there and can share this information with others. My hope is by having this discussion at school that my students will take some of this information home and share it with the adults at home.

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    1. Sounds like you have a great plan! Love the idea of having digital citizenship lessons on Fridays. It keeps the process ongoing for your students. Also gives them hands on application of what you are discussing. Not sure if your school uses a LMS like Google Classroom but, it might be a good to put some of your lessons on that.

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  11. I plan on first attempting to get back into Twitter regarding my personal learning network and professional development. This will allow me to not only learn more about implementing digital citizenship but also provide me an opportunity to model good digital citizenship to my students as well as my colleagues and parents.

    I definitely plan to try and add digital citizenship content to our Show-and-Tell professional development meetings. I think it’s a good refresher for our staff and something we need to continually be mindful of with our implementation of iPad technology in the classroom.

    In addition, I would like to provide my students with an opportunity to self-publish their work that also includes their parents and/or guardians as well as set up a weekly communication board with parents via Canvas. I think there are a lot of opportunities to better utilize our educational portal and I would like to start experimenting with what we already have available to use before I branch out and try other websites and resources; I’d like to master what’s already in use before I attempt anything else.

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    1. Cassie, what a smart approach to expand what you already have in place! I hope you join the Indiana Digital Citizenship Community and post when you share at your Show and Tell with your colleagues!
      http://bit.ly/DigCitCommunity

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    2. After reading this book and learning from all the helpful posts in this book club, I agree that I need to first get back into Twitter in order to effectively model and teach good digital citizenship. (Glad I'm not the only one not 100% on board!) I feel more informed and therefore more comfortable to be a good digital citizen. I would also like to share the information in this book, many ideas from this book club, and the common sense website with the staff and teachers at our school. I think it would be helpful to form a team to lead the community based approach to digital citizenship, starting in the classroom and also flowing into the students homes. I think this is so important and to start it young will only benefit every student!

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  12. My goal will be to continue to model for my students while we use different internet websites and technology. They teach me as we work. Our related arts/specials time in computers is being spent teaching the common sense curriculum.
    I agree that right now it would be just something else on our plates but also
    agree that we need to be made aware of what we are teaching in that time so we can use same vocabulary and materials if applicable.
    I plan to continue to be open to new learning and sites/apps we can use with students and provide a safe place where they can use those to learn and grow. When subject arise, we discuss (2nd) and learn together.

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    1. Jenni, so many positives in your post! I love "They teach me as we work." What a great attitude! I also love that while you have a colleague covering the direct instruction using the Common Sense curriculum, you plan to amplify those lessons in your own instruction/relationship with the kids. In the end, I believe that community effort will SAVE you time and repay you in other ways.

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  13. My plan is to work within my department to coordinate how we address the topic of digital citizenship. I would like for there to be consistent expectations across grades on this subject. I would like to develop a curriculum list of topics that should be taught to students related to digital citizenship, and to make sure that at each grade level we know which of those topics are being covered.

    On the personal side, I want to find the best medium for communicating with students outside of school. Thus far, I have had a strict rule of not interacting with students at all through social media. Classroom-related messages are sent strictly through email. However, I know that most students do not regularly check their email. I would like to explore a more convenient method of communicating with students online (such as push notifications on phones), so that I may be a model to them of proper digital etiquette.

    Finally, thank you to everyone for the weeks of discussion. Good luck with the year!

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    1. I definitely second your idea of finding the best medium for communicating with students (and parents) outside of school. Email is iffy, since students don't check it regularly. I do try to stress to students that email is a primary means of communication between teacher and student and that they should get in the habit of checking it each day. However, that doesn't mean that all students actually do it. I must say, sometimes even I don't check my email after I'm home for the day! I need to do a better job of modelling good digital citizenship. Thanks to this book club, I will be more aware of making good decisions in this area.

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    2. Hi, not knowing your grade level off hand it's hard to make recommendations. Should you work with MS & HS students, I can tell you from both sides (teacher and parent) that Remind works well with kids. (My daughter's AP teachers are the best at this. And she's been using it since 6th grade.) I thought of Remind when Matthew mentioned push notifications. Kids can use either the app for messages or receive them by text. Another real world tool if you're open to the cross-communication is Slack. I like Remind in that it is more moderator friendly.

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  14. Having read this book, I feel ready now to map out a digital citizenship plan. And since I see all of the students but kindergarten in my two buildings, perhaps I might be valuable member of a digital citizenship team. I also have a good amount of interaction with parents so engaging and involving them in the team is important too.

    The next step would be the training. I feel using the Common Sense media materials would be a good resource to use. Since my corporation is looking for professional development ideas, making use of that time for digital citizenship would most likely be embraced. Digital Citizenship Week in October might be a great time for a professional development opportunity.

    Staying abreast of current topics would be important. Participating in Twitter chats and learning communities would help in the ongoing development of digital citizenship in my school. As the book mentions, it takes a village. So, getting others on board and willing to discuss and engage in the topic would be important and helpful to the entire school community.

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    1. I like your line of thinking! You definitely would be a valuable member of a digital citizenship team. If your school doesn't have one, getting one formed could be a great way to celebrate Indiana Digital Citizenship Week on the 12-16th of this month.

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  15. Our open house is this week. I plan on informing the parents about Commonsense.org. I think it is a great place to start. We only address bullying and cyberbullying at a mandatory assembly. We are considering 1:1 so I think that administrators need to educate the teachers on dig. cit. and encourage teachers to incorporate lessons. I plan to participate in Dig. Cit week with all three grades. One activity to get going will be the baggie with items in it that can start the discussion and follow up with lessons from Commonsense.org. I liked the book and look forward to the companion website for further information.

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    1. Common Sense has great one sheet flyers you could pass out at your open house too!

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  16. Our high school got Chromebooks this year. I'm not sure how that is going since I'm in another building working for the alternative school, which is mostly juniors and seniors. I have enjoyed this book so I would like to share it with the media/technology person at the high school. She has gone through training as they got ready to do 1:1 this year. We also have a few teachers who have been trained, too. As far as what I can do, I'm an instructional aide so technically this isn't my classroom at the alternative school, but I think I can help students learn the good and bad things about social media. I've caught them on their phones when they should be working on GradPoint so it's always a way to talk to them. I would like to keep learning more and more about this in case I should ever get a teaching job again. This has given me the basics so I need to keep learning.

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  17. The first thing I want to do is learn more about copyright laws and how to cite what I use in my slide shows in class. I think I know who to ask at my school, so I just have to find the time. The next thing I want to do is check through my past work and put in the proper citation. Shameful, I know, that I am not sure how to do this properly anymore, so baby steps! I need to educate myself, so I will keep my eye out for articles online and books, as well as talking to colleagues. As soon as I know what I’m doing, I want to point out what I have learned to my students, demonstrating “lifelong learning” which I try to mention often and model. My focus has been demonstrating lifelong learning within my subject matter, but here is my opportunity to expand.

    I also have an idea in the works about online posts. I want my students to have that discussion about what is appropriate and what is not. It’s someplace to start, and I feel like I am starting from zero. I have never thought specifically about digital citizenship before, though I have always been careful about what I am putting online. Joining in this book study has opened my eyes to the topic of dig cit.

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    1. I am in the same boat as you Lauren. I use powerpoints regularly in my classroom and would like more information on copyright laws. When I know what to do and not to do, I am a better role model for my students. If there is an upcoming assignment that I assign which requires pictures I will know what to instruct upon.

      I am curious what you are thinking about online posts for your classes. My school has Canvas for things like this but I have never used it yet.

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    2. Two Pinterest boards came to mind, Lauren and Kathryn. The first is a collection of real world situations where someone's use of social media led to consequences. These case studies are great for opening up a discussion on Canvas or similar.
      https://www.pinterest.com/INelearn/social-media-case-studies/

      The other board relates to copyright and fair use:
      https://www.pinterest.com/INelearn/copyright-questions-we-all-have/

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    3. Pinterest may be a great place to look for ideas for the little ones. This will be part of my 15 minutes a day of learning about Digital Citizenship.

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    4. Thanks, Lauren, for the honest post! I am an English teacher, so copyright issues are something I try very hard to stay up on, but I still have questions, too. If I do, I know other teachers in my building probably have questions as well. I appreciate the links to the Pinterest sites, Michelle! I plan to read them and use as a resource.

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    5. Thanks, Lauren, for the honest post! I am an English teacher, so copyright issues are something I try very hard to stay up on, but I still have questions, too. If I do, I know other teachers in my building probably have questions as well. I appreciate the links to the Pinterest sites, Michelle! I plan to read them and use as a resource.

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    6. I cringe at many of the copyright violations I observe, and wonder what the best ways are to tactfully tell staff that they should not be copying entire books, showing movies as rewards, or now scan books to share widely. I don't want to be the "copyright police", but want to help educate others.

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  18. I have already been implementing some of the ideas from the book in the classroom, but this chapter reminded me that I need a plan rather than simply relying on "teachable moments."

    1) I need to talk with my principal and librarian about their plans for implementing digital citizenship this year in our school.

    2) I need to write out a plan for my classroom: What do I want students to know and be able to do? I think I'll start with the Digital Citizenship resources next week and then use the Common Sense Media resources, as I move forward with instruction.

    3) I will share resources with families through our Facebook page and by having the students teach their families as part of homework.

    4) I will continue my own personal development, especially by becoming more active on Twitter. I've already followed the people suggested in this book, and I'm going to try out the #digcit chat this week.

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    1. I'm so glad that you got something from the book selection! Next week's #INeLearn Twitter Chat will also have a #digcit spin, so please consider joining us.
      http://inelearnchat.blogspot.com/p/calendar.html

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  19. First, I would like to explore what conversations are taking place at the school and what role I could have on a project team. Weekly teacher meetings provide an opportunity to educate the DigCit vision to teachers. Computer Lab classes provide an opportunity to teach DigCit to the K-5 students. The topic of DigCit parent education could become an agenda item for monthly PTO meetings. In addition, continuing my personal growth on the topic is essential to validating my role in the process of developing and implementing a DigCit plan.

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  20. As I have mentioned several times (each week) working with preschools the digital citizen approach is a bit different. I think here is where we begin building a strong foundation of what it looks like to have good character and how to be safe using the internet. I also believe that it is important to connect parents to what we are doing each week. Over the last 7 weeks...I have thought about how I can be more digitally sound in my room and to try new things. I want to start an on-line newsletter. I currently do a blog...that helps parents feel like they are that "fly on the wall" in seeing what the kiddos are doing. Here I have also posted more links to where I am getting my ideas and the videos we may be watching in the class. I also think it would be neat to upload a read aloud to a book that I have read during the week so parents can listen to it with their child. Here I think an important goal is showing that parents, teachers, and students work together to create a safe environment using digital citizenship. I have also discussed with other teachers about connecting our 2 classes...whether it is a facetime skit or a discussion page.

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    1. I think all of the steps you are taking to incorporate digital citizenship with your 3 year old class are wonderful. I really love the idea about connecting your class with another via FaceTime.

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  21. I’ve already started to put technology tips for parents in our monthly newsletter, sharing tips for parents and students via Twitter, and have taken initial steps to getting a technology help page added to the library website for me to add links, files, etc. to. I did a few explicit lessons on digital citizenship last year. I hope to incorporate more this year and to seek out more opportunities to bring the topics up naturally into conversations and to take more opportunities to model digital citizenship as well. The section that discussed the importance of teaching students how to positive impact their social media and leverage it or brand themselves to their advantage stood out to me. We do often focus on the negative or scary in digital citizenship, but there’s a lot of positive and potential out there too. I think it’s important that we remember that and that we show students that as well. I want to tie more of that into our chats on digital citizenship. I need to think more about a digital citizenship vision for our school and building a team to help implement a stronger program. I’d like to see us be certified by Common Sense Media next school year. My goal is to start taking steps this spring to help us hit the ground running at the beginning of next school year.

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    1. Whoo-hoo for looking toward certification! Let me know if I can help in any way. Did you know you can work on the steps all year long. It's a rolling application through the end of the school year.

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  22. My first step is to talk to our technology coordinator about the current status of our digital citizenship curriculum. Perhaps she just needs a gentle reminder that some students, especially the freshmen, would benefit from taking the digital citizenship course that was developed several years ago. Although she would be the best suited to develop the plan, I could certainly offer to help execute it or be a liaison to the teachers.
    In general, participating in this book discussion has taught me that I need to continue to further educate myself and expand my use of Twitter and other social media. Clearly there is not lack or resources, and perhaps I can use this time I have been using to post my comments to check out some of those resources. I plan on checking out Common Sense Media as soon as I post this comment!

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    1. Thanks for the chuckle...Clearly there is no lack of resources. So true! But in turn, the sheer number can be overwhelming. Common Sense is a great place to start!

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  23. My first steps would be to talk with our math teacher who I found out is pretty involved with digital citizenship already. I would also need to talk with the principal and administration. I would then talk with our English teachers about doing a presentation on digital citizenship. I figured they are my best source to reaching all students. Once all of the logistics are arranged for high school, I would visit the Common Sense Media website for resources as well as all of the helpful links listed here. This has been a great resource and has really made me think of ways to incorporate digital citizenship into our school. I even found a great digital citizenship poster from Demco!

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    1. You sound like you're on your way to being a school lead for certification!
      https://www.commonsensemedia.org/educators/certification-school

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  24. I am very excited to be putting everything together for my school. We are currently creating a plan for our 1:1 implementation next year, and I am tasked with putting it all together for our students. I'm excited to use my knowledge as a Common Sense Educator, as well as community resources to create an interactive, meaningful plan for our students. A great resource we recently brought in to speak to our students is Stephanie Nancarrow from the Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force - she did a great job presenting real information to our students.

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  25. My first step is going to be to start small. If I start small, I can tweak it or add more based on how the lesson goes or what I am trying to achieve with the students. My second step would be to engage parents. If the parents are on board, then digital citizenship will come naturally as it will be implemented at home and at school. My third step would be to keep up with digital citizenship education. Everyday this is changing. I need to know what is changing in order to better serve our students.

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    1. Totally agree that things change so quickly. I like the idea from the book about spending 15 minutes a day on digital citizenship and learning about it. I am really going to try to do that.

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  26. I too feel its best to start small in my own classroom. I just feel that though we call this the computer age I am not really sure if thats completely true sometimes. I have found lately that students dont understand small computer things I fell digital citizenship is one most have no clue about. I feel some will be hard to reach they see the digital world as a waste dump where no feelings are hurt. They of course are very wrong I will focus on the steps to becoming a good digital citizen. The next step will be to engage the parents in the discussion. I think this is going to be a tough battle but one very worth the fight.

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  27. I am going to start on a small scale. I have already begun individual discussions about digital citizenship. My students learn best one on one. I am also planning some small group activities to try to stimulate some discussion and brainstorming about appropriate and inappropriate use. Finally, I am going to reach out to parents with children who are struggling with this issue and offer resources/support.

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  28. I am making it my goal to communicate more openly on Edmodo. I haven't used this Learning Management System much and this is an area in which I have room for improvement. There is an area that I can invite parents to view the class and class notifications that I can use once I become more comfortable.

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  29. I would like to start putting digital citizenship tips in my weekly staff newsletter as well as the newsletter we send home to the parents each week. Even if I don't get it in there every week, but a couple times a month, that will be better than what I am doing now.

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    1. I like the idea of putting types in weekly communications. I will do this with my parents!

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  30. , what specific steps will you take as a result of reading this book to facilitate the implementation of a community-based digital citizenship program in your school or district?

    As I visit schools throughout the year and begin to hear their ideas to incorporate technology I've found many opportunities to begin conversations on digital citizenship. This is a great time to be proactive and anticipate challenges and how to deal with them by educating students and parents. I feel another way would be to add it to the monthly outreach news letter and provide resources for our buildings to use and resources they can easily and readily share with their parents.

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  31. I learned a lot from reading this book. One step I would like to take in the future is to join the #digchat on Twitter. I like to read the conversations after they have happened. Sometimes it is hard to keep the conversation threads intact during the twitter chats. I will also talk about the Common Sense Media information to parents and peers. This may be a great way to disseminate information to those around me. Great choice for this book study!

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  32. I reached out to the staff members who are on the tech team to see what foundation had been laid. I shared this book with them and discussed new ideas. Now I need to collect data on what the kids already know and plan mini lessons. Common Sense Education has a poster I would like to use. This topic can easily be integrated with other safety talks for younger students. Back to School Night is a great time to share what the students are learning.

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  33. Great news! The online resources are now posted:
    https://studysites.corwin.com/connectededucators/digital-citizenship-book.htm

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  34. I plan to talk with our building group that runs the tech events to educate the teachers on technology. They would be the most experienced group and most likely to help implement a program. I would very much then like to be involved in the organization of events.

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  35. We are having an "online safety" presentation next week as we continue to add new items to our current digital citizenship curriculum. The presenter is Cathi Bledsoe from the ISP. I look forward to hearing what she has to say and compare it with the information I have learned through the book and online discussions.

    Also, glad to see the online resources are now available!

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  36. We are having an "online safety" presentation next week as we continue to add new items to our current digital citizenship curriculum. The presenter is Cathi Bledsoe from the ISP. I look forward to hearing what she has to say and compare it with the information I have learned through the book and online discussions.

    Also, glad to see the online resources are now available!

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  37. I have created a google classroom where students and their families can access information about digital citizenship. I would like to organize a district wide event to bring awareness of digital citizenship to the community. Our district is planning on creating a committee to look at ways to educate the community about digital citizenship.

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    1. Our fifth grade team has discussed the idea of creating a Google classroom to help get information to parents and students. If you have any suggestions, I'd love to hear them.

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    2. We are just beginning to use Google Classroom. I, too, am interested to hear how this going with your class.

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  38. We had a digital citizenship in our school, but have now moved it down to grade 8. While it was here, I am sure that the students learned something, but I am not sure it went into the depth that this book is speaking about. I would like to see it continue to work on educating our students and parents. We need to see what the students know and then continue to educate them in the areas they are weak in.

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  39. My first step is to continue my own education of the digital world. I feel like there are so many platforms that I don't use or even know about yet. I'm going to explore the resources that have been provided in our Digital Citizenship book. I'm also going to start an ongoing conversation with fellow teachers about our vision of what we would like our program to eventually look like.

    On a personal level, I've began talking with my seven year old son about digital citizenship and how we use technology to learn.

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    1. I think it is great that you are talking to your son about this! I knew to start with my classroom, but I did not even think of the children in my own family- I have a grandson who would benefit from this information.

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  40. More than anything, I am conscious of the need to teach digital citizenship to my students. Our school system is using Common Sense Media for the basis of some digital citizenship lessons. In fact, we teach our first lesson as a school on the 15th. Each teacher will present the information on cyber bullying. As I communicate with parents, I will make mention of our discussions to plant these ideas in their minds as well. Because I am parenting teenagers, I have a natural connection and examples I can use with my students. I don't know all the teens are doing, but I am exposed to quite a bit of it.

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    1. You have a great resource with your own children to know how teens are using technology to communicate. This will help you keep current with trends and know what to talk to your students about.

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  41. I think the first place that I need to start is within my own classes. I'm excited to use the Common Sense resources with my students and see how things go. As the department chair, I also plan to share the Common Sense resources with them and encourage them to also start using them with their own classes. From there, I hope to possibly lead a "show and tell" at our school to share the information with the rest of the staff. We have these "show and tells" each month as part of our professional development, so after using the resources and getting a little more comfortable with integrating digital citizenship with my classes, I can hopefully pass that on to the rest of my peers and possibly get a school wide movement going! I'm excited to get started!

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  42. The best place for me to start is with parents. I think that many parents of elementary students aren't aware of the dangers their kids face. I heard a speaker compare learning to use the internet to learning to drive a car....there is a lot of practice, monitoring and training involved. By joining the recommended groups will help get a plan in place.

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    1. I would love to know the ideas you have with getting parents to attend your presentations. It is so hard to get them into our building. I think I am going to ask my principal to use our phone system to "All Call" our parents and give them a tip to remember. That may reach more parents than actually having a workshop.

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    2. I like your idea of the all call to parents. We also have a hard time getting parents to attend. Short calls with information might be a way to at least get some information out to them.

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  43. My district now teaches lessons on Digital Citizenship about once a month throughout all grades in all schools in the district. Having a homeroom, I review the lessons the few days before we are to teach them, and after the lesson is finished, I try to take the lessons further with my students by having a discussion on the topics or points we just learned. Additionally, when using technology, I plan on setting expectations for my students in what they should or should not due while using it, and this will align with what they are learning in their Digital Citizenship lessons. One point I really want to further and strengthen is copyright, both in my educational work and in my students. The biggest thing is for myself to set the example to students to cite all information and ideas, including pictures that I use in class. With this, they can then use my example and properly cite all of their information, again, including pictures.

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    1. This is something I really need to work on. In all honesty, I have gotten into a bad habit of just copying and pasting from Google. Over the past year, I have really tried to use Creative Commons pictures when choosing them for my presentations. It is still a huge work in progress

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  44. I plan to start incorporating digital citizenship into my classroom lessons through online discussions that we can engage in through our TL Campus network at school. I realized the value of this opportunity this past week when another teacher began using this resource. The students are really demonstrating excellent digital citizenship. My comment this past week on this discussion site included informing students of the book we are reading through this E--Learning experience. Although the term "digital citizenship" may be new to some, the concept of good manners has been around for sometime.

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  45. I, like many other participants in this blog, joined edweb.net. I'm excited to learn more about the digital world from this community. I also like the idea of hosting events during Digital Citizenship Week and Safer Internet Day. I think this would be a great way to get all stakeholders involved, especially parents. I'm also looking forward to accessing some of the resources from the recently released companion website.
    One step I know I will definitely take is to consistently review the posted chromebook rules with my kids. These rules remind users of their digital responsibilities when on the computers. They are also the expectations in our building with common language used for k-5.
    I plan on continuing to model good digital citizenship in the classroom. My 5th grade team has also discussed the idea of creating a google classroom for parents that include digital citizenship information.
    Our media specialist, who is also part of this group, is very pro-active on this topic. Her classroom lessons always begin with dig cit information and reminders. I think the payoff will be wonderful. Before we know it, our kindergarteners will be pros on the topic when they get to me.
    I have enjoyed being a part of this group. I learned a lot from the book, but I learned even more from the posts from everyone involved. Thanks!

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  46. Being the Media Specialist in my building, I feel it is my responsibility to get the ball rolling with students, staff, and parents. I think the biggest thing to remember for our teachers is to use opportunities that arise in the classroom as mini lessons when teaching digital citizenship. I think teachers need to be open to those opportunities and use them to their advantage. For example, the other day my 5th grade students were using the websites Letsrecap.com and Kidblog. We had a discussion about putting personal information out on the internet and what is the proper procedure when filling out forms. This wasn't necessarily the focus of the lesson, but it was a perfect time to talk about part of being a Digital Citizen.

    I am using next week's Digital Citizenship Week to have our principal read a Digital Citizenship idea in her morning announcements. Both teachers and students will have the opportunity to hear the message and then use that idea in their daily lives. Those same messages will be Tweeted out to parents and added to our Facebook Page.

    Finally, I am also planning to incorporate a monthly lesson into my Library lessons. I am planning on using Common Sense Media and well as Learning.com to create my lessons.

    To reiterate, I think the most important lesson is the lesson that happens "on the fly" To me, it is those lessons that will stay with the children the longest.

    I have really enjoyed this elearning opportunity and felt that it was well worth my time. I enjoyed the book and think it has great ideas.

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  47. My students have had great success using Chromebooks these first weeks of school. This has given me daily opportunities to discuss digital citizenship with them.
    As stated previously, I would like to include a discussion led by students at our upcoming family night. Since our district is just rolling out a 1:1 initiative, we have hired digital coaches to assist teachers and students. Any district digital citizenship curriculum will be developed and led by the coaches. I will recommend they use Susan Bearden's book to help them get started.

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  48. I would like to see a parent corner on our newsletters helping parents know what to look for in terms of apps on phones and notebooks. It is very important to get parents to help teachers keep the digital world as safe as the real world. I want to see our school corporation do more to help educate parents as to what is really happening in the digital world of their students.

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  49. I have already employed several of the suggestions I learned through reading this book and participating in the weekly book club responses. From Common Sense Media (https://www.commonsensemedia.org/), I have found and used classroom materials that promote digital citizenship and help shape good practices. I will continue to use the materials that are on this site. I have also shared this website to assist parents who have struggled to monitor their students who are new to 1:1.

    Our school has utilized older students who started with 1:1 last year (from high school) to show the new middle school 1:1 students the ropes. This method has been successful! I plan to participate in digital citizenship week, and I'll continue to access any materials that will help me grow as an educator so that I can support my students as they navigate the digital world.

    Participating in the elearning book club has been beneficial. I'm looking forward to trying this again.

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  50. This book has been very helpful in seeing the benefits of teaching digital citizenship in school. I plan on including parents in the conversation through a weekly newsletter. Also, students need to be a part of the conversation as well. This can be done through weekly lessons, as well as, through daily interactions with the devices they are using. As a teacher, I will be doing my part to demonstrate and model good digital citizenship along with proper monitoring of student use. Another helpful area would be to continue the discussions the students are a part of in their media lessons in the classroom. This will help the students realize that the lessons are not just a one time thing and are viewed as important by the entire school.

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  51. I think the first step is educating fellow teachers at my school as to the importance of teaching our little ones about digital citizenship. I think using one of our teacher days or a staff meeting would be a good start. The aide that teaches our computer classes also needs some training on what to teach the students. The resources in this book will be helpful for her as well as some of the ideas I've found on here. I think putting bits in newsletters to our parents will also be a big step, so when we are ready to go to 1:1 our parents and staff members will already be good models for the students.

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  52. One of my goals is to learn more about some of the different "walled" social media platforms that were presented in this book. I would like to learn about how these are used and feel comfortable using them in the classroom. I am very sensitive to parents' concerns when it comes to social media, screen time, and online safety. I believe that if I were more educated in the positive aspects of digital citizenship, then I would be much more comfortable educating parents and students about these topics.

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  53. There were a lot of ideas presented in the book that would be great for digital citizenship in my school. I would like to start by taking one of the staff meetings and discuss with the staff and administration some of these ideas and see if we can implement a few this year and increase student and parent instruction over the next two to three years. This way no one is overwhelmed and arguing over what or not what to do in the first year. I feel if we take baby steps it would be a better approach for my school. I really do like the idea of using Facebook and to instruct the parents and students. Additional instruction would be done during school hours.

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  54. Any time I consider an area of improvement for my school, I am mindful of some events last school year that have given me some caution. When making suggestions, sometimes coworkers younger than me might think I am coming across in a way that is not my intention, so I have to phrase my words very carefully. As with anything that suggests improvements need to be made, I have learned it is wisest to first make any improvements in this area that I can individually. It puts me on stronger ground when discussing future improvements with others, and it lets them see I am willing to work on the issue myself. That said, I am also mindful that I will frequently be asked to spearhead an issue myself. I have answered that request many times throughout my thirty-year career. Balance is a must for my life right now as there are many demands on my time personally right now. It is okay to say yes to a leadership role if I am passionate about an issue and feel I have the time and energy to do a good job. It is also okay to play a role and not be in charge of the issue, or to say, I am doing what I can individually as a teacher, but I cannot serve on another committee at this time.

    I like the following ideas and can implement them in my own classroom right now.
    *Spend 15 minutes a day reading, learning more, or developing digital citizenship material.
    *Model digital citizenship professionally and personally in all aspects of my life.
    *Teach others as much as I can about fair use and how to cite a variety of sources.
    *Share Susan M. Bearden's Digital Citizenship book with others.
    *Revisit the set of Laptop Etiquette Rules I wrote when my school first went 1:1 and share them
    with students and parents on my Edmodo Learning Management System.
    *Discuss many of the issues in this book with my students in planned and unplanned, spontaneous conversations.
    *Read more on the Common Sense Media site and use some of their materials.
    *Discuss issues of Digital Citizenship with my PBIS Committee after I do more individually.
    *Incude Digital Citizenship issues when I teach Argumentative Writing or when my students do research-based projects, including writing Research Papers.
    * Write some "Digi-Talk" columns that could be used in an English class newsletter, in our "Knight Crier" newsletter, or as handouts for parents during Parent-Teacher Conferences.

    Thank you so much for such a thought-provoking book selection. It was far shorter than many other professional books, but I think I got more out of this pick than some others.

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  55. Specifically, I want to teach some lessons from Common Sense Education within the classroom. I would like to bring this topic to my coworkers so we can begin to implement something school wide. As an ELA teacher, I would like to find news articles to incorporate within my reading curriculum (informational or persuasive pieces that are about digital citizenship). It seems like a big process and may be slow to implement community wide. However, we have a tight knot community, so if we can get parent buy-in, it could be very successful.

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  56. I think our first step is to focus on educating administrators, teachers, and parents on the importance of digcit and all of its complexities. That way, we can start to build a vision and plan to integrate digital citizenship into all that we do.

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  57. I believe the first thing we must do is make sure that we, as educators, understand what good digital citizenship really is. So often, I see teachers posting things that I find bordering on inappropriate. Also, I really find issue with teachers who "friend" their current students on social media. I think it is much more difficult to educate students on the rights and wrongs of social media when there are teachers who do not seem to know this. And I know there are many more teachers who are doing the right things regarding digital citizenship, but I also realize that it only takes a few who are doing the wrong things to affect the masses.

    Our school corporation has adopted a digital citizenship course which our middle school students will participate in. I am hopeful that it will be a meaningful and worthwhile experience for them, but at this point, I'm not sure if it will be.

    With the ever-changing nature of the Internet and social media, it is crucial that we be at the top of our game with this information.

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  58. This book has generated many ideas and I am excited to get started. I have mentioned several things that I plan to do, including “Library Tool Tuesday” and a library newsletter. I will make sure to incorporate DigCit into these. I’m hoping to put together newsletters focusing on specific groups. The one for teachers will include DigCit lesson ideas to share with their students, the one for students will have DigCit information for students and maybe links to videos and web pages that they will find interesting (hmm...maybe I need one with a middle school focus and one for the high school focus - something to think about…) The student newsletter will also have some sort of “quiz” at the bottom of the page to encourage students to read all the way to the bottom of the page. For parents, the newsletter will have specific information relating DigCit and how they can help their students be safe, productive users of technology.

    As the library media specialist, I have very few students in my classroom, but I am able to impact the whole school population in my own way. I look forward to incorporating what I learned in this book as I try to help my students become better digital citizens.

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  59. There were many useful ideas and tips in this book. I feel like I am better prepared to present the issue of Digital Citizenship to the kids. Involving the parents will present a stronger message to the students about the importance of Digital Citizenship. I plan to model good Digital Citizenship and to encourage the students to always think carefully about how they present themselves online. If every teacher was on board with the importance of the issue, I think it would have a greater impact on the students as they learn to navigate their way through the digital age we live in.

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  60. There were many useful ideas and tips in this book. I feel like I am better prepared to present the issue of Digital Citizenship to the kids. Involving the parents will present a stronger message to the students about the importance of Digital Citizenship. I plan to model good Digital Citizenship and to encourage the students to always think carefully about how they present themselves online. If every teacher was on board with the importance of the issue, I think it would have a greater impact on the students as they learn to navigate their way through the digital age we live in.

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  61. I have the opportunity to incorporate digital citizenship into scheduled library visits; I get to see all of the students in our schools. Still, incorporating different aspects is still best as it directly relates to what students are currently studying, rather than generalized quick hits that can be easily forgotten. Some coordination with departments and staff seems the best way to go.

    We have been using Common Sense Media lessons for the past couple of years, and have a basic type of scope and sequence shared through the media specialists, which works best for intermediate and middle. At the elementary and high school levels, it's a little more problematic; we only have one media specialist for nine elementaries, and not all high school students visit the media center in classes (however, our high school MS work regularly in classrooms)

    Having attended the webinar with Nearpod and Common Sense, I will be able to offer that to my students and staff, beginning now!

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