Friday, August 19, 2016

Digital Citizenship Week 5: Educating Students

This week's chapter is all about educating students about digital citizenship. Susan opens this chapter saying, "Incorporating digital citizenship lessons organically into the fabric of daily lessons is probably the most effective approach...." Considering this, and assuming you have educated yourself in the different areas of digital citizenship, what can you do in your classroom to teach your students about digital citizenship. Think not only about the focused lessons you can do, but also how you model things like privacy, copyright, fair use, communication, safety.

IDOE encourages all schools to take part in the state digital citizenship week which provides a set of comprehensive lesson plans on big topics such as digital identity, cyberbullying and copyright issues. Also, if you have not joined the Digital Citizenship Communities of Practice, that is a great place to continue this conversation.

One of our participants suggested that I share the blog posts on Fridays so you have the weekend to read and respond. Last week I posted on Saturday morning and many of you responded over the weekend, so apparently this is a good time for others. So feel free to respond over the weekend or during the week...or both! Whatever works best for you.

Next week we will read and discuss chapter 6, Educating Parents.

110 comments:

  1. This has me thinking of ways to teach digital citizenship to my 1st graders. I know I want to really stress the need to be safe while on the internet. I feel very strongly that 1st graders should not be on the internet without adult supervision. We can teach them about being safe, but I have watched the show, “What Would You Do?”. Some kids will still talk to strangers, let strangers into their homes, and get into strangers cars even after their parents and teachers have taught them not to do any of those things. Some kids will talk to strangers, give out their personal information, and meet complete strangers in person that they have 1st meet over the internet even though they have been taught otherwise.
    Another part of digital citizenship I want to really stress to my students is to be careful what they say on the internet. Things like not saying mean things to or about others and to use appropriate language at all times. One idea to teach cyberbullying that I was thinking about doing was to write a “mean” email to a fictitious person and having it displayed on the whiteboard for the kids to see. This should open up the conversation of how the email will make the person feel when they read it and why no one should send “mean” letters.
    I will touch on the other things like copyright etc. but I feel that internet safety and being respectful while on the internet are more vital and relevant to 1st graders.

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    1. I like the idea of a mean email or comment to spark a conversation. I think I will use this idea.

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    2. As I have mentioned, I am the resource teacher at our school. I go into all of the classrooms K-5, so educating and raising awareness about internet safety would also have to be treated in different ways. While trying to decide how to respond, I read Sharon's comment. I also LOVE the idea of showing the younger children a "mean" letter. That same activity could be used in all the grades, but obviously age appropriate letters for each grade.
      Also, while teaching a lesson, or working even in small groups, we could take a survey or a class interview on what they already know about all the negative issues such as communicating with strangers, surfing the internet without an adult, posting negative comments or photos that will not only hurt themselves, but others as well. Bringing up each of these topics/issues in different areas of subjects throughout the day or week would be ideal.

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    3. I think using the idea of talking with strangers in the internet is a great way to teach 11st graders! And since you already teach about strangers, you are embedding the concept into your curriculum.

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    4. Love the idea about the "mean" email. I also love the THINK charts to share with students both in life and on the internet

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    5. I agree with the importance of them understanding safety and being respectful! I have always started The school year with my students sitting in a circle on the floor. I have a face drawn on a cut out circle- the kids go around and each crumble up the face as if they said an unkind word. At the end, the idea is to then straighten the face out and take out all the wrinkles- which you can't- just as you can't take back unkind words you have said. Wondering if a similar example of using a computer cutout and what you say on the Internet, would be similar to your mean email approach for younger kids.

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  2. You are so on the mark, Sharon! Have you seen Common Sense Education's video Pause & Think? It inspired the plans for the K-2 lessons IN Digital Citizenship Week. I'd appreciate hearing what you think of the suggested activities:
    http://www.doe.in.gov/sites/default/files/digital-citizenship/k-2_1.pdf

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    1. I will be using the resources found on the Common Sense Education's video Pause & Think. I want to get started on teaching digital citizenship to my 1st graders. Thanks for the information!

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  3. I like the way Holy Trinity Academy used the Common Sense Education curriculum in their classrooms. Setting up specific times to teach formal lessons on these issues is important, though sometimes difficult with our standards driven schedules. From my own experience, students love hearing true stories of students whose online behavior unexpectedly got them into trouble. They can often relate to these stories as they realize they may have made a similar mistake with their own online behavior. I always tell students that if they’ve never looked at the privacy settings on their social media accounts, then chances are they’re sharing more than they know. Challenge them to go home and review what they’ve put online.

    I’ve also tried to naturally integrate digital citizenship in my lessons by modeling good behavior. In my PPs/Prezis/Nearpods I use fair use media and include citations with any pictures or info I use. Students do notice this and have asked me about it before. I then require them to do the same on their own projects. Since I have modeled it to them all year, they do a better job of handling fair use material and providing citations for them.

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    1. Matthew, love that you model proper citations to your students and discuss fair use with them. I use Edmodo with my students. Short stories and poems that are available in the public domain I can attach on Edmodo. When I don't attach something for students to refer to or reread, someone invariably comes to class and says, "You forgot to put (title) on Edmodo." This leads to another discussion of public domain and what this means. Your comment about the privacy settings on their social media items is very important. I should start talking about this with my students,

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    2. I agree that modeling what we want the students to do is very important. I plan on going over all my presentations to make sure I have also used citations with Pictures. I also like to bring up examples from what is in the news about people getting into trouble and it always starts a conversation. I plan to take part in Digital Citizenship week as well to teach a lesson at each grade level.

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  4. We use a platform called Schoology in our system as an online classroom space. I would like to use the discussions option to start with my sixth graders. This is a closed forum that I feel I could guide them to what is and is not appropriate to post. I also want to have my students create digital portfolios. I recently found an app called Fresh Grade that I want to incorporate to have them compile items, while teaching digital citizenship. Finally, I want to dive in to Common Sense Education and deliberately teach some of the lessons offered for middle school students. Students struggle with plagiarism and citations, so I would want to incorporate those lessons in as well. Sometimes I feel as if there's not enough time in a day!

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    1. Tricia, so true. There isn't enough time in the day to teach everything! It seems teachers are continually being asked to add things and left to wonder, "But what goes?" Like you, I do feel I need to incorporate more aspects of digital citizenship in my classes. Thank you for the mention of the Fresh Grade app. I want to check it out!

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    2. Time is definitely a factor! I agree with the author that weaving it into our daily lessons is a great way to do it. I also want to start digital portfolios and will look into Fresh Grade. Thank you!

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    3. I think a big selling point goes back to teachers and it is up to us in the blog to go back to our staff and really sell the program. I can see some of the teachers in my school thinking "They are just kindergartners, they don't need digital citizenship" It really is up to the leadership of a building to instill the importance of Digital Citizenship.

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  5. After reading this chapter, I was encouraged because I already do some of the things mentioned at the bottom of page 36.
    -My English students blog, and I have had discussions with them about what constitutes a reply or comment that advances the discussion. Repeating someone else's reply or comment only is not enough. Once they understood I was looking for more effort than that, they started putting more care into their writing.
    -My classes all have Edmodo pages we use for daily assignments. I can attach files or videos, and an Edmodo page is helpful for preparing students for tests. In many ways, it is like creating a daily log of activities and becomes an ongoing study guide for students. I mention this to parents during conferences. It also allows absent students to check what was accomplished in class on the missed day.
    -I have a Twitter account, but I am not good about being a consistent contributor. I find Twitter to be a mix of really helpful educational advice, but also the "drama queen" child of all social media. As my daughter moved through high school, she helped me become aware of how inappropriately teenagers her age were using Twitter.
    The suggestions on the top of page 37 are all great ideas! My English classes focus on citing sources when we are writing an Argumentative paper, but I need to incorporate more copyright/fair use mini-lessons into my teaching. I show students how easily I can find plagiarism using Google, but I need to do this more than I do. Students need repetition to fully grasp a concept and why it is important.
    Students at my school are required to take a "Careers" class (Most think it is not very helpful). Another required class is "Keyboarding." I like the idea of merging keyboarding skills with some digital citizenship lessons, and including some digital literacy lessons in the careers class. Across the board, it would be nice if each department in a school agreed to include some aspect of digital citizenship in their classes. I love when a concept in my class is also mentioned or taught in another class. Students are always excited to let me know when a topic we've covered in Current Events comes up in another class!
    Lastly, I love the mention of students learning how to brand themselves. This would be so helpful, and so important. Our teachers have frequently been told to, "Tell our story." That is fine, but it has become increasingly clear that our corporation also needed to do this in a more organized way. We are losing students to nearby districts by the dozens, not because the other schools are necessarily better, but because they have done a better job of branding themselves. Our governor, and our state, has turned education into more or a competitive business-like entity since students do not have to geographically live in a district to attend a specific school. This has increased the need for school districts to advertise and brand themselves.

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  6. I have been thinking about ways to more deliberately incorporating digital citizenship. As a middle school teacher, we focus so much on the cyberbullying aspect, but we forget to incorporate the other aspects of digital citizenship that are just as important.
    One thing that students definitely struggle with is finding online information and evaluating sources, as well as how to ethically use that information. That's definitely an important skill to address. But I think we need to spend more time talking to our students about their online reputation and explain how it follows them.

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    1. I don't think kids understand giving credit to other people's work they may use as well as we assume they do. I think some kids think if it's on the internet, they are able to use it without citing it. We can't expect students to know something if they aren't educated first.

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    2. I found a great source for helping students understand sourcing and plagiarism was our local public and college libraries. They were more than happy to share the online and print information with me.

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  7. As much as I enjoyed Chapter 5, I found it to be of more help/guidance to those who perhaps teach middle or high school. Was I the only one that felt this way? I have loved the lessons on BrainPopJr in the past, although my school is not renewing its membership this year. Does anyone have any additional resources for 3rd grade? My students have gone from iPads for k-2 to their own laptops. I've just begun to use them and we've had class discussion on digital citizenship; however, I know I am going to want to constantly bring it up throughout the entire school year.

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    1. I was wondering the same thing. I didn't realize BrainPop had lessons. I also see that Nearpod in collaboration with Common Sense Media has a curriculum for sale. Has anyone had any experience with it?

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    2. We will be doing a webinar with NearPod on this topic on Tuesday, September 13 at 4pm. I will share more details here and through social media soon. Be sure you're following @INeLearn and #INeLearn on Twitter.

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    3. The K-12 Teacher Alliance provided this article from Jacqui Murray on ways to teach digital citizenship. I found their specific grade level ideas helpful when teaching second graders and my toddler at home. http://www.teachhub.com/how-teach-digital-citizenship.

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    4. I teach students with moderate cognitive disability. Most are extremely low functioning. I do think I can take some basic advise for the chapter. I will model good digital citizenship for my students.

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    5. Sarah, thanks for sharing the website with different grade level ideas. As a kindergarten teacher it can be difficult discussing digital citizenship and making sure the students understand. I think its just about starting simple and helping them know how to make good choices as they start using technology available to them.

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  8. One aspect of digital citizenship that I model is appropriate tone and format for e-mail. Students' lax texting and informal social media habits lead to the downfall of their word choice and grammar in e-mail. Modeling professional communication, I sometimes ask students to proof-read, edit and resend an improved e-mail to me before I act upon a request that they have. Raising their awareness of this component of digital citizenship can help them acquire and keep future employment in the real world. It is possible that careful consideration before dashing off a few lines to me, their teacher, will also train them in other areas of their lives to take care with their keystrokes. Of course, I take into account a few factors prior to returning their e-mail: death/disaster in a family is no time to squabble about language mechanics; likewise, some students need encouragement to communicate in the first place so I am slow to suggest improvements to those few. My main goal is to help them understand that digital usage has the power to make a good impression or ruin one.

    As I have increased my use of Twitter, instagram, Facebook, etc. I am becoming more aware of how confusing this can be for students to mix their messages. In the beginning I used Twitter mostly for professional purposes, posting and reading helpful educational ideas. As I become more familiar with it, I marvel at how easily I post something from my social life on Twitter which is in some ways just revealing my personality, but now I have blurred the lines with social and professional use of the same site. Thinking twice before I post anything remains a wise check point for my use of social media.

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    1. I so agree with you, Tammy, about modeling appropriate tone and format for email communications. So many times when I receive an email from a student, the email contains emojis and texting abbreviations. The greeting (if there is one) is likely to be "hey." One thing I try to make students aware of is the different standards for emails/texts intended for different audiences. Tailoring a communication for a specific audience is more important now than ever, with the wide variety of media at students' disposal.

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    2. Tammy,

      This would also be a great lesson for teachers. I may put out this information to my staff. Then, it would be an easy discussion to have with their students.

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    3. My students practice email etiquette every Monday. I require them to have a subject, greeting, body, closing and signature. We talk about proper emails all semester long, especially as it is growing as one of the main forms of communication with staff!

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    4. Kara . . . I really like the concept of email etiquette that you are doing on Mondays. That is so timely and it also helps refine writing skills. Tone and word choice are huge areas that need hit, and again, there is cross over to academic writing as well.

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  9. We are a 1:1 iPad school and I am so happy I decided to join this book group, because I have already been using the language of digital citizenship in my fourth grade classroom during these first few weeks. Earlier this week, I started using Canvas (an LMS) with my students. I didn't realize that there was a class chat function, but when I had the students do a sandbox session just to explore, they found chat right away. Suddenly our chat wall was filled with some appropriate and not so appropriate emojis (the dreaded poop emoji!!!). In the past, I think I would have tried to turn off chat. Instead, we've had several discussions about appropriate digital use at school, digital footprints, cyber bullying privacy, and how we interact differently with different people (code switching). We made a Venn Diagram comparing tech use at home and at school, which sparked great conversations about our purposes for using tech. As the author states, "All mistakes should be viewed as learning opportunities." So far, our chat wall looks a lot cleaner. I'm glad I had the language to address this learning opportunity.

    I'm ready to start more proactively teaching digital citizenship, rather than reacting (although these reactionary lessons have made a big impact. I already hear the students talking about being digital citizens)! Has anyone used or seen the Nearpod Common Sense Media lessons? They cost a bit of money, so I'm curious if it's worth it. If not, I'll start using the lessons on their website, as well as the INDOE.

    As I think I've mentioned before, I also plan to model fair use in my own work. I was thinking about incorporating our initial lessons in fair use to the students' selection of home screen photos on the iPads. Since they are permitted to change their home screens, this is one of their favorite activities. I think I can hook their interest that way.

    I'm looking forward to hearing others' ideas this week.

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  10. In one way, I am at a disadvantage, because I do not teach a conventional class. As the Library Media Specialist, I teach a Library Media English elective that focuses on library and research skills. I have been incorporating Digital Citizenship lessons with my 20 students, but I know that DigCit needs to be incorporated across the district. I mentioned in my last post that I have plans for my students during DigCit week this year. Since I haven’t had time to work with our Technology Committee to create a comprehensive plan this year, I am planning a daily “email blast” for our students during DigCit week. Everyday, I will send an email to the students focusing on one skill/concept. The email focus may be on specific grade levels or they may be across the entire middle and high school. Each email will include a small activity or thought provoker AND some sort of question to be answered via a google form. All correct answers will be compiled and the student’s names will be entered in a drawing for prizes at the end of the week. The key to making this work will be making it quick and engaging. The entire “lesson” should take less than 10 minutes from opening the email to answering the question. I’ve done a similar activity with my teachers during the week before Christmas and they always enjoy it. I look forward to seeing how the students react to their first email blast from the library.

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  11. I found there to be a lot of good information in chapter 5, but I was left with the feeling that this chapter was geared towards upper grades. I teach special needs students in grades K-5 in two different schools daily. I found the suggestions at the bottom of page 36 as a great starting place, especially since I need to move more slowly and reteach frequently. My hope is to lay the foundation of being a good Digital Citizen with my students. I was thinking of having the students Google them selves and then move on to posting on the Internet. I am going to look into the Common Sense Education site to see if they have information and tools that I can use with my students. I was also thinking of having my student write an email to our principal, and look at how and what we should include, or leave out of an email.

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  12. I can certainly see how this books ties in so well to the upcoming Digital Citizenship weeks. Many of the examples that are shared in the book are doable, and I really appreciate reading about what others have actually done.

    At first I was disappointed when it suggested that an administrator find one or two lead teachers to assist without mentioning the librarian/media specialist, but that was soon adjusted when the librarian at Holy Trinity was mentioned. For me, it makes perfect sense that the librarian work in collaboration with the classroom teachers. I have contacted the other media specialists in our district to see if we can coordinate our efforts across the district for September 12-16 (although having one media specialist for the ten schools does not make it easy)

    I was amazed by all of the things going on at Burlington HS. It seems like many of those students will be better prepared for some jobs than many adults.

    Last year one of our administrators did coordinate a plan to integrate many of the Common Sense Media lessons into library visits. The role of our media specialists has changed this year, so I do not believe that will happen as often across the district. Hopefully, a concerted effort during the week in September will make up for part of that loss.

    One of the most "fun" activities I did last year in relation to copyright was in having students use the search tools in google images. Most students had no idea that they exist. They also enjoyed the idea that they themselves are copyright holders.

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  13. I really enjoyed reading about what other schools were doing regarding their digital citizenship educational programs. It was really helpful and gave me a lot of ideas. I especially like the concept of a student-run help desk at school. We have a program for tech-savvy students who work with our technology department to help fix and troubleshoot iPad issues, however, I love the idea of turning it into a class and having the students create original resource materials available via a website or blog (including helpdesk videos and whatnot).

    I have my high schoolers journal a few times every week just to work on their fluency skills and I’ve been toying with the idea of doing digital journals through blogs for a while now, allowing them to self-publish their work and respond to each other’s thoughts and ideas. The only issue I see with this is that students often use these journals as a private means of communication that is strictly for teacher-student eyes only and I think the process of making these journals public might make the students more hesitant to engage in a cathartic experience or be truly honest about a topic. Maybe I could pick and choose which journals to post online..??

    I would also love to start silent, online discussions through Canvas (our online educational portal) regarding whatever story or topic we are exploring in class. This gives the students a chance to really engage with each other in a public way and I would also be able to model positive communication by engaging in the conversation as well. Again, this would have to be an at-school/in-class activity because many of our students don’t have access to the internet at home.

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    1. I loved the student-run help desk! What a great way for students experience digital citizenship first-hand. High school student would rather get advice from their peers.

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  14. Last year we sent short video clips to the homeroom teachers to show during homeroom time. I'm looking for a more effective way for teachers to incorporate digital citizenship into daily lessons without causing any extra work for the teachers. I also agree that the lessons should just be a natural part of each classroom, but I need to find ways to help the teachers learn these methods.

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  15. Well, I teach special needs students in various grades and in seven different schools so I will have to evaluate the level of understanding of what digital citizenship is with each group. This basic step will have to be accomplished by first defining digital citizenship. I like to always address new topics by finding out what previous knowledge my students have already acquired. I also agree with the quote in chapter 5, “I play dumb and the kids love it!” So I will bring up the topic and see what the students share. There is also a natural connection between character building lessons and digital citizenship so this will be my next step. I address choices and behavior a lot in my classes through the use of role playing. I think this strategy can also be applied with computer use and the internet. Then hopefully I will have access to use computers in most of my buildings so that the classes can try goggling ourselves. I know in one building, which I’m in the most, the tech department stated that all teachers need to do is email them and they will come give a presentation.

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  16. I think since I'm in preschool I would need to educate the parents more than the students. I don't think they would have much understanding of digital citizenship at this age!

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    1. As a preschool teacher I agree! I do a weekly blog that parents check each week. Here I show where I got the lessons I did that week, pictures of their kiddos interacting, and even links of short educational video I had shown in class. Just ways to connect the parents to my room so they feel like that "fly on the wall"

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  17. I agree with several above that this chapter seemed to be geared more to the upper grades. I teach 2nd. I looped this year, so I had the same students last year. I have allowed my students to get on to Twitter and tweet things that we are doing in the classroom. I also let them get on Facebook and do the same. I am with them as they are posting/tweeting. I do agree with others that have stated above that students at this young age do need adult supervision while on the internet. I think that modeling and showing the student what is on these social media sites helps. I often post what we are doing while we are working and allow it to be up in the classroom. We watch as we get likes etc.
    We haven't talked about a digital footprint yet, but I do plan to address this to try to get that message across early. I think there was a bully lesson once with a shattered plate or piece of paper that was torn or broken, you can tape it or glue it but the scare is always there, perhaps similar to our digital footprint?
    I am very curious about the curriculum for the Common Sense Media. I would really like to get into the lessons a bit. I am going to check with our technology ladies and see if this is what we are using to teach. She does a great job with our students.

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    1. Parental involvement and supervision with the younger aged students is key! Involving them in lessons and activities is as important, if not more, than simply just discussing it with our students. Maybe a joint activity or assignment could be completed together to help promote the involvement of the parents.

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  18. I have a few ideas to integrate digital citizenship into my everyday curriculum and not just during the digital citizenship unit. One way is when we do discussions on our LMS, Schoology. I've never gone in depth before on using appropriate responses and I realize I should do that. I've also really been wanting to start a Facebook page for my class and I think using that to teach them appropriate content to post could be great. Plus I'll be getting my class out there into the community and making sure what I'm doing in seen. Only problem would be access to Facebook at school!

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  19. I really believe that digital citizenship should be a part of the school's culture. I know we are planning to incorporate it during homeroom while we do our Warrior Way activities. Using this time to build our culture and community also allows us to ensure all students are receiving the message and that is has some consistency to it.

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    1. I agree that digital citizenship should be part of the school culture. Our school presently has a citizenship program that each grade level takes a turn presently to the whole school during a pride program. Digital citizenship should be added as one of the character traits that we should cover during our pride programs.

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  20. I have been writing my posts after our Monday morning department meetings, and the last two weeks something has come up that directly relates to our reading. This morning someone mentioned that the kids used to have to take a Digital Citizenship class on Canvas, but then she wondered if we still do that. As far as I know we do not and I am not sure why not. I can definitely ask our Director of Technology about that. In my own classroom where I teach high school math, I find that so far my best lessons have been the "casual classroom conversations" that Meyer describes. I do use the discussions on Canvas and I have had to remind my students that posting an inappropriate comment can be much more incriminating that just verbally making a comment in class, as the evidence is there for all to see. I know I should do more in my classroom and I have enjoyed reading what others are doing to get ideas!

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  21. "Incorporating digital citizenship lessons organically into the fabric of daily lessons is probably the most effective approach...." Considering this, and assuming you have educated yourself in the different areas of digital citizenship, what can you do in your classroom to teach your students about digital citizenship. Think not only about the focused lessons you can do, but also how you model things like privacy, copyright, fair use, communication, safety.

    I think the author makes a great comparison that we teach our children how to drive and are diligent of having them learn all the rules and yet when it comes to technology we are not always as consistent. I think digital citizenship is extremely important as we become more engrained in technology and the push to use it increases. Often parents give children cell phones or tablets and haven't fully conveyed the appropriate usage. Incorporating digital citizenship into the classroom can solve many problems that educators fear will happen and thus tend to shy away from that. Instead of being proactive we choose not to incorporate tech or do not give students the opportunity to interact with it in our classes. I feel a huge one in our school is internet bullying. Students feel empowered when sitting behind a keyboard and say things they often wouldn't when in front of a person. Also, since it is cyber they can continue to bully way after school hours are over. By addressing this first we can hit many areas of concern rather than being reactive in the situation. For older students citations and plagiarism are key and will prepare them for college and beyond.

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  22. I am really enjoying reading the responses! I teach our freshmen Preparing for College and Careers class, which would be a perfect avenue to purposefully incorporate digital citizenship lessons. We cover an array of topics in that class and all freshmen have to take it, so it really would be a great place to start. I like the idea of the "My Digital Life" lesson that Holy Trinity uses. I would also like to incorporate some lessons with my Early Childhood Education class. They work with our on-site preschool each day, so it's very important for them to understand digital citizenship from the "teacher" stand point. I could take the lessons in a little bit different direction with them, since they are seeing things from the other side of the table.

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  23. copyright is one area with middle/high school students that needs a lot of work on our behalf. Students, and some staff, feel just because the image is on the internet they can just grab it and use it. We need to show our students, and model for them, how to find pictures, etc. that are labeled for reuse.

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    1. I agree. Students are always cutting and pasting things into projects or getting pictures for Powerpoints without showing the copyright info.

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  24. Today was the first day of school and I chose to include digital citizenship as part of the classroom rules discussion. We talked about protecting your password and when is it okay to go to a site without asking the teacher's permission. We also talked about closing a web page to prevent the teacher from seeing it. The few higher functioning MOCD students responded.

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  25. I teach at the elementary level and the book suggested making digital citizenship a part of the daily routine. It mentioned that some of the most effective lessons are those done informally where classroom conversation is involved. This might be the most effective way for me to integrate it into my curriculum since I only see my students for a short 40 minute period 1x a week.

    The book also suggested phasing digital citizenship in one chunk at a time. This might make it less overwhelming to those not knowing where to begin.

    Another great suggestion the book offered was having the students teach you about the apps they use. This will give you the chance to see how students are using them.

    I believe the above mentioned strategies are all good ways to teach digital citizenship at the elementary level. And of course parent education is key as well. Parental supervision is of the most importance so that students have guidance to acceptable use at home.

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  26. As the school year has started, this book club has helped me start having a conversation with students about digital citizenship. Our goals and ideas have been posted. I had a wonderful response from a 7th grade student on her definition of digital citizenship. She stated, "That is simple to define and follow. We learned that being a good citizen is following the laws, contributing to society, and protecting the rights, liberty, and property of others. Just do the same thing digitally." This statement seemed to have an ah ha moment and helped my students have a better vision about plagiarism and using items such as pictures from others, or making negative posts about others. The goal includes making positive contributions, as well as building the "brand" they would like to be remembered by. These goals and definition are posted to be a reminder of what to do with each performance assessment we complete.

    I have told them about my goal to follow copy right rules and have them looking out for how well I follow it. I created an activity tomorrow that falls a bit short and am hoping they catch it before I have to point it out to them.

    Digital citizenship has become part of our culture and conversation. I love the ideas being shared from others. Sharing ideas at PD meetings for teachers to model and encourage is important. I will make that suggestion, especially corespondent with Digital Citizenship Week. Michelle Green is sending out multiple messages in multiple forums on resources available to involve parents as well.

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    1. Valerie, I love the connection your 7th graders made! Do we have your/their permission to use their statement?

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  27. As the school librarian, I already give presentations to our freshman about web search skills, citing sources and copyright. I have a few websites that I point out that are geared toward students and contain images that are not copyrighted so it can be specifically for educational use.

    I would like to do more regarding internet ethics and include tips on sharing or oversharing online.

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    1. Do you have any information that you could share on teaching web search skills, citing sources and copyright?

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  28. As an English teacher, I often have to deal with the issue of plagiarism. Plagiarism has always been a problem, but the Internet makes it so much easier to just "copy" what you find. I try to talk to my kids about the importance of doing your own work. We discuss what they would feel like if something that had worked really hard on was taken by someone as their own.

    I also talk to my students about the fact that once they put something out onto social media or the Internet, it's there forever. While I realize this is a difficult concept for 14-year-olds to understand, I still talk about it regularly. I believe the more they hear it, the more aware they will be.

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  29. As I have continued to mention...I am struggling finding ways to incorporate digital citizenship with 3 year olds. I as well as someone mentioned that teaching younger kiddos we don't believe that internet exploring should be done without adult supervision. One idea that I came up with is blogging with another class. Sending notes and talking with them about what a "nice" letter might include. I know that kiddos love connecting with other kiddos and this may be the first step to teaching kiddos how to "not cyber bully" I can always reinforce how we talk with others and treat others during the letter. We could even role play specific situations...both nice and not so nice (then correcting the not so nice ones to model good citizenship).

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    1. I think that this approach with 3 year olds is a perfect start! It's so important to teach kids how to talk and treat one another. Reinforcing with a class blog, as a whole class, is a great idea.

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  30. I teach just about every lesson using google slides. My lessons contain pictures to help students better understand a concept. I can teach and show students how to properly cite pictures in a presentation and then have them create a presentation where they have to cite pictures. This is something Susan suggests on page 37.
    I use google classroom and have students respond to each others comments to a question or post. I model how to respond to someone's post and then students practice it. I agree with Susan in that the possibilities are only limited by our imagination. I enjoy reading the ideas of others!

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  31. I have been using some of the terminology from the book as a starting point. Here at ENE the third graders will be using chrome books for the first time this year. However, many have iPads or tablets at home. They have transitioned well to the chrome book and our lessons have been very helpful. Twice a month our technology building rep uses his own curriculum from the technology department as well as additional searches he has added. The students come back to class eager to continue what they were doing.
    We use google classroom, as well as, some of the internet based reading curriculum tools with our students. This gives them a platform in which to communicate with me and try their hand at email in a safe environment. Students in the upper grades have used Edmodo and their google email "allowed" this year. The teachers have shared so far the students have been very kind to each other.

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    1. I am just beginning to use google classroom. I am happy to hear it is working well with your 3rd graders. I hope to get my 4th class communicating with me so we can practice safe social media skills. Any insights or suggestions are welcome!

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  32. I am really interested in the Common Sense lessons. This sounds like a great place to start the conversation with elementary students.
    My building just received our first Chromebooks to share. At our faculty technology meeting on Monday, the subject of digital citizenship arose. We had insightful conversations about not just how to keep our students safe, but also how to teach children to keep themselves safe in the ever-changing digital world.
    I love the idea of a "Digital Drivers License." I think the kids would really enjoy that. Something to think about as we move forward.
    Here we go! My 4th graders will use the Chromebooks for the first time tomorrow! I will keep you all posted!

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  33. I agree with many of the others that starting with common terminology is a safe place. I plan to incorporate more Google Classroom into our classwork/assignments this year. I believe that discussing the ideas of what plagiarism is and is not would be useful. Sharing with students which sites are helpful to go on and which we know for certain to avoid.

    So these "Common Sense Lessons" seem like a great spring board for where students need to be launched when getting started.

    Our class will be in the computer lab for 30 minutes each week, but I think the lessons have to start prior to attending the lab and then extend outside of the lab. We will have to sell what we are presenting to the students and parents. Believing in the importance so much that they see how important the topic truly is and sense our urgency from our excitement and lessons.

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  35. I think that like Susan Bearden suggests in the book, my district is the beginning stages of digcit education and we need to educate teachers, first and foremost. This is where I hope to start.

    In my role, I constantly struggle with how to integrate dig cit in a meaningful way. My plans for the year are to encourage teachers to choose a lesson to integrate digcit topics, as suggested in the chapter. I also want to provide teachers with lots of ideas- I'm thinking of a digcit newsletter that provides education on a dig cit topic at both the adult and student level and ends with lessons for teachers to use with students. I really want to focus on getting students involved in our efforts as well.

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  36. I am planning to teach digital citizenship in my classes with 10th thru 12th graders by every time we have an assignment that requires the internet hitting a part about digital citizenship starting with cyber bulling and teaching the ways to be a good digital citizenship. I think it is very important to teach students of today about this because most times they are not the best digital citizens.

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  37. With my moderate special education students, 1:1 is always a challenge! They love their computers but need constant reminders. They need to be taught and reminded not to share passwords with anyone. They sometimes "accidentally" find inappropriate materials and then share with others. I have also had students sending emails with questionable content to staff and random students. Teaching digital citizenship is a daily and often hourly occurance in my classroom. Unfortunately, students do lose the privilege of having a computer due to numerous computer use violations.

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    1. I have subbed in a Mo/Severe classroom so I know this is a challenge. Our students were starting to learn how to use a computer last year preparing for the 1:1 device this year. A couple did lose their computer privilege because they weren't doing as they were told.

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  38. I really enjoyed reading this chapter! Resources always seems to be at the forefront of why some teachers shy away from tackling a topic such as digital citizenship. The mention of the Common Sense Education Digital Citizenship curriculum makes me believe that a program like this should be provided to all schools. Combining this program along with character education for the lower grades just makes sense.
    One way my team makes students aware of their "voice" is by using padlet. Students can see everyone's response and who made it. I see that my students are now beginning to think a little more before posting. They are also commenting on other students' posts more respectfully. Hopefully, this will carry over into their real digital world.
    Our media specialist will also be sharing with our team and students how to blog. This will be entirely new to me and I can honestly admit that it scares me. I hope the experience is a positive one.
    Our school is also participating in the Global Read Aloud. We will hopefully be communicating with not only students in the US but in other countries. We want to make a good digital impression! (if that's how you say it)

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  39. I forgot to mention that I'd like to find out more about the "Digital Driver's License. Over and out!

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    1. From a parent perspective, my daughter completed the DDL in 6th grade. She is now a 10th grader. There has never been any review or ongoing dialogue about digital responsibilities/literacies. The DDL can be a great way to start an education program, when it is paired with ongoing lessons and interactions. Learn about the DDL at https://otis.coe.uky.edu/DDL/launch.php

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  40. I'm getting ready to begin a new chapter in my career. I'm going from elementary school education to being an educational advisor at a university. I plan on incorporating many of the ideas I've learned in this book. I especially love the idea of helping students with creating professional profiles (such as Linked In) and teaching the importance of keeping personal information separate from their "online resume".
    I'm unsure of the use of technology by the professors at this point, but I'm definitely going to inquire about it. I also love the idea of engaging professionals in the classroom via social media.

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    1. That sounds exciting! Congratulations on starting a new chapter in your profession!

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  41. Working at an alternative school, we don't have many things to deal with. The students use GradPoint to do their work. The main thing we have to do is make sure they are working on the lessons/tests and stay off of their phones. Some of them like to play games or watch YouTube when they should be working. Some of them do supplement the lessons with their own research so I think teaching them good websites to use as resources would be helpful. I think we could still show them how to use social media in a good way because several of our students don't have parents who care or who would teach them right from wrong.

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  42. I want to figure out how to incorporate classroom blogs into my environment. I think I will probably try it first through our LMS Canvas. This allows for some more control over what is put out there as the students learn how to comment, what to write about and what is appropriate. Another thing that I like about doing this is my students can have dialogue with other students of mine but who are not in their particular class. I think students assume a sense of boldness when they are not looking directly at the person they are "speaking" to and perhaps say things they wouldn't in other situations. I really want to work on this with the students. I also want to address how what they say and do today in social media can and will stay with them a long, long time. Finally, I want to help students begin to think about building a digital resume where they are projecting themselves in a good light that will speak well of them.

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  43. I think I will use a blog and book club similar to this set up to help kids learn about responding appropriately on the internet. Not only will I frame it as, "This could be apart of you forever," I would also use it in a way for kids to learn how to write in a clear and concise way. It would be a great tool to teach sentence structure.

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    1. With the help of our media specialist, we introduced blogging to my 5th grade homeroom. we stressed the importance of tone and privacy. We will be joining many other schools this year in the Global Read Aloud and practicing good digital citizenship will be the #1 expectation.

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  44. Last year was the first year that I worked with Google classroom. I was able to show them in real time how a mean or inappropriate comment can be passed along to others even though the author had deleted what was posted. It opened their eyes to some of the possible consequences of misusing online sites.
    I plan on continuing with Google classroom, as well as with the other Google apps for education, this year. Through projects and lessons I hope to get into meaningful discussions and lessons with my students about digital footprints, copyright, and privacy.

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  45. We use technology throughout our school day in the preschool setting. It is interesting how many of our students utilize tablets, computers and iphones on a daily basis outside of the school environment. One thought I had after reading this chapter is to encourage the students to ask for parent permission before going online or playing a game. Teaching 3 and 4 year old students the words, phrases and sentences they need to use to "ask" might be a great beginning step on their digital citizenship path.

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  46. Here are some examples of how I can incorporate dig. cit. lessons into a daily lesson:
    When using slide show presentations, I will cite where I found the images/information that I am presenting. Students will no-doubt ask if they need to do the same. When I assign a slide show, I can demonstrate how to find images that are free to use, and teach proper citation. I can demonstrate how to cite/credit the source for anything I am using in class. I can also explain about copyright --why we can’t watch “movies for fun” instead of just saying that we can’t. I can ask students to reflect (in Spanish) on what type of digital footprint they are creating, either in their assigned Spanish diaries or in conversation.
    Also I am planning on upgrading my “chocolate chapter” unit for my Spanish 3 so that it complies with what I have learned so far. Taking this one unit at a time makes the prospect less daunting.

    I also like the idea of “promoting a culture of kindness online.” I’m not sure what that would look like yet.

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  47. I really do ten joy reading about all of the ideas in this book, but am at a lose as to use it in high school math classes. My school is just beginning to use technology more, but digital citizenship has never been a topic that has been discussed. My goal is to start the conversations and try to push for a more updated technological curriculum. I would love to have more use of technology in my math classes. I know there is a group pushing for more and I need to be more involved with them. Most teachers in the school require more information about digital citizenship before we teach our students.

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    1. As a fellow math teacher, I understand. One digital citizenship role that I have is helping students stay on task. Using a digital device supplies so many more ways for students to be distracted: scrolling from one page to another, 'watching a movie', chatting and maybe slicing in some math would be the approach some students would take if permitted. Narrowing the focus for my students to accomplish online math tasks is one way that I can help them work productively under my watch and perhaps apply that habit elsewhere. Have you used desmos.com with your students?

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    2. I have used it with my smartboard, but our school does not have Ipads or chromebooks. It does help with understanding because the graphing is more accurate than doing it manually. When they use their own phones they are unwilling to let you see what they are doing.

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  48. During the first week of school, I showed a video I had previously made that focused on my experiences with an encouraging teacher vs. a discouraging teacher. At the end of the video, credits were listed because I had used the art work of others to illustrate my message. The first conversation our group engaged in centered around the credits, and why giving credit was necessary. Finding opportunities to instill citizenship into daily lessons really isn't difficult; it is a mindset. I am getting ready to create a classroom blogging site, and I know that students may want to use this site as a means to communicate their negative feelings toward others. I have decided to have each student read and sign a "User's Contract" before beginning this project. Hopefully, this step will signify the seriousness of digital etiquette.

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  49. My district now includes Digital Citizenship in their curriculum for all grades since we recently went 1:1. I think the best way to have conversations with students about Digital Citizenship is to have honest conversations with them when it arises. In the book, the author mentioned how class discussions stemmed from student inquiries were the best way to present and converse these new ideas, like communications and safety on the internet. Additionally, I want to embed these ideas, like copy right, into the projects that my students and I do by reviewing citations and giving credit where credit is due, especially for pictures. I have had students cite pictures in the past, but this year, I want them to understand why we cite these pictures, and how they are just as valuable for information as are the articles they read for projects.

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  50. My district now includes Digital Citizenship in their curriculum for all grades since we recently went 1:1. I think the best way to have conversations with students about Digital Citizenship is to have honest conversations with them when it arises. In the book, the author mentioned how class discussions stemmed from student inquiries were the best way to present and converse these new ideas, like communications and safety on the internet. Additionally, I want to embed these ideas, like copy right, into the projects that my students and I do by reviewing citations and giving credit where credit is due, especially for pictures. I have had students cite pictures in the past, but this year, I want them to understand why we cite these pictures, and how they are just as valuable for information as are the articles they read for projects.

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  51. While I was teaching fourth grade, we did a lot with Google applications. I would use Google Classroom as a tool to spark discussions, assign assignments, and ask questions. This was a great way to model safe practices while using digital devices. I would model appropriate responses to the students while the students also had to respond to each other. The students knew they were being monitored which helped in how they would practice digital citizenship. Also, whenever the students would get on their devices we would review the rules for using the devices properly and how and what they should be doing. I would then walk around and monitor them during their use of the devices. I believe this was a great way to monitor and also model for the students digital citizenship.

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  52. With my school not being 1:1 I feel it adds more of a challenge in incorporating lessons. We do have limited time in the computer lab, but it is a place to start. We do use a few programs where they can message me or can add a friend from our class. I think by starting discussions about those programs would be the best start with actual technology use within our school. I have already started discussing being a good digital citizen during our character counts lessons with topics such as asking parents for permission to use the Internet and not writing mean things about people online.

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  53. I have two different age groups that I can easily incorporate lessons I found on Common Sense education. With my elementary students, I am going to begin with Common Sense education's lessons on keywords and plagiarism. Those two free lessons mesh very nicely with the first research essay we are writing this year. Next, I plan to use the information on this site to help my middle school students begin to understand Internet safety. We will also use the toolkit and videos to explore Cyberbullying. While teaching plagiarism is not new to me, the information presented in the Keywords lesson is very helpful in showing the students how different search engines yield different results. Teaching about Internet safety and Cyberbullying will be new for me, and I'm looking forward to using the resources I have just learned through this class.

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  54. Oops I forgot to include the URL for the two specifically cited lesson plans:

    https://d2e111jq13me73.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/3-5-unit1-thekeytokeywords.pdf

    https://d2e111jq13me73.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/3-5-unit1-whoseisitanyway.pdf

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    1. Thank you for sharing the sites. I plan on looking at them and seeing how I can build them into my class.

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    2. Thank you too for sharing! These will be shared with my 5th grade team.

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  55. I have woven the Digital Citizenship into my class time by having the class work on a research project. As I have introduced how to do a research project I have woven into the lesson proper use of the computer and responsibility of the student to use proper guidelines and safety. As we tackle each step we practice the safety concerns for the classroom and at home.

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  56. Wow! This is exactly what we need at our virtual school. I think every child entering our school should have to take a course on digital citizenship. This course could introduce students to online educational tools, proper ways to establish a digital profile through different social media outlets. How to create a positive professional online profile and also how to be responsible with the information they view and share online. I would love to learn more about the programs/curriculum that are out there and how we may use/alter those programs for our students.

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  57. I am a firm believer that the younger we start the better. I know that it seems so young to start with a preschooler but I believe if we wait until we think students are ready then "bad" habits have already started. While going over my policies and procedures for my 5th grade I really began to open conversations about digital citizenship and how it is so important to begin a positive digital footprint. Once again, it is so hard for me to instruct them solely on the 40 minutes I see them in a week so I really have to rely on teachers to continue conversations in classrooms. I am looking forward to the Digital Citizenship Week and have subscribed to the community. I think that is the perfect place to start. I look forward to browsing the site and being introduced to a variety of ideas. I also need to remind teachers to continue the lessons I introduce so our students are prepared and protected in the ever changing digital world.

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  58. With the little ones, I believe I can incorporate digital citizenship whenever we are using technology. This would be whenever I am using technology as well in front of them. I think it would be easy to implement, just another step for me and my planning. I think the younger they are when we start digital citizenship, the more likely it is that it will stick and grow with them. Right off the bat, I am thinking of the rules I have in place in my classroom and how we go over these multiple times a day. The digital citizenship "rules" could be a spin off of regular rules, these rules we could go over every time we are using technology.

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  59. After reading this chapter, I feel I do some of the things. We use Canvas at my school and you can upload files, videos, etc. My students and I discuss what are the proper guidelines and use of materials from the internet. I make sure my students know that if they upload something they must give proper credit.

    We also have discussions about social media and the importance for their safety. We discuss this in person and also on a discussion board I make through canvas. They need to realize what they think is cute and funny now, may hurt them in the long run as they get older.

    These practices hopefully carry over to home also.

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  60. The principal in my building just created a Facebook page for us. For me to reach the most parents that is where I plan to go. I loved the idea of having students create educational materials over digital citizenship. Right now I have them create short commercials over manners but I could easily incorporate digital citizenship into that, it would go hand in hand with our manners unit!

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  61. One idea that I thought of while reading this chapter is to have one focus area per month. For example, the school year could start of with an overall introduction to digital citizenship. From there, one new topic could be integrated on a monthly basis. That topic could then be worked into everyday curriculum as often as possible. I really liked the section from chapter 5 that discussed how schools and teachers are implementing digital citizenship into their everyday lessons.
    Including the current digital citizenship focus in whatever home communication tool is used would also allow parents to practice and encourage their kids to practice digital citizenship at home as well.

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  63. After reading Chapter 5, I am becoming interested in the idea of creating a personal brand online. This is a new concept for me and I plan to investigate this one. I have absolutely no idea what this would look like for practical application. After learning more about branding, maybe I can design a project for my regular-level English 12 class that would help them .

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  64. After reading Chapter 5, I am becoming interested in the idea of creating a personal brand online. This is a new concept for me and I plan to investigate this one. I have absolutely no idea what this would look like for practical application. After learning more about branding, maybe I can design a project for my regular-level English 12 class that would help them .

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  65. In the library one of the things I strive to do is model. Model giving credit to sources, using good research skills, etc. on a regular basis. If students see us using images that they know we didn’t create without any explanation of where they came from, they think that’s okay to do themselves. I also look for opportunities to bring up digital citizenship topics naturally. For example, I was covering some iPad basics with 5th graders the other week, and one of the classes I helped them set up their OneDrive accounts online. The Microsoft website asked if they wanted to save their passwords on their personal iPads. They asked me what they should do. I told them that since it’s a personal iPad it’s up to them, but that if it was a private device such as are card catalog computers, then you would want to make sure to hit no and explained why. We do also do some explicit digital citizenship lessons as well on topics like privacy and digital footprint.

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    1. I appreciate that you address crediting the creator of an image. I have been surprised at how often I have seen adults fail to give credit to the artist when they have borrowed an image- it seems that we know to credit the words of others, but not always the artist.

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  66. Because of the classes I teach, it is hard to work digital citizenship into my lesson plans. However, in my years of teaching and assigning research papers, I see a huge need to help students understand how to properly give credit to the sources they have used. Many students don't understand how paraphrase. There are some that will plagiarize without even understand that what they are doing. Also, teaching students about credible sources needs to be something that we are pushing. Too many students want to use Wikipedia for everything, not understanding that anyone can edit articles with or without fact checking. Getting students to understand giving credit and digger deeper will improve digital citizenship.

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  67. I can easily integrate Digital Citizenship lessons into my activities as a 9th grade English teacher. This year the freshman received their first laptops. Providing lessons on plagiarism, as well as privacy issues, will be important for the students to hear. It is important for students to understand that they need to not believe everything that they find is a fact. I hope to use some of the Common Sense lessons as well.

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