Saturday, August 13, 2016

Digital Citizenship Week 4: Educating Faculty and Staff

In the role you are in at your school or district, how can you help educate your fellow teachers and administrators about digital citizenship?

A few reminders. Be sure you register for the book club. If you would like PGPs for participating in this book club, we have to have your email address and we get that from your registration. If you aren't sure if you completed it already, just complete the form again. Make sure you are signed in to Google when you submit your comments. If you do not, your comments show up as from "unknown" and we don't know that you commented. If you have not joined the Digital Citizenship Community of Practice, that is a great place to continue this conversation. Also, visit our website to learn more about Indiana's digital citizenship initiatives.

Next week we will discuss chapter 5, "Educating Students." By the way, have you Googled yourself yet?

129 comments:

  1. I plan on talking to my administrators about this book. I think it is a great resource for good digital citizenship. I think this book would be a good way for the staff at the school I work at to become better educated on digital citizenship. I have learned some things I did not know from this book.

    By the way, I did google myself. It appears I am quite boring.

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    1. Too funny, Sharon. The lesson plan on Googling Yourself that I shared in the DigCit Community, includes setting a goal to develop your digital identity. Worse than boring is nonexistent!

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    2. My students are doing part of that lesson tomorrow:) I have had them Google themselves for years, but I like the additional steps to search themselves!

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    3. During a staff meeting we googled ourselves and were amazed with what popped up under the images. Many of our Facebook photos were under the google search engine.

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    4. I think this book would be a great read for my staff. It is a clear concise read that is full of great resources.

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    5. I will also recommend the book to our staff. It is a great way to start and I also think that following up at a staff meeting might help if someone has questions or ideas to share. I will also be doing the lesson to google yourself. I also think that I will let our staff know about the Digital Citizenship Community.

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    6. I didn't see one photo of myself when I googled myself and I am perfectly fine with that.

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    7. I agree, Nancy. I've learned a lot from the book, but I'm realizing that there's so much more out there to learn. I'm not sure that I'm prepared to teach anyone about digital citizenship yet, but I would definitely like to be part of a school-wide discussion.
      I also Googled myself, and I was surprised at how much personal information showed up.

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  2. As Sharon stated, I enjoyed the Googling ourselves activity. I learned something new as I followed the lesson shared with us by Michelle Green on searching for our name multiple ways and seeing the different results that appear. Thanks again, Michelle, for sharing so many resources.

    As a teacher, I can be a "brand ambassador" for our school by modeling #digcit. I can model it in my classroom with my communications with students and parents. I can teach/communicate it as we research and produce products throughout the year. As many students use Google Classroom with me for the first time each year, there is always a need for conversations as they get excited to use the messaging and chatting components. I have learned through this book that I need to have more conversations about acceptable and fair use policies, model it, and ensure the students are following it through a variety of digital activities.

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    1. I would also like more information about acceptable and fair use policies and need to communicate this to my students.

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  3. I have already shared the title of his book with our superintendent. Eventually, I would like to see a digital citizenship corner in our faculty lunchroom or maybe highlighted briefly at each monthly faculty meeting. I plan to meet with my principal to discuss how we can educate our faculty and staff on a regular basis.

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    1. Like you I have shared the title of this book with a few peers. I haven't mentioned it yet to my principal but plan to in the near future. I was surprised last week when I did attend a technology boot camp in my district and Digital Citizenship was not even mentioned. The focus of the boot camp just addressed different apps and programs to use with our students.

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    2. You have a great suggestion of a digital citizenship corner (I am thinking bulletin board.) in the faculty lounge or anywhere in the building depending on the focus.

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    3. I created a bulletin board in our main hallway. I hope it creates a lot of discussion as the year progresses.

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    4. We have a small bookshelf in our teacher workroom with several PD books. This would be a great book to add to that shelf.

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    5. Nancy, is there any way you can share a picture of your bulletin board? That is a great idea!

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    6. I love your idea! We had to watch a video on our own on digital citizenship at our corporation.

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    7. I like the idea of adding digital citizenship to our PD meetings each week. It would be great to hear how other teachers in my building are teaching digital citizenship to their students.

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    8. I have a PD shelf in the school library. I have already ordered some copies to add to the shelf, and I will have it as a highlight of my Digital Citizenship Week display.

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  4. We do need something to address the many facets of this chapter. All staff take a basic online course in digital citizenship (largely on cyberbullying and sexual harassment),but too many things are not covered. I frequently find myself trying to diplomatically explain that reward movies are not acceptable without a license.

    I do reach about half of our intermediate staff, less than one quarter of our middle school staff when they bring their students to the library and we have digital citizenship mini-lessons. This should be incorporated into faculty or department meetings. I do know that our district technology department does an excellent job of taking student data privacy into account with the purchases and roll outs that they have made. One additional thing that needs to be addressed is the apps that teachers recommend; often they suggest students use ones that have a strict 13 or older requirement. I need to develop a list of suggested apps that adhere to the age restrictions. I have seen them before on the net, but they almost immediately become out of date.

    I've noticed a change when I "google myself" (and others; you do too, don't you?) It seems like twitter is almost always the first one that shows up. I assume that the number of times pages are accessed has something to do with the order the results appear. Generally, our school website shows up second for me, followed by my blog (where I rarely post; I'd better change that, or people will see I don't keep it up and move on), then Facebook. Other sites such as Linked in, organizations I belong to, and a couple of blog posts I've written for organizations show up early. Surprisingly, one short happy birthday notice to my nephew two years ago on Google+ pops up early.

    One thing to note: if I use google with my given name, Susan Highley, a successful realtor in Pittsburgh dominates the results. Just like with using synonyms to improve a search, slight differences in names can change results.

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    1. When I google myself, I find a list of obitutaries!

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    2. Well this gave me a good little laugh! I think googling names would be a great initial activity at a staff meeting to get everybody's attention!! Then follow it with an introduction of "digital citizenship" much like you would do in your classroom! It would also be helpful to have open discussion on ways to iplemenet this with students and parents and get the ball rolling! A team for digital citizenship would be nice to conduct an information night for those who are 1:1, back to school night possibly?, and continue to bring fresh ideas, reminders, and signs around school technology for students to be good citizens!

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  5. I made sure to Google myself with both of my names. While my married name has nothing that links to me, my other one does. All of it was positive as I listened to my professors as Ball State when attending college about the large impact that the internet would have on our lives. I now feel extremely fortunate to have gone thru college as the internet was vastly expanding.
    I love how another teacher at my (very small) school district told me about this book club because we both teach at the elementary schools and can share with both of them the knowledge we have learned. I love my coworkers; they are all further into their teaching years minus one or two. I feel as though I can help educate them on the importance of separating their personal accounts and making additional ones for educational purposes.

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    1. I think that having separate accounts for professional and another for personal is a very smart thing to do! Our DARE officer stressed to us during a staffing that we really need to limit the interaction with students online. That it was a very open area and had vast potential for something to be misinterpreted, then we as educators could be looking at legal trouble.

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  6. Well the first step is to share with my colleagues that I am involved in the elearning book club, which I’m not sure they are all aware of the existence. I feel that if I let them know that I have a little experience with using the elearning club it will add credibility when I share my information I have learned from reading Digitial Citizenship. I will also share this book with my building principal. I am also in a position that allows me to travel to several schools and I’m sure during the school year that I will have the opportunity to share this information in those schools.

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    1. I like your idea of sharing this elearning book club opportunity with your colleagues. I, too, have told others about this book club. It is relevant to people at all levels of technological comfort. I plan to share ideas with my department at our weekly department meetings.

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  7. I plan to talk to my principal about this book, and the work shop that I attended over the summer at another school. My morning school is going 1:1 with I-Pads, hopefully by the end of next week.
    I have Googled myself and was interested in what came up. There was another person with a very similar name that also came up. There was some information about me from my employer, regarding being voted approval of my teaching contract, and some blogs that I had done when taking a class when I was attending college. I lead a very boring life. I do not Facebook, or Tweet out anything, guess I should start catching up with the rest of the educators around me!

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  8. I will share info I learned with my colleagues and share the name of the book with them. It had many useful ideas in the book. When I googled my name many other Janet Bowen's came up so it was hard to find info about me.

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  9. As teachers we are given opportunities on professional development days (usually e-learning days) to share information that we have gained from our individual PD. This would be a great time for me and a couple of others from my building participating in this book blog to share Information gleaned here. I have never had any employee digital citizenship training in my district other than signing an AUP 15 or more years ago. What I know about FERPA comes from having children in college over the past seven years; only recently did I hear of a need to be acquainted with it at the secondary level. I think I speak for most of my colleagues when I say that our sense of digital citizenship comes from what each of us possess as common courtesy and respect for each other. As a district entering its fifth year of 1:1 device use, I am ashamed at how little training we have shared. Encouraging other teachers to participate in the Indiana Digital Citizenship week, joining the Digital Citizenship Community of Practice, along with the Indiana's digital citizenship initiatives, we have several resources that we can offer each other. Thanks for bringing so many of these to our attention.

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    1. You have written so many of the hinge I was thinking after this chapter. The discussion of FERPA is something that I have felt worried about in the past, but I wasn't sure about the guidelines so I just shied away from using resources. Did you check out the Denver Public Schools resources? The book mentions a video, but there are other useful documents as well. They have a consent form for parents for online resources. https://academictechnologymenu.dpsk12.org/studentdataprivacy.aspx

      I plan to introduce this to my technology coordinator. Perhaps parents are already signing something in my district and I don't know it.

      I love that you have a set time to share your individual PD. I'm planning to ask my principal if I can share some of the resources from this book and the State's digital initiatives.

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    2. Things not "hinge!"

      Since I'm posting again, I might as well
      share that I found the document that was referenced about social media use very informative too, since I am using both Twitter and Facebook for my classroom right now. Here is a link: http://www.uft.org/files/attachments/doe-social-media-guidelines.pdf. I realized that I need to disconnect these from my personal social media.

      Also, does anyone have a link to the companion website that the author keeps referencing? I cannot find it.

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    3. Meghann, we tweeted Corwin to see if they could give us the answer to when the companion website for the book will be available.

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    4. I was also wondering about that! Thanks!

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    5. On a college visit day with my daughter, I first heard of FERPA. On Registration Day, students and parents, in separate sessions, were given more explanation of FERPA. I was surprised I had never heard of it as a high school teacher. ???? Another example of an important item that falls through the cracks in my district.

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  10. As the media center specialists and school technology coordinator at my school, I will be able to have PD for teachers and staff, and I will also be able to set up digital citizenship presentations for different groups in the student population. We like the book so much, that we are going to use it for a teacher and staff book club choice. We are already starting to plan events for digital citizenship week in conjunction with our schools TeenPower/SADD group.

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  11. I think this would be a great "staff read" book, even though no one really loves when those get assigned. :-) I also would consider just pulling out a few key points from each chapter and emailing them out each week. Nothing that takes long to read, but just some helpful tips.

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    1. I love the idea of putting an idea a week into a weekly email. "Digital Citizenship Tip of the Week!" This would feel useful to me as a teacher and not overwhelming!

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    2. Defining the reading as PD training that could be used when renewing our license would be a great incentive.

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    3. Great ideas! I love the title, "Digital Citizenship Tip of the Week!"

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    4. I love the tip of the week idea too. While I also agree with staff assigned books not always being an enjoyable read, the nice thing about this books is that it's not very long and it has a lot of great ideas.

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    5. Jenny, what a fantastic idea! A weekly tip would be manageable and informative without taking up much time. I think you are right, teachers don't like to be told to read a book. Luckily, many teachers at my high school do participate in the DOE eLearning Book Clubs. We have talked it up positively, which has encouraged more teachers to participate whether they need the PGP's or not. We are also lucky that many teachers in our building love to improve themselves and readily accept reading professional books.

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  12. It is fitting that this was our reading this week, as we spent part of our department meeting this morning trying to find the RUP that we are all supposed to sign (we never did find it). When we first rolled out the Ipads three years ago digital citizenship was a big buzz word, but I have not heard it as much lately. I feel like, as a freshmen teacher, I may need to remind our administration of the need to treat each freshmen class and new teacher as new users. Even though many of them are veterans with their devices and social media, I think the stakes change when they enter high school. I don't know that I would be the one to take charge in educating the faculty and new students about digital citizenship, but we have several people who work in IT who did a wonderful job when the Ipads were introduced. I suppose I can just encourage them to keep doing what they have done in the past!

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  13. I am going to send my administrator an e-mail about Kirk Anderson's video addressing FERPA. I could not find the companion web resource for this book though I did find the site. In addition my e-mail will ask if our school corporation is aware of E-Rate and if we are in compliance with CIPA. The funds from E-Rate may help our district become a 1:1 corporation.
    I did Google myself and found my name on the Ratemyteacher web site. I have not been rated. That did not surprise me.

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  14. Since I'm department head and part of the DigCit Leadership committee at my school, I am working closely with administrators and other teachers to implement this initiative at our school.

    These roles give me the opportunity to interact with those that are teaching this in their class and get feedback on how it's going.

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    1. I love that your school has a digital citizenship leadership comittee. That's a great idea for me to bring to my administration as our entire middle school is going 1:1 this year. Last year it was just the 8th grade.

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  15. We have a PD team at our school and they are always looking for ideas for staff presentations, I could easily put a PD presentation together to educate them on digital citizenship. I like the idea of a staff reading also, this book would be perfect since it is a quick read and there are so many discussions that could come from it. As for the administrators, I could see working with the technology coordinator as a possible way to bring digital citizenship to their attention.

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    1. I love that you have a PD team! What a powerful way to engage your staff. This would be a great avenue for you to share the highlights of this book.

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  16. I'm still very unsure on this topic. I don't like to speak about things until I feel knowledgeable on them so my first step would be to ask my IT department for more education on the topic. In doing that I will get not only more education myself but that will be spread to staff as well.

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    1. I feel the same way. I didn't feel like I could even answer the question until I spent some time doing more research on some of the websites they have mentioned. I'm hoping I will start to feel more confident once we finish the book.

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  17. After reading this last chapter I’ve realized that my district has followed a lot of these procedures ever since we’ve become a 1:1 school a few years ago. We even have a technology agreement built into our contracts that we’ve reviewed extensively and that touches on personal social media use.

    I think sharing this book would be a good start. I’ve already mentioned this book and our eLearning book club to the teacher in our building that teaches our digital citizenship class. We also participate in what’s called Show and Tell professional development sessions. This might be a good opportunity to provide my co-workers with some relevant information regarding digital citizenship and possibly provide them with quick and easy resources for their students to reference before starting a big research project or engaging in self-publishing online. I’ve found some pretty great videos on YouTube already regarding this subject. Even Ellen has done a segment on her show called “You posted THAT on Facebook?” that touches on this topic in a humorous way:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SCaKuAdKumA&list=PLui3i0IG-_tFy8Ko_R82ThjGHu7pjBMzC

    This video would be a good starting point for discussion regarding social media use and what we choose to post online.

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    1. I really like the 'show and tell' PD idea! I would think doing professional development that way could really benefit a teacher with practical and useful ideas. One of the more memorable PD's I recall my school having last year involved several of my fellow teachers presenting on Google classroom. It was very practically presented. I would think this could be done with digital citizenship as well. The Ellen clip would be a great way to grab everyone's attention!

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  18. I also am going to recommend this book for a local book study. These topics are so relevant in a 1:1 school setting. Our school has had various acceptable use policies that are amended every year. However, I do not think students have had an opportunity to give input. I have a feeling that students would recommend stricter regulations than currently used. I think our corporation is fairly aware of FERPA regulations. Each parent has to sign a document at the beginning of the year regarding use of a students name, image, etc., for public use.

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  19. Now that I have participated in this book study, I feel I would be able to assist my coworkers and administrators in putting ideas together for a comprehensive digital citizenship education program. Maybe for a professional development opportunity and/or maybe for a community involved opportunity.

    Program ideas could include cyber-security. Recognizing phishing email and how to protect themselves from malware. This could also include appropriate social media use. Knowing what is and isn't appropriate. Learning about the FERPA guidelines would be useful to include in the program as well.

    Another way I could possibly be used to help educate my fellow teachers and administrators might be by reviewing the Acceptable Use Policy. Is the language up to date and current? What language could be tweaked? Bringing in the IT department to assist with this would certainly be valuable. Lots can be shared and learned by collaborating with them.

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    1. As our school enters its 5h year of 1:1, reviewing the AUP is a must. We have agreed to allow 4th grade to take their devices home. [Now we allow 4th through 12th grades.] The parents were given an overview and some DC information when they came with their child to pick up and sign the AUP.

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  20. The book has definitely made me ask more questions about educating our students. We do have a big job. I haven't seen our Acceptable Use Policy, seeing the above post makes me want to read this and be aware of this.
    I was also having a discussion with another colleague about the fact that when we use the wifi at school we should also be thinking about the context of our texts, accounts etc. the whole personal vs. classroom use. This book is making me ask questions, which leads to learning. Yay!

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  21. In my current role I can offer short after school classes on digital citizenship. I also have the opportunity to post information about digital citizenship on a school web page that pops up every time staff logs on. The final option is to share the lessons I use with students, with staff members.

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    1. I like the idea of using the website to post some digital citizenship ideas/lessons. Perhaps I will be able to do the same in the future.

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  22. Our 1:1 pilot group had a great conversation about Digital Citizenship today. It is so important that everyone knows the correct vocabulary, which a teacher said today she left like she was lacking. As it was said over and over today, "you don't know what you don't know." It is just so important that we educate our teachers so they know.

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    1. I agree that having shared vocabulary is key, so that teachers and students are all using the same "lingo" and feel like they are on the same page.

      Learning a little at a time is key. Not getting overwhelmed, because there is so much to learn!

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    2. Along those same lines of not knowing what we don't know, it would probably be enlightening to have a trusted student become a resource to inform the faculty "what kids are doing these days" in terms of apps and social media. I know teachers with children of their own may have some insight, but many of us really have no clue.

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    3. Love the idea of same vocabulary -- that should be district wide

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  23. Our school is just now going 1:1 and the chatter about digital citizenship started last year in our students' computer classes. We have added an eLearning coach in each building to help with tech integration. However, our focus as teachers is always on "how do I use this device in the classroom?" and not on what do good digital citizens look like.

    The FIRST inside recess with Chromebooks has the hallway buzzing about what kids should/could/will be doing on their school or personal devices during recess. Here lies digital citizenship. Our staff is now seeing the importance. I have decided to make the suggestion that we add lessons from Common Sense Media to our Second Steps lessons (bullying prevention). Aren't these two similar in some ways? They both teach us how to behave either face-to-face or digitally.

    And, yes, I've Googled myself. I used to worry about my digital footprint, but now I take a proactive approach and make sure I'm creating my footprint not someone else.

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  24. Our school is just now going 1:1 and the chatter about digital citizenship started last year in our students' computer classes. We have added an eLearning coach in each building to help with tech integration. However, our focus as teachers is always on "how do I use this device in the classroom?" and not on what do good digital citizens look like.

    The FIRST inside recess with Chromebooks has the hallway buzzing about what kids should/could/will be doing on their school or personal devices during recess. Here lies digital citizenship. Our staff is now seeing the importance. I have decided to make the suggestion that we add lessons from Common Sense Media to our Second Steps lessons (bullying prevention). Aren't these two similar in some ways? They both teach us how to behave either face-to-face or digitally.

    And, yes, I've Googled myself. I used to worry about my digital footprint, but now I take a proactive approach and make sure I'm creating my footprint not someone else.

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  25. I can help educate my fellow teachers and administrators about digital citizenship by sharing the ideas that I gather from this book club blog. Just getting the conversation started at my school will be the first step.

    There is also an opportunity to share ideas by just modeling. Allowing other teachers to see what I am presenting to students in my class and offering to share that same information/knowledge with them. I can be a resource to fellow teachers that are interested in teaching digital citizenship either a little at a time or all at once.

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  26. As a preschool teacher I shared this book with the owner of the school. I also sent the title to our former district curriculum director...She works very closely with the superintendent of the district that many of our kiddos flow into. I did this in hopes to raise awareness to many others about digital citizenship. As it says in the book, "It takes a village to raise a good digital citizen. The village is the teacher (and parents)...we are wanting to raise good digital citizens...and in order to do so we ourselves need to be educated...and this book is a great start.

    During a faculty meeting at our school...I had all the teachers google our names to see what we would find. Many of us found facebook photos under the google image search engine. We were super surprised! We had thought that because these were private images they stayed private. Which then lead us into a great discussion about what our parents are capable of seeing and being positive we keep a clean and proper image for ourselves and for our school.

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  27. Since I'm not in the classroom this year, I contacted the technology representative for the building and shared this book with her. Our librarian and tech coordinator work closely with each other. They have offered technology/digital citizenship workshops right after school on various topics. This book is a great resource for them as they continue to promote digital citizenship and dialogue.

    As I read the section about student data privacy, I reflected on the frequency of student data analysis but the lack of conversations about third party misuse or parental consent. As teachers use apps and digital tools to help them gather data there is a need for educating teachers on FERPA so they don't "inadvertently violate the law" (p.33).

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  28. I would like to recommend this book as a staff book study for second semester. As our schools are moving toward 1:1, we need to educate ourselves so we can properly model and educate our students and families. I suggested to my principal about offering a workshop at a parent night.
    We have a district-wide anti-bully curriculum for 4th grade that does touch on cyber-bullying. I would like to build the cyber-bully section and teach kids responsible technology use.
    Our district uses an online vendor for staff RUP training, so all staff does receive this at the beginning of the year.

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  29. I plan to share this book with fellow teachers. We also routinely have a show and tell of great teaching ideas. I plan to present an overview of the book and digital citizenship at one of these show and tells.

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    1. Many teachers in my building are participating in this blog. I'm going to suggest that we circulate our books among the teachers and include a discussion at one of our pds.

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  30. First and most important, I believe it is necessary to model good dig cit for my students, staff, and parents. Next--each week in my weekly newsletter I include a "tech tip" for the staff. I can use this forum to give tips on good digital citizenship as well.

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  31. In my role as Media Specialist, I feel that is is my responsibility to "get the ball rolling" in the area of Digital Citizenship. My lessons plans need to consistently incorporate lessons in digital citizenship. I also think it is important to encourage those spur of the moment mini lessons that arise during the school day. As for teachers, I believe it is my job to be a role model for the teachers in my building. I feel the need to begin the discussion in hopes that they will see the importance of digital citizenship and continue those discussions in their classrooms. A fear of mine is that some teachers may think "I don't have time for this, with all the other things I am supposed to cover." What they really need to be thinking is this is an important skill that students need to become life long learners. I would hope that my upper elementary teachers will help the younger grade teachers and be role models of how to incorporate lessons into the classroom. I think many times the younger level teachers may not see the need for digital citizenship because they service young children. The direct opposite thinking needs to take place. We need to really focus on the younger students so that when they get older the foundation of digital citizenship will be strong.

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  32. In my role as a third grade teacher, I plan to share with my fellow teachers and staff. It is very important for our technology specialists to know of it also. One of our professional development days each month is dedicated to technology and this would be a great time to continue conversations about digital citizenship. I also agree that recommending this book as a staff read would have an impact on each of us.

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    1. It is awesome that a PD a month is dedicated to technology. Our school now has once a month during collaboration time dedicated for technology. I could go into grade levels and discuss digital citizenship but it would be much nicer to service everyone at the same time.

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  33. I hope to speak to our administration staff about the issues of digital citizenship and to ask what we, as a school, are doing to education our parents/students. I think it would be a wonderful addition to the freshman orientation program.

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  34. Our schools went 1:1 this year so I would love to share this book with my fellow staff. Since I'm getting back into the schools and am working at the alternative school, I'm out of touch with what they have been doing, especially at the high school, but I would still like to ask and see if they would be interested in reading this book. It's a great book full of information.

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  35. To inform my faculty and staff members, I could work with our administrator on developing a presentation using Power Point or other videos, to educate everyone on digital citizenship. We could pass along all the resources provided in this book, as well as having our very own book study over this book for everyone to be able to collaborate and be on the same page.

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  36. I read a tweet this week about internet blocks. In summary the tweeter questioned why we are willing to trust teachers with the lives and well being of children, but we are not willing to trust them online at various sites. I liked the author's point. There are many times that staff become unwilling to use various technologies online because it is hard and cumbersome to use. I have found professional groups I can glean much information from who are on Twitter. It is not easy to get to Twitter from school. For some of my colleagues, this deters them from trying new things. Communicating these frustrations can at least open dialogue with administration and the tech department and possibly lead to change. Also, sharing where I find new ideas can help pique the interest of colleagues to explore new avenues as well.

    I am a talker. I like to share my finds with the teachers I stand around during passing periods, with my principal various times and with others in my district who are not in the building. That spreads interest as well.

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  37. So far, I have shared this book with the teachers that I work with and two principals. I have discussed what I have learned and how important it is to teach digital citizenship. I'm hoping that I can work with them to put this into our PD plan.

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  38. As an administrator, I am trying to develop book studies with my staff. I want them to be meaningful. I am hoping that this book can go on our list of potential books. I also believe that using the resources from the book, I can drop tips and tricks for my staff to use.

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    1. I'm curious how you balance the importance of professional development along with the need to do this with giving your teachers time to do the book study, participate, plan lessons, grade papers and correspond with parents. Sometimes as a teacher with a 44 minute plan period I feel like there is never enough time in the day.

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  39. As a technology coach, I can think of many opportunities to support learning about digital citizenship. I'd like to encourage the other administrators in my district to become digcit certified. We will soon discuss how to participate in digital citizenship month/week. I'm brainstorming ways to include all students, teachers, and parents in our plans. I'm also thinking that some of our tech-integration learning strand topics can focus on different dig cit topics in the future. I also hope to soon give students an opportunity to lead some of these discussions. Last year, high school students presented to elementary students on digital citizenship during digcit week. Next week, high school students will lead technology camps as part of our 1:1 middle school deployment. I'm looking forward to getting some ideas in the #INeLearn chat tonight, too!

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    1. It was a great exchange last night! Thanks for contributing and I hope you found inspiration too!

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  41. My first step in helping educate my team was to share this book and what I have learned so far. I have also shared many resources I have found and some from the book that I felt had valuable information. But, I still feel I have so much more to learn.
    At our parent information meeting, we shared what digital citizenship is and how important it is that parents monitor what their children are doing at home. Many parents admitted they had no idea what digital citizenship or footprint is. Many were thankful we introduced them to the topic.
    I enjoy reading all the posts and the great ideas and tips everyone is sharing. Thanks all!

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  42. Common Sense Education released their updated PD which introduces their curriculum and teaching digital citizenship. Modules take about an hour to complete. I like how the trainings are broken into grade bands. Once you make your way through the modules, you can take a survey to get a completion certificate. Visit:
    https://www.commonsensemedia.org/educators/training

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  43. Last night was our weekly #INeLearn Twitter Chat and the topic was about preparing for Indiana's Digital Citizenship Week. Thanks to the book club members who turned out and exchanged ideas! If you missed it, here is an archived record of the conversation.
    https://storify.com/INeLearn/inelearn-chat-8-18-16

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  44. I have shared this book with some of my peers in my school and plan to share it with my administrators to hopefully start a more open dialogue with our staff. We have staff members at both ends of the spectrum when it comes to this topic and their level of comfort with understanding digital citizenship, so I think it's most important to just start the conversation.

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  45. I will continue to share the information I learn with my colleagues. My school does a great job reminding teachers to discuss digital citizenship and offers way for teachers to learn about it as well. Just continuing to share the things I learn and reminding others that it is a topic to be talked about all through the year.

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  46. The best way I have found to discuss digital citizenship with my peers is in the lunchroom. It is a low stress environment where people are most likely to be open and share information. All of us have had questions about FERPA and privacy laws. Can I put a picture of abc on the school facebook page? How do I know if the student's parents checked the box about no pictures. Questions like these often come up and it is a great place to open up the digital citizenship discussion. By the way, I love the idea of calling the school plans RUP's. That puts the ownership on the user.

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  47. My school is not well educated on digital usage at all. I find it difficult to have the time and resources to becoming more informed myself. We had an educational seminar this past summer which was helpful but not enough. I already find myself commenting when something is said or done which I know now is inappropriate. I plan to attend our tech Tuesday meetings which will increase my knowledge and I believe will help me also get more involved in the whole technology environment at my school. I really wish I had more time to get into and learn more and faster about technology use and citizenship because really that is the best way to become knowledgeable.

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  48. I have learned a lot from this book and have shared some of what I've learned with my grade level. This year I'm hoping to learn more from my own research, the teachers in my building, and our school's media specialist. While I do not feel like enough of an expert to educate the faculty in my building about digital citizenship, I at least feel like I'm on the right path.

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  49. It’s important to find ways to be the conversation starter about the topics of these chapters. Find natural opportunities in lunchroom conversations to bring up a conversation about personal feelings on social media presence and interactions or other related topics. Even veteran teachers might not have had need to think through the ideas from this book. Recently I advised a teacher about usage of copyrighted material a random user uploaded on Youtube. Your fellow teachers and administrators likely have the same questions you had before you even cracked this book open.

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  50. As a high school teacher, I think the best way to help other educators learn about digital citizenship is by simply starting a conversation. We have collaboration once a week, usually with our departments, and sometimes with the entire staff. I think this would be a great time to share what I've learned from the book, and share with others how we can be the models of digital citizenship for our students. With going 1:1, we have been talking about technology, its purpose in the classroom, and digital citizenship in these collaborations, so I think simply sharing the information from this book, especially about copy right, will be an added resource to the school.

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  51. As a high school teacher, I think the best way to help other educators learn about digital citizenship is by simply starting a conversation. We have collaboration once a week, usually with our departments, and sometimes with the entire staff. I think this would be a great time to share what I've learned from the book, and share with others how we can be the models of digital citizenship for our students. With going 1:1, we have been talking about technology, its purpose in the classroom, and digital citizenship in these collaborations, so I think simply sharing the information from this book, especially about copy right, will be an added resource to the school.

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  52. I have to agree with those who have said that the best way to help and encourage other educators is by simply starting a conversation. By introducing the topic in a more easy mannered way, I think those who are not as comfortable with the concept of digital citizenship will be more open to learning more. Many of us don't like when we get told we have to do something, and feel that we are being told how to teach, losing our sense of control over the content. By us sharing in a less formal manner, we can get more buy-in and less resistance sometimes.

    As part of the conversations, I would also want to share this book with colleagues and administrators, so that they understand the concepts more in-depth. I would love to see the school use the book club approach, just like we are doing in this blog/on-line book club, to get people thinking about implementation so that they can have these conversations.

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  53. This book would be a great book study with the entire staff. It could be something where a chapter is read a week, like we are doing, and ideas are shared during collaboration. This could be a great way to get the conversations started and ideas rolling on how to get everyone involved in digital citizenship. I also like the idea others are mentioning about sending out weekly/biweekly digital citizenship practices through email that could be applied to the classroom. This could be an easy and quick way to get the staff thinking about digital citizenship and how to properly apply it in the school.

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  54. First, I need to learn more about digital citizenship myself. How else can I model it and answer others’ questions? I have my own questions to ask, too, and little by little I am learning and gaining experience. After reading so many posts, I was compelled to Google myself, and was surprised how many people with my same name there are! But I was also surprised to find how much information is available. I felt like if I dug deeply enough, I could find records of which teeth I had pulled when I was 12. I agree with page 29 where it says, “an uneducated workforce creates serious security risks.” It’s good to be aware that we all have a cyber-footprint.

    I want to participate in conversations about how to stay safe out there in cyberland. I think that questions like this should be addressed before a school’s roll-out of 1:1. As I’ve read through responses, I have found that in various schools technology is given out before any dig. cit. training. How can we send people out to drive a car without first learning the rules of the road, and then saying, oh, learn it while you drive, and oh, your “driving instructor” isn’t sure of the rules yet, but she’s learning. We all need the proper training, and of course it should be ongoing training. I am also intrigued with having the school community involved in writing the acceptable use policy.

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  55. I think a good place to start in helping others is to also educate myself, and inviting a speaker to discuss cyber security issues would be a good springboard. We have great tech support in the corporation that I work for; scheduling a professional development opportunity would ensure that, in our pursuit to become more tech savvy, we do not endanger ourselves or others.

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  56. In my district's beginning of the school year meeting, we were reminded about what message we may be sending about our school and ourselves. I thought this served as a great reflection about digital citizenship. Simple reminders go a long way throughout the whole school year. I find that it is best not to bombard teachers and students with too much at once but to build on these messages gradually. People are more apt to remembering this too if it is done slowly.

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    1. I totally agree with the reminders. It is just like we say that the kids need repetition, so do we, as adults.

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  57. I feel like most of the teachers in my division "get it." We have had meetings where we discuss things including to not get on facebook and posting during school hours, etc. I think that is common sense. But many people post their political views and that can get them into trouble. Helping them understand this is I see myself helping to educate the others.

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  58. It is an ongoing education for everyone. It needs to be spread throughout the school year and communicated with best practices. Many people just do not realize that they are modeling bad digital citizenship and it all comes to education and mindful practices.

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  59. I am currently the English Department Chair at my high school, so the copyright/fair use issues are critical for me and the teachers in my department to understand. I think we, as a department, could do a lot in educating the rest of the faculty about these issues. We have received poor guidance and little to no instruction as employees about this issue. When our school went 1:1, English teachers had a lot of questions about copyright issues since we were teaching without a textbook for the first time. Many times we were told, "If it's on the Internet, it's fair game." A few English teachers knew this was not right. A session on copyright issues was included in a summer WISE conference in our district, but attendance was purely voluntary. A couple of us went to this session and left more confused than ever and slightly scared we were violating copyright laws despite our caution. I know a little bit, but I am also smart enough to know this is an area in which I need to learn more. I can express this to my principal, curriculum director, and superintendent in hopes our faculty will become more aware ourselves so we can properly instruct our students as well. Our faculty also needs to be made aware of FERPA. The special education teachers and teachers that are also parents of college students are probably the only ones who are aware of what this acronym stands for and what it means.

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    1. Teaching elementary students the meaning of copyright is difficult. The concept of "ownership" of something non-tangible is not easily understood. Our library aide does a great job of teaching the kids how to cite their research. So, I think we start there.

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  60. I think we could better incorporate digital citizenship into our school. We have a suspended curriculum for the first week of school and we spend one class period on digital citizenship, but I think it's something that we need to more digiligently include and much more frequently. We have an "advisory" type of people where we are going to focus on character once a week, and I'm going to suggest that we incorporate digital citizenship at this time.

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  61. I have always recognized the importance of teaching Digital Citizenship at all grade levels and as I have been reading this book and reading all the posts here in the blog, I am really trying to figure out how best to do more than I am already doing. As the LIbrary Media Specialist, I made myself familiar with all of my teachers and their curriculum and special interests. While I participate in many personal learning networks, I pay attention to all topics and whenever I see something that of interest to my teachers, I share a FYI email. Sometimes I send a blanket email to the entire corporation, other times, I send the resource to a specific teacher. I have started looking for resources that I can share with my teachers pertaining to Digital Citizenship.

    I have been speaking with my middle school teachers about the possibility of a library/enrichment class collaboration focusing on digital citizenship using the Common Sense Media resources. We are still in the planning stage, but hope to implement something this semester.

    I would love to plan something for Digital Citizenship week, but will probably have to wait until next year to make this happen. In the meantime, I have plans for the students for that week. (more on this in next week's post).

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  62. I'm the library/media specialist in my building. I try to model for teachers and students using good digital citizenship skills on social media and in my lessons.

    I could try to come up with mini lessons/activities to tack onto staff meetings next year. I also thought about coming up with some that could be done during SLT (like a guided study hall) that would be good for both teaches and students to learn from. I'd like to see us come up with more of a plan not just as a school but also as a district for digital citizenship and becoming certified next school year.

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  63. As a 4th grade teacher I can learn as much as I can about Digital Citizenship and share it with collegues and my district. If we have school professional development sessions within our employees I can try to help share what I have learned.

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  64. Sharing this book with fellow teachers and our principal will be the place for me to start. I feel I still have more to learn about this topic, but doing a book study over this book is a good place to start. We are not a 1:1 school, but it is important, in my opinion, to educate everyone now about digital citizenship so all stakeholders will be aware before we do go 1:1 in the future.

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  65. In the role you are in at your school or district, how can you help educate your fellow teachers and administrators about digital citizenship?

    Since I work with many schools I feel I could support schools through stressing the importance but also modeling for them and sharing stories of success with them. I would also like to provide resources for them to share with their staff and make digital citizenship a priority and for schools/teachers to be proactive with educating others about being responsible and using technology appropriately. That might relieve some of the fear that teachers have when incorporating technology into their lessons.

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  66. When I googled myself, I discovered I have a fairly common name, and I had to look pretty hard to find the right "me." My accomplishment of publishing my own e-Book was pretty hard to find, but that was about the only thing I was able to find about me. I guess I'm not to news-worthy. As far as following up on educating my fellow teachers about digital citizenship, I am trying to bring it up when we discuss the usual "citizenship" we expect our students to follow behaviorally. I have discussed with other teachers that digital citizenship is not something we have been trained in, just as the book mentions, but that we all need to become aware of so we can begin instilling it in the students. My middle school is about to go 1:1, and this book is just perfect for the faculty who wish to learn more about digital citizenship.

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    1. I would love to share this book with my fellow teachers in my building and have a book study. I just wish this eLearning was at the beginning of the summer instead of when school has started.

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  67. edit: I guess I'm not TOO news-worthy

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  68. My first step is to make sure the administration and staff are aware of digital citizenship. Most of us are scared we are going to get trouble with the higher-ups if we delve into this social media. This book is reassuring that it is okay as long as we take the right precautions and we take the time to teach the correct protocol. The more we get used to the correct digital citizenship, the more of a norm it becomes.

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    1. I agree. I think fear has played a big role in our "playing it safe" when it comes to bringing more technology into our classrooms. I, myself, would love to have some clear guidelines to follow.

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    2. I agree. I think fear has played a big role in our "playing it safe" when it comes to bringing more technology into our classrooms. I, myself, would love to have some clear guidelines to follow.

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  69. Since reading the book I have discussed Digital Citizenship with my principal. When I attended the technology conference in Richmond Indiana I attended a session on Digital Citizenship. They shared some low and free websites for the staff and students to learn and practice safety procedures on the computer.

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  70. Working in a virtual educational setting I am hyper sensitive as to what I and my students can/can not post, view, share, etc. Sadly, I can say that I have had zero training in the area of cyber protection. I have many questions and this chapter has opened up the door to more and resurfaced some of those old questions that I have had. I will be sending an email tomorrow to my department head to get some answers and to see if there is a formal training/program provided by our school.

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  71. Working in a virtual educational setting I am hyper sensitive as to what I and my students can/can not post, view, share, etc. Sadly, I can say that I have had zero training in the area of cyber protection. I have many questions and this chapter has opened up the door to more and resurfaced some of those old questions that I have had. I will be sending an email tomorrow to my department head to get some answers and to see if there is a formal training/program provided by our school.

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  72. I have had conversations with the new principal and IT specialists about my interest in digital citizenship. This eRead opportunity was the first step in educating myself. Digital Citizenship is not a topic of discussion at our school. I hope to be a part of the change process. I like many of the ideas suggested here. I am also realizing the change of behavior I need to make regarding the topics in this chapter.

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  73. I plan on talking to my administrators about this book and see if we can use it at one of our book clubs. I think it is a great resource for good digital citizenship. I think this book would be great for all our staff to become better educated on the subject, but even the members of the book club would get relevant information out of it.

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  74. My school has done a great job of educating students on digital citizenship as part of their library curriculum, but I believe it needs to be integrated in everyday classroom lessons as well. I think one great place to start with educating others is by having a book club utilizing this book. That will allow teachers to collaborate on ways to educate themselves, their students, and their parents. I too believe that many teachers are hesitant to use social media as a teaching tool. If it were to be something that teachers tackled together, I believe that more would be willing to learn about using social media as a teaching tool.
    I also liked the section in chapter 4 about copyright and fair use. I really haven't given this much thought beyond not copying something that is from a book unless permission is granted. I would love to learn more about copyright and fair use in the context of the digital world. This would make me feel more confident in teaching students about this topic.

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  75. We use computers often at our school so the issue of digital citizenship is consistently addressed along with fair use and copyright issues. As an English teacher, I make a specific point of this idea in connection to plagiarism and how to avoid it. The conversation has just expanded to include digital media along with items from print sources.

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  76. I have a PD shelf in the school library. I have already ordered some copies to add to the shelf, and I will have it as a highlight of my Digital Citizenship Week display. Do any of you have fun suggestions for a high school display for Digital Citizenship Week?

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  77. I have always believed that you lead by example. This would also include digital citizenship. I use different video clips and other media in most of the classes I teach, so understanding and abiding by Fair Use and Copyright laws are very important. Also, making sure that students are complying with technology policies that our school corporation has established will help ensure that we have a safe and productive digital footprint.

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