Monday, August 8, 2016

Digital Citizenship Week 3: Demonstrating Leadership

This week we are reading and discussing chapter 3, "Demonstrating Leadership." Considering the seven steps Susan discussed in this chapter, how will you start the school year educating yourself about digital citizenship or modeling good digital citizenship?

Thank you for being such great book club participants! The discussions have been rich and hopefully you all are benefitting from them. Continue to support each other in the discussions, ask questions, and share your thoughts and ideas. If you have not joined the Digital Citizenship Communities of Practice, that is a great place to continue this conversation. Also, visit our website to learn more about Indiana's digital citizenship initiatives.

For next week we will read chapter 4, "Educating Faculty and Staff."

154 comments:

  1. I learned about Digital Citizenship by attending a workshop on Digital Citizenship one day this summer, and when I saw this eLearning Book Club, I had to participate! I want to be as good of a resource for my students as I can. I think that the best way to do this is to learn as much as I can! So, I am following the seven steps that Susan has outlined in chapter 3. My plan is to start the school year with a discussion of what is Digital Citizenship? To get a feel for where my students are in their understanding of what it take to be a good digital citizen when they are online. I'm also planning to have my students Google themselves, just so that they can see what is already out on the Internet about themselves.
    I understand that this is a lesson that will run the course of the school year. I am looking forward to watching my students grow as Digital Citizens this year!

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    1. Your plan to have your students google themselves sounds like a good idea! I might do it also.

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    2. I love that idea of googling yourself! Not sure how this would pan out for me in the younger grades but I defiantly think it is important to relate digital citizenship to being a good citizen (having them give examples and then transferring those ideas to how it looks either the use of technology.) I also think helpful reminders and consistency throughout the school year and from each grade is important.

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  3. This may be one of my favorite chapters in the book! Steps 2, 3, 6, & 7 can't happen without first taking step 1-educate yourself. ISTE has "standards" that help define what digital citizenship looks like for both educators and students (even admin now that I think of it). The teacher standards are currently being updated (and you can be a part of that process if you're interested). The student standards were just released after a refresh last year. You can find them online at http://www.iste.org/standards/standards/for-students-2016
    but here's the DigCit specific indicators for students as Digital Citizens:
    A. Students cultivate and manage their digital identity and reputation and are aware of the permanence of their actions in the digital world.
    B. Students engage in positive, safe, legal and ethical behavior when using technology, including social interactions online or when using networked devices.
    C. Students demonstrate an understanding of and respect for the rights and obligations of using and sharing intellectual property.
    D. Students manage their personal data to maintain digital privacy and security and are aware of data-collection technology used to track their navigation online.

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    1. I love this! To be honest I didn't know either about the standards. It is helpful to start using this with the preschool level to educate parents prior to their little ones stepping foot into an elementary school!

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    2. This is great! I did not know about the standards. What a great resource. Thank you!

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    3. Michelle, Thank you for your continued sharing of practical resources to help us be successful in promoting effective digital citizenship!

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    4. It's great that you shared the standards! Thanks!

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    5. Thank you for sharing this about the standards. This will help guide me with how I model and teach Digital Citizenship. I am excited to incorporate Digital Citizenship into my lessons beginning with a complete unit in 6th grade and then add it to my curriculum where I can in 7th and 8th. I need to continue to educate myself! I want all my students to be aware of their digital footprint!

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    6. Starting early with these standards is the key. Then when students get into middle and high school their behaviors will be positive, rather than negative when going online.

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    7. This is a great resource to help us guide our students towards positive digital citizenship. The new 2016 Indiana Science Standards also have a strand for digital citizenship - Impact and Culture. I plan to work on developing lessons for these standards this year.

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    8. The school corporation I work for talked to us about the standards at the end of last year. We were also given a hard copy of them. We are expected to implement them this year.

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    9. This is great! This is so important to start early. I think I have had the "old-fashioned" view that my students (K, age 5/6) don't need to be concerned with digital citizenship but I am wrong. They are more apt to be on technology and need to know the basics of security and safety!

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    10. The EVSC implemented a Digitsl Citizenship program last year. The Technology team st Reitz worked with the TeenPower group to create an action plan and carry it out. Seeing the seven standards now, I can already start planning how to rework our plan for this year.

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    11. Michelle, thank you for taking the time to type out the student standards for Digital Citizenship. As an English teacher, I'm vaguely aware of Standard C, but I need to become more familiar with copyright issues. When we first got computers, there was a workshop offered at our summer professional development session, but it wasn't specific enough for English teachers. We need more instruction and information in this area1

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    12. Thank you for printing the standards. All teachers should be aware of these standards and I am afraid many do not.

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  4. Thank you for sharing the website for the student standards! I hate to admit that I did not know about this site or standard. The information you provided will help educate me with Digital Citizenship Standard.

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  6. Well for me the first step involved a conversation with a friend who works in a different district and was sharing information that she had learned in a recent professional development she attended this summer on Digital Citizenship. Then when she learned of this elearning book club we both decided to join. Joining this discussion and reading the book were a good start I think. Additionally I have chosen to participate in a technology boot camp this week offered by my district. Taking these couple steps leads into number 2 on modeling good citizenship. I have joined a professional site and I did googled myself. Steps 3,4,5,6 & 7 will be easy to start addressing during staff meetings and during lunch conversations.

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    1. Your technology boot camp sounds like a great addition to this book club!

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    2. I encourage you to join the Digital Citizenship Community http://bit.ly/DigCitCommunity so that you can collaborate beyond the book club. I will share a Google Yourself lesson plan there for others who are interested.

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    3. Michelle, I am interested in the Google Yourself lesson plan. What info do you need for me to get it?
      Thanks in advance!

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    4. Hi Laura, all you have to do is join the Indiana Digital Citizenship Community, I posted it in there. I'm hoping others will also share their favorite lessons/resources too. Go to http://bit.ly/DigCitCommunity It will ask you to Join the community. You will see the post on the stream or by clicking on General Resources.

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    5. Thank you for this information Michelle!

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  7. I enjoyed reading this chapter. I found myself thinking about number 6. Don't expect a positive digital citizenship culture to happen in a vacuum. I reflected on how long it takes for an individual classroom, gradelevel, or school to get on the same page with behavioral expectations in general and how this directly applies to digital citizenship. As a school we dedicated many hours to developing a positive culture and it will take many hours to establish a positive digital culture. We spent collaboration meetings learning about CLASS as a staff. It would be helpful to use collaboration time to build a common understanding of digital expectations.

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    1. You bring up an excellent point and that is to be patient. Digital citizenship needs to be established, but with time. It can be overwhelming to think about all that would need to be covered, so if it is something we address regularly and frequently throughout the school year it can be accomplished!

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    2. I like your idea of incorporating the discussion of digital citizenship into collaboration meetings! As we know, setting up school wide expectations for Digital Citizenship will take time. But, with collaboration, hopefully others will be able to contribute and have ownership in developing the schools expectations!

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    3. Sarah. Heather, and Tereasa, I enjoy seeing where your conversation is going! Ownership is essential in building a culture of positive digital citizenship. If you haven't already seen the plans for a state digcit week, I invite you to check them out and share them with your leadership team http://www.doe.in.gov/digcitweek

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    4. It absolutely has to be a culture change, I think, especially in schools that are in a 1:1 environment. Everyone in the building interacting with students using devices needs to be practicing and modeling digital citizenship!

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  8. Before I can effectively be a better digital leader in my school and for my students, I need to educate myself. A great start would be to further familiarize myself with the websites that the book has suggested. Having a solid understanding of the web tools my school corporation wants or does not want teachers to use would be a good thing as well.

    We currently use Google Classroom as our LMS and that would be a great place to include examples of good digital citizenship for both parents and students to look at. Sharing information from Common Sense Education could be something I could use. Finding video clips for both the parent and child to look at could be useful as well. Since I know both student and parent are frequently looking at Google Classroom, that could be a great resource I could tap into for sharing information on digital citizenship.

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    1. I like the idea of using Google Classroom as a way to involve the parents.

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    2. We are just now opening up Google Classroom. I really want to use it and am feeling a little overwhelmed. Do you have any suggestions. I like too that you can include parents in the discussion. This is something I really need to explore.

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  9. I my earlier post, I do not feel that addressed the seven steps for Digital Citizenship.
    Step 1: I began my learning of Digital Citizenship with a professional training earlier this summer. Next, by joining this eLearning book club and reading the book.
    Step 2: With the knowledge I have gained this summer, I will model good digital citizenship for my students.
    Steps: 3 through 7: Can only happen after the first two steps have taken place.

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  10. I do believe I need to spend a good amount of time on step #1. This year I will be teaching all freshmen so I think I will need to help train them to be responsible citizens with their Ipads. This will allow me to learn along with them. Also, I have been working on step #2 for a while now. I participated in the book group last summer that focused on using Twitter, but my PLN has been pretty slow to grow. I think my number one challenge is to convince myself that my own personal avoidance of social media does nothing to teach my students about how to use it responsibly. I have yet to meet a student who avoids social media! The timing of this summer book study is great because it will force me to actually think about these ideas once the school year has already started! I can use steps 3-7 immediately on my students and colleagues!

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  11. I think that with younger children my focus needs to be more on educating parents about digital citizenship after I educate myself more. This book is very helpful to me and researching more will be helpful too!

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  12. Since the beginning of our school year is nearly here, I'm hoping to educate myself further this week using the companion website that is referred to in the book. I'd like to be more knowledgeable about digital citizenship before I really start to dive into working on Chrome books with my students. I'd also like to start a conversation about digital citizenship with my grade level team during one of our teacher work days and see if that may be one of the things we'd like to discuss with parents at our back-to-school night.

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    1. I think that is a great way to start! I am in the same situation, just really need to get a good understanding of digital citizenship before rolling it out to staff, students and parents.

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    2. Kelly, you are on to something! We do need to involve all stakeholders! Here's a link to some basic lessons that we have selected for IN DigCit Week (Sept 12-16) that you might want to look at with your team. They are a great starting place and we included family resources as well. In fact, this is only one part of the DigCitWeek Toolkit: http://www.doe.in.gov/elearning/digital-citizenship/plan-digcit-week

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  13. In order to educate myself about digital citizenship this school year, I will be attending a digital citizenship conference and continue to read about it. During the school year I will address digital citizenship with my students through mini lessons throughout the year.
    I plan to pass on what I have learned about digital citizenship with staff after attending the conference. I would also like to educate parents about digital citizenship during our parent nights throughout the school year.

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  14. At the start of every year I introduce the parents of my class to my class blog. The blog is updated every week and the parents are encouraged to check it with their child and ask them questions about the week. Now...I teach 3 year olds. So I find it challenging to teach digital footprints to these little guys...however, I can help make parents aware. I love the "Most people don't know what they don't know." That is so true. Parents would have no idea what I was posting about their kiddo if they don't check. Which leads to the importance of me following #2...Model Good Digital Citizenship.

    Our school allows us to access Youtube and show kiddos small "snip-its" or educational clips to the kiddos. What we often found was prior to viewing these clips there was an inappropriate ad that was present before. We then did research to find that there is a kids youtube app...and this prevented those dreadful ads to 3 year olds. Without us educating ourselves we would not have been able to learn of this new and wonderful app.

    As I have been teaching this level for 4 years now...I began thinking about ways that I could use another form of social media incorporating parents. Maybe a private facebook page that could be updated each day. And spark parent discussion. I know that if I don't try something new I will become stuck in the same old thing...doing nothing new and not learning about other way to involve my parents.

    Now having a school aged child (he is in 1st grade) I wonder how his school will involve parents and educate us...as well as him. I haven't heard of anything going on other than reading on-line books. Maybe...I could be the encourager to activate/spark some community digital citizenship.

    Any ideas on how to further add some social media involving parents and kiddos at the age of 3?? I would love some feedback!

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    1. I also found YouTube to have the most inappropriate ads with kid videos. I also use the kid YouTube app and this would be something important to talk to parents about using. I am using class dojo this year in my classroom where you can post pictures and give information to parents about what is going on in the classroom. You can also send private messages to individual parents. What you put on the app is only seen by parents and you. I think this app will be good for communicating with parents.

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    2. I have a good friend who is a kindergarten teacher who uses a simple blog. Many of her students' parents rely on their phones for internet access, so a short blog with maybe one picture is easy for them to access. (I would post a link, but she's between schools and they haven't started this year yet)

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    3. Mrs. Laura, what a great example of educating yourself and not excluding technology out of fear. Not all technology is intended for school settings, but there are things we can do to use good resources. There are many extensions like you discovered that remove ads and sidebars from website including YouTube.

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    4. I love the idea of sparking parent conversation. I have an only child, so I'm always eager to see how other parents are handling digital media with their kids. A private Facebook page is a great idea!

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    5. Not just YouTube. When my students search on Google and choose "images," inappropriate images are sprinkled throughout. I use this as an opportunity to discuss making good choices even when faced with temptation.

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  17. I find myself wanting to rush through all seven steps and do everything right now. I think it's that beginning of the school year mindset!

    I need to slow down and really think about the vision for my class and what I want them to know as fourth graders. This requires me to really take step one of learning more about digital citizenship seriously. I'm going to take some time on the websites they mentioned in this chapter. I think Nearpod also has some lessons that they made with Common Sense Media, so I'm going to look more closely at those.

    As far as modeling good digital citizenship, I'm making a commitment to stop using any image online without regard to copyright or fair use laws. This brings me back to needing a little more information. I better check out that companion site!

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    1. You are a rockstar, Meghann! Thank you for being committed to modeling one of the biggest contradictions are students face in schools! We cannot teach them copyright and fair use when the adults around them are not respectful of the rules. This Symbaloo webmix has several options for finding (or creating) fair use images http://edu.symbaloo.com/mix/freeandfairuseimages

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    2. Ugh! If only Blogger would let us edit our comments! Our students not "are."

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    4. Thank you! This we mix is great, especially since the google image options for Creative Commons remove almost all images.

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  18. I plan to start the school year by modeling good digital citizenship and share with students my Twitter handle @farandlow and the hashtag #last14daysofsummer which will show them a bit of my personality as I plan to start the year as strong as I finished these last two weeks of summer. At this point I am not sure if students or I can access Twitter at school due to filters. However, I post some class activities from time to time, and I want students to know I wish to share with others their positive contributions to our classroom and school.

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  19. My goals this year for digital citizenship are to model being a good digital citizen, involve my students in Common Sense Media lessons, have students work with other students using our classroom Twitter account, and continue to search for professional growth opportunities. Our school recently had a book study on technology education for parents. I think it would be great for me to share tidbits of information with parents in my weekly newsletter. In committing to sharing tidbits of information, I will be more apt to continue learning about digital citizenship myself.

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    1. Ashley, could you share what book was used?

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    2. Yes, ditto, please share the title of the book you studied.

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    4. Tech-Savvy Parenting: Navigating Your Child's Digital Life by: Brian Housman

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    5. Tech-Savvy Parenting: Navigating Your Child's Digital Life by: Brian Housman

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    6. A little late, but here's the book! Great read for parents and educators.

      https://www.amazon.com/Tech-Savvy-Parenting-Navigating-Digital-ebook/dp/B00L9B79OO/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1471317464&sr=8-1&keywords=tech+parenting

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  20. #4 and #7 especially resonated with me; I think integrating digital citizenship into as many classes as possible is one of the best plans. Last year we used many facets of the Common Sense Media program during media visits, but that will be decreased this year. It is important to educate our teachers so that they incorporate good practice into their assignments and instruction. This is where I can take a leadership role and offer to work more with staff. During the visits to the media center, largely the language arts teachers were involved. Working through teams of teachers, departments, or some other group that will collaborate and plan might help them incorporate some good digital citizenship practices.

    I have become more cognizant of trying to model good citizenship. Instead of randomly pulling photos and clipart off the net, I am trying to create more of my own. One of the first things I look at for a webtool is the terms of service/age requirement. A popular lesson I shared last year with all grades was demonstrating/having students use the usage rights for google images (not easy to find). Students were amazed by the number of images that disappeared in certain categories, and the variety of tools you could use to search.

    Finally, I am demonstrating some of these points by arranging for a speaker from the State Police to come to our parent open house this Thursday. She will speak on internet safety/cyberbullying. We are making the program available to both students and parents.

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    1. I, too, find the Google image search tools quite disappointing. Many of the images that do NOT appear in the list would probably be OK to use IF the owner of the image had stated that it was OK to use the image. However, if it isn't explicitly stated that the image is in the creative commons, it shouldn't be used. Most people aren't aware of this. Good thoughts, Susie.

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  21. Copy writing is something I take very serious with my students, but never realized all those little clip arts I use is the same thing. I have to be more conscious of this since I am setting an example as I model good digital citizenship. That will be one of my goals for this year for sure.

    I also want to get parents more involved than I have in past years. After all, almost all of them have smart phones. I was wondering though if it would be better to make an electronic newsletter or a take home paper newsletter? Any thoughts?

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  22. I began Step one by joining this book study after I had to miss a staff development session that my district offered this summer. With our school going 1:1 this year I know it is very important to educate myself about Digital Citizenship as much as possible before the school year starts and the students are working with IPads. Step 2 I started a class Twitter and Instagram last year to communicate things that were happening in our classroom at the end of last school year. I also use the Remind app to communicate with parents. This year I am setting up a Google Classroom. I need to research other apps/websites to join to continue my professional learning Network. The rest of the steps myself and my staff will work together to figure out together. I hope to have more inservices/workshops on this topic because it is very important going into the future of education.

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  23. I am very interested in exploring The Common Sense Education site to begin gathering materias to teach within the classroom. It is critical at the middle school level to incorporate digital citizenship as students are beginning to rely more and more on social media and messaging during this phase of life.
    It would be beneficial to our staff of we begin sharing lessons with one another on digital citizenship. As the year gets settled, I would like to explore how to most effectively share some of the ideas that the book discussed in step 4, such as having the counselor share effective ways to handle cyber bullying.
    Finally, I am going to set up, and share with my students, ways to monitor my own digital footprint.
    At times it is hard to teach students digital citizenship when they see so much negative modeling on a daily basis. I want to be more proactive with teaching my students, and our community more about digital citizenship.

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    1. I also teach at the middle school level and agree with your statements about their reliance on social media. Quite often students are consumed with the drama that occurs online. I would love to see the school counselors do a presentation on how react to the negativity online.

      I plan on doing my own lesson on this also. Students will be paired up and given a situation that may occur. For example what to do if you see a cyberbully posting inappropriate comments on your friend's Twitter. They will have to list 2 ways to appropriately handle the obstacle and present their best idea to the class. I am hoping that by incorporating this in the classroom, it will help students reflect on appropriate responses before they post online. People (kids and adults alike) feel too comfortable typing their initial thoughts without considering proper social media etiquette.

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  24. One thing that I am committing to this year is learning more about educational uses for social media. I'd also like to incorporate more digital citizenship into all my classes. It's easy in some subject areas but harder in others. Those are the areas I really need to concentrate on this year so that students see everything as an integrated whole.

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  25. I am interested in doing my part in helping younger students realize early that they are creating their own digital footprint in the world. I think that they need to realize what they do is always being witnessed by someone. This could be on the internet or in person. The story about the younger children about being a poopy head is a great example, but very serious. My administrator and I were talking about how the students can learn in a safe environment such as the classroom with a small mistake such as the name calling one time and not make a big mistake later out in the world to learn the same lesson. We as adults are charged with raising and helping our children with these lessons; the question I want to think about is how? As a community role modeling etc. let them make these mistakes, but mistakes that they will not forever be on their digital footprint.

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  26. I really liked the practical ideas in this chapter about how to monitor and create your own digital footprint. I loved the quote, "If you don't tell your story, someone else will tell it for you." I am going to try to jump Twitter to practice role modeling appropriate digital citizenship. I also liked the ideas of calling the Technology policies Responsible Use instead of Acceptable Use. This rephrasing puts the ownership on the student/user.

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    1. I, too, like the rephrase "Responsible Use" because it does put the student in an ownership position. I have shared with my students that when they make a decision, they need to "own it" and make sure they want to "own it" before they follow through (do it).

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    2. Love the idea of "Responsible Use" as well. Thank you for bringing that up.

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  27. When our Media Specialist introduced the kids to digital citizenship last school year, I began to research the topic. There are many good sites out there that lead a teacher through the steps of covering digital citizenship in the classroom. I teach 5th grade, and our team began reinforcing what the kids learned during computer time. Nancy Batliner, our Media Specilist, printed each teacher a set of poster for us to post in our rooms to remind students of their responsibilities when on the computer. We quickly go over the "rules" before we use our chrome books.
    The seven steps that are covered in the book are great. I especially like steps 4 and 5. Never assume awareness and monitor yourself. I also appreciate that everyone is sharing other resources to help us become knowledgeable and will help us share our knowledge with students, parents, and peers.

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  28. My first step to promoting digital citizenship was signing up for the book club. This book club has been especially helpful in providing ideas and resources to make this successful in a systematic approach. I will be discussing digital citizenship with my students starting on day one. One of the stations the students will be working on is what they think digital citizenship means to them and having an evolving discussion throughout the year from there. My goal coming into this book club revolved around #7 in providing more authentic learning experiences online with the students this year and each experience needing to have a discussion about the importance of #digcit. In all honesty, as a result of these book club discussion, I now see the biggest concentration for me this year in building on my weakest area and that is modeling and teaching the principles of copyright.

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  29. I feel that I have already started educating myself more in digital citizenship the past few weeks. As it has been stated by many of you, (and in the chapter itself) reading this book was my first big dive into educating myself. I have been to 2 different workshops that have not only taught me about topics I was unfamiliar with, but also to help be a good role model for my students and staff members as well. Last week, I attended a coding workshop that can educate students ranging from Kindergarten all the way through high school. I still have a lot to learn in the area. I also attended a workshop that discussed to many ways smart phones, and devices can be used as a positive tool in the classroom when the resources are introduced to students and staff. I would like to become more educated in Edmodo, and other safe environments that would be a communication tool for students. At times, we run into issues through our IT department with blocking certain websites, so that would be another barrier to cross. In my daily life, I can model good digital citizenship by always showing students and staff the positive ways technology can help in both our school lives and our personal lives. Showing students that their digital footprint is planted almost permanently, is a must for the sake of their future and safety.

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  30. I first heard of digital citizenship last school year from a fellow high school librarian. I researched it some more at the Common Sense Media website and found some really good lesson plans on teaching different aspects of digital citizenship. As I have classes in the library this year, I plan to incorporate some of those lesson plans (last year was too overwhelming). I plan to talk more about it with students and teachers. I have heard it mentioned in passing at a couple of staff meetings, so tracking down the teachers and discussing what they know is a good place to start. This is something I would like to become knowledgeable on and share it via a professional development day at our high school. I admit I have a long way to go since I do not use any social media like twitter or facebook (I'm not even sure of others), but I like the author's suggestion for #2 - model good citizenship and pick a platform and model how to make positive posts.
    I also need to change my thinking that being a good digital citizen is only related to social media, it's not...there are other things to keep in mind such as copyright issues and using other's creative work, protecting your online data and privacy, free speech vs. hate speech.

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  31. There are so many things I liked about this chapter. While speaking on Digital Citizenship, the biggest thing I tell teachers is that students will NEVER learning about #DigCit if it is taught in an isolated single lesson once per month. Just like any other skill, it needs to be embedded into all aspects of life if it is to be truly learned. Step #7, therefore, is something that I cannot stress more to my teachers. "Encourage and support authentic learning experiences that include digital citizenship as a component." They themselves have to be the ones modeling good Digital Citizenship if they expect their students to do the same. Nothing beats a good role model for encouraging the use of any skill, Digital Citizenship or otherwise.

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    1. Robbie absolutely agree with your entire post. I need my teachers to understand that it isn't just in the Media Center that the students learn digital citizenship. It has to be reinforced each and every time students are on computers when in the classroom as well. Many times I hear "Oh, Nancy covered that when my kids were in the library!!!"

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  32. To me, the Common Sense Education seems to be the most helpful aspect of teaching digital citizenship to my students. Modeling good digital citizenship will be most useful tool once school starts. I plan to offer weekly digital assignments, making sure to actively outline and discuss strategies to promote strong digital citizenship and then monitor students and their digital footprint. I also plan on visiting various teacher websites and letting students experience strong digital citizenship skills displayed by our educators. Lastly, with the upcoming Presidential Election looming, I will make sure to examine and discuss the candidates online presence and have students decide whether or not they are practicing strong digital citizenship or displaying poor, reckless, and questionable judgement.

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  33. My first step is going to be continuing to educate myself in this area until I am comfortable with that. I'm going to join the group mentioned and check out the websites so I can continue on with this topic outside of reading this book.
    I love the idea of having students Google themselves to see what's already out there and talking about how they need to keep that in the back of their mind going forward with internet usage.

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    1. I think that's a great idea to have students Google themselves. I'm going to have my students' parents do the same thing as they have moderate cognitive disabilities. Maybe it will help with educating the parents about footprints.

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    2. I love students reactions when they realize they actually can be found on the internet already.... really helps to hit home our point of view that what they put out there stays out there.
      Great Idea

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  34. This year, our school is going 1:1. I know there will be some bumps along the way, and to help myself and others learn from my experiences with 1:1 and teaching in general, I decided to start a blog using Wordpress. My initial purpose was to simply keep track of my lessons and reflect upon how they went and their effectiveness. I also wanted to share my reflections and ideas with other educators, so that I could learn from their comments and insight and vice versa. After reading this week's chapter, however, I also want to take my blog as an opportunity to model good, effective digital citizenship for other, including those in my school. I want to show others that start a blog and being involved in digital communities is not only easy, but also worthwhile. There is a multitude of knowledge to be gained from conversing with others outside of one's professional enclave, so why not take advantage of that?

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  35. The first step I will take is educating myself through this course, investigating the many references cited from the book, and speaking with others in this field about how they are implementing and promoting digital citizenship. I'm already learning quite a bit just through all of the postings on this blog each week.

    Prior to this course, I had never heard of "digital citizenship", so I feel like teaching awareness would probably be my next step in modeling and bringing parents and colleagues in on the conversation.

    In chapter 3, points #6 and #7 are the ones that were the most interesting to me. I addressed number 6 (don't expect positive dig citizenship culture to happen in a vacuum) a little in my week 2 response. I think that getting everyone on the same page is the largest obstacle in creating a positive dig citizenship community. We all have different ideas of morals, limits, etc. Point number 7 made some valid points regarding how the "lock and block" philosophy can hinder the opportunities for authentic learning experiences. I thought the analogy cited in the chapter comparing teaching our kids to drive and how to be part of the digital world was on point.

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  36. I find #3 and #5 to be most relevant to my school and classroom. Our district is 1:1 and has been for several years. I think we tend to assume that students know and understand digital citizenship. I think it is important to have open, on-going dialogue regarding appropriate use. Our school has implemented a Tier system for student to gain and lose internet access. We need to clearly explain expectations to students along with the implications and footprint left behind by poor decision making.

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  37. As school started this week I plan to keep educating myself by use of the websites. I also think that steps 3-7 will be easy to start with fellow teachers and educating them and myself more on becoming a good digital citizen. I then feel once I feel comfortable enough I will really get the students interested in this also.

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  38. The best way for me to get started is to educate myself about digital citizenship. I will review what is available on the companion website. Today my school had a PD training and I discussed digital citizenship with my colleagues.
    Four staff members (administrators/teachers)from every school in our district went to a 3 day training conference in Atlanta, Georgia. Several spoke out against cell phones at school. They were challenged. The presenters asked," what about the benefits of student collaboration and research"? Our district leaders agreed cell phones could be a valuable teaching tool. I saw this as a big step for our school district.

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  39. I plan to continue to educate myself about digital citizenship and to inquire about whether our school corp offers programs to help educate teachers/students. I believe that number 3 is extremely important. Talking about digital citizenship with students and other teachers can be a powerful tool to not only educate ourselves but to communicate to our students that this is an important topic that will be discussed and monitored throughout the year.

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    1. I agree that just getting the conversation started is so important. As I stated in my post, I never considered this topic until I joined my grad class and this book club this summer. Interesting since I've used technology in my classroom for years....

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  40. I think the best way for me to continue to educate myself about digital citizenship is to continue reading and implementing it into my classroom (step 1). I teach kindergarten so a big part of showing my students is to model and talk about good digital citizenship. Even though they may not fully understand all the terms and importance now, it's about laying the foundation, so as they go on to the next grade building blocks can be laid (steps 2-3) Giving them the opportunity to practice and discuss deeper as they grow in their learning (step 7). Letting parents know what you are teaching their child about digital citizenship would be a great way to involve parents in the learning process as well (step 4-5). Definitely realizing that good digital citizenship doesn't happen over night or that it's a one time teaching moment. Instead, it's an ongoing process and learning experience not only for the students but teachers, schools, and parents too (step 6).

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    1. I agree that communicating with your parents is a great way to educate parents. By encouraging your students to share what they've learned at school is a great way to start discussions at home.

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    2. I am amazed at how much our younger students know and understand each new school year. I walked into our second grade classroom yesterday to see all students using their iPad---this is our first year using iPads, but the students were using them very well. The teacher had reviewed our DC expectations and was very impressed at how well it was going.

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  41. I plan on educating myself on digital citizenship with this book club for a start. I really didn’t think about this topic too in-depth until we started discussing it here. I’ve also contacted the teacher that teaches digital citizenship in our building and invited her to join this book club as a resource.

    In addition, I plan on modeling good digital citizenship through our online portal, Canvas, as well as Google Drive. I’d like to provide my students with several opportunities this year to engage in online discussion forums through these digital portals and get a feel for publishing their work for a larger audience that is beyond their teacher. I would also like to use Canvas to communicate with parents more effectively, providing me with a parent audience regarding our classroom happenings, assignments, objectives, projects, exams, etc.

    Furthermore, I would like to continue my PLN by reactivating my Twitter account this year and sharing my handle with my students. I’d like to use this social media tool for professional development as well as a resource and example for my students. I just need to find the time to get back into it!

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  42. We are 10 days into school, and I have talked about digital citizenship every single day either to students or adults in the building. We are doing a 1:1 pilot with three teachers, and I reinforced digital citizenship with them before beginning. I am loved having students share with me what they are learning in their pilot classes, and it makes me excited that we are heading in the right direction as a building!

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  43. Joining this book club is just the first step in educating myself about digital citizenship. After reading through the responses by other participants, I play to do the following:
    1. Access the standards
    2. Join the Digital Citizenship Community
    3. Check out Symbaloo
    4. Participate in the state's digcit week
    5. Utilize Youtube for Kids to minimize inappropriate advertising
    6 Provide authentic online learning experiences as per #7. My co-teacher began showing me how to do this last year.
    I further like the idea of having a blog for my parents.

    This book club is giving me exposure to so many new ideas. Thank you.

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    1. Thank you Rebecca, I will check out Symbaloo- one of the greatest benefits of participating in these e-learning activities is learning about the resources that are out there.

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  44. I would like to keep educating myself about digital citizenship. Since starting this book study, I've gotten a job as an aide at our alternative school. The high school students will be using their Chromebooks to work on a program called GradPoint. I would also like to focus on #3 and #4. I have tried to teach my own kids about what they post, but I also think it's up to me to be a role model. I agree that the form we sign for Acceptable Use Policy seems to be pointless at times, especially when students still do something to break one of the rules. It's important they understand what the AUP really means.

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  45. With my school system going 1:1 this year and as a member of the technology committee, digital citizenship has been a buzz word I've heard frequently. I have tried to educate myself by simply understanding what digital citizenship is and what all it entails. Because I have teenage children, I have an additional interest in this topic as I have children who will be directly affected by their digital mark. I have not shied away from my children using media because I believe that I will be better able to help and train them as issues arise. I think because the topic is newer in schools, the teachers are less likely to talk about it. At times it is hard to talk about something you are unfamiliar with or do not completely understand. I really like the real-life applications with my students and my own children. Kids today are really into taking selfies. Their digital foot print is like their technology selfie. Most teens I know are excited to post a less than flattering picture of themselves on Instagram. The same is true then for their digital profiles. A lot of it boils down to education, modeling and then communication. If we are going to model it, that means we need to use it. I have started using Twitter to follow other professionals and to also start building my profile. Finally, I started using it to keep track of what my children are putting out there so I can teach and correct as the need arises. The more conversations we have, the less need to correct.

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    1. I really like what you said especially "Their digital foot print is like their technology selfie." Last year I did a display for our virtues board about thinking of others before yourself. It was about being "unselfie." Looking through the lens outward to see the good in others.

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  46. I liked the statement made by the author concerning online culture developing from our offline culture, so I plan to start the year by discussing how we currently treat each other in our every day environment outside of the digital environment. I agree with the idea that using digital media is one of the first steps to take in creating digital citizenship, and this is the first year that my classes will be using Kidblog to communicate in the classroom. I am somewhat new to blogging myself, so we will all be learning together.

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    1. I LOVE your idea of starting the year with discussing the way we treat one another in our day to day environment and how that leads to our interactions online. I would like to do the same.

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  47. I really liked the idea of spending 15 minutes a day on my own digital citizenship education. It's easy to carve out 15 (ok, it will probably be more like 10, lol) minutes to just continue to learn. I was also struck by #6 - it doesn't happen in a vaccuum. We need to make sure that we're education the whole child and focusing on what goes into their whole day, not just what pertains to my class. As a high school teacher, it's easy to get hyper-focused on what it happening in my 70 minute class and lose sight of what's happening outside those 70 minutes. I plan to continue to educate my students on digital citizenship, but hope to have some meaningful conversations with my school leaders as well as my peers on how we can extend digital citizenship throughout the school and into our students lives outside of school.

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  48. This school year I plan to highlight one of the 8 digital citizenship categories each month. I will tie it into one of our existing curriculum themes. For example, during our research skills units, I plan to teach creative credit and copyright skills combined with Information literacy (website credibility). I will create a monthly bulletin board and make it a school-wide theme for the month. Using various resources on Brainpop and Common Sense Media I will incorporate these 21st Century Skills into my technology classes and train teachers to incorporate these skills into their classroom while using iPads and laptops.

    1.Internet Safety (Inappropriate content strategies,Safe online navigation
    2. Privacy and Security (Identity theft,viruses/malware, Password habits,Targeted advertising, Customizing privacy settings, Spam and phishing)
    3. Relationships and Communication (Email etiquette,Flaming,Respectful communication habits, Online collaboration sites
    4. Cyberbullying (Conflict management strategies, Social media platforms and age requirements)
    5.Digital Footprints and Reputation (Importance of creating a positive digital footprint, Social sharing)
    6.Self-Image and Identity (Media influence, Positive online identity)
    7.Information Literacy (Credibility of online resources, Accessing online information)
    8. Creative Credit and Copyright (Ethical and legal use of online materials, Citing sources, Fair use /public domain/copyrighted materials

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    1. This is amazing! I didn't even think to put the information into such a list as this. Thank you!

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    2. This is a great idea. It is so important to have a structured plan for the year.

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  49. I am one of the teachers that LOVES to try to incorporate technology into my lessons as frequently as possible. Our school has a chromecart and PC lab for teachers to use. I also have a set of iPads that my classroom uses on a regular basis.

    Prior to this Book Club and my summer Grad classes I never considered Digital Citizenship very much. Now I am beginning to realize how important this topic is for me to understand and teach to my students, no matter what grade level.

    My plan:
    First, learn more about what Digital Citizenship is. I have learned so much through reading this text already and reading through the blog comments.
    Second, I plan to discuss with my students how they interact and treat one another offline. Using this conversation as a springboard for online citizenship/behavior expectations.
    Finally, I will continue to model (through my Google Classroom and Twitter Feed), discuss (on a weekly basis how we are doing and where improvements need to be made), and monitor our classroom digital citizenship (Our Digital Footprint).

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  50. This is our 5th year with 1:1 technology and we have been handing out the new devices to our students since last week. Our elementary building has a part time technology person who does bi-monthly digital lessons including digital citizenship at the beginning of each year. I have recently seen the DC papers that are given to the students as they receive their device. It covers the DC student standards. I have enjoyed reading the book and learning from all of your comments. I plan to place a copy (or two) of the corporation's student papers mentioned above in my classroom so I can readily refer to them and remind the students of their responsibilities.

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  51. Being the Media Specialist, I feel that it is my responsibility to be the role model for both students and staff in regard to digital citizenship. My biggest goal is to remember that a lesson is not going to be one and done. I think sometimes we think "I taught that in the beginning of the year, I am good!" but we have to remember when a problem arises it needs to be dealt with and a mini-lesson needs to happen at that point. I am sure many of us have had that problem that was stated in the book about being a "poopy-head". I had some students on our blog last year comment to each other in an inappropriate way. We were able to stop the lesson at that moment and discuss the ramifications of their actions. I think it is almost better to have something like that happen in the classroom because then students have it in real world application rather than just hearing about it. As the book said, it will make those students, as well as the rest of the class, remember what the protocol is for blogging in our building.

    I am going to take the first step very seriously. I love the idea of spending 15 minutes a day learning about digital citizenship. There is so much information out in the world that it could be overwhelming. Spending just 15 minutes a day is very manageable. As a matter of fact, all seven steps are very manageable when you take them a little bit at a time.

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  52. "Demonstrating Leadership." Considering the seven steps Susan discussed in this chapter, how will you start the school year educating yourself about digital citizenship or modeling good digital citizenship?

    As an outreach coordinator I have a little different role. As I begin to sit down to meetings with principals and they discuss their new initiatives to get more technology into the classrooms and buildings I'm now mindful of having them being cognizant of digital citizenship. I really liked how the book addresses that different communities have different expectations of appropriate online behavior. I think that is key when addressing parents and students and knowing how to present digital citizenship. Now when I work with schools and they begin to discuss technology I want to ask them what have they done to be proactive in the area of digital citizenship. Not assuming that faculty and staff know what that looks like will shape how the year begins which will set the tone for the rest of the year.

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  53. Until just recently I didn't realize all the different areas the title "Digital Citizenship" covers, but I had never really given it much thought either. I grew up in a conservative home and some things were taught at home and some things were taught at school and then discussed at home. I believe today this type of communication exchange no longer takes place, which I believe is sad. When I started researching and digging deeper into the idea of Digital Citizenship I soon came to realize how broad the topic truly is. I began my Digital Citizenship education/journey by researching the topic myself. I attended a few workshops this summer and now I am delving deeper into the topic by teaching the Common Sense Media coursework to my 6th Graders. We will begin our first lesson next week.

    I use some social media on a personal level, but I find that it just adds drama to life. I am slowly building my PLN. I know that I need to grow in this area as it has been said Social Media isn't going anywhere.

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  54. This book has been a great start into educating myself on the importance of digital citizenship. I will definitely be applying the steps outlined in this chapter in order to model good digital citizenship. Conversations need to start including students and the community about responsible use of technology. If we are not being good examples for our students about safe and responsible use of technology, where will they learn it from? The more we utilize technology in school in a responsible manner, the more students will be able to apply that knowledge outside of school.

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  55. Educating ourselves and being a good mentor are definitely the way to begin being a good digital citizen. I am a little hesitant to use Social Media platforms - I am one of the few people in the world without a Facebook page! I do have a Twitter account, but I don't really post anything. We have been using Class Dojo as a method of communicating with parents. There is a parent notification section for good and not-so-good behaviors, messaging with parents, posting class photos, and class announcements. It worked really well in my classroom last year, and I am excited to use more of the features this year. Using Class Dojo will help me practice and model good digital citizenship with my parents.
    I think step 4 has the potential to be very powerful in educating the greater school community. I am starting to think of ways to add a mini workshop for parents into one of our parent nights.

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    1. I personally don't feel there is anything wrong with you having a Facebook page as long as you demonstrate good digital citizenship. Don't post things you wouldn't say to someone's face or to your relatives. Also as long as you don't allow yourself to be sucked into some of the negativity you find, you will be fine. I personally stay connected to many of my relatives on Faceboook.

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  56. In my first few days of school, I have been actively modeling good digital citizenship in my communications with students. Many students will email me questions written in an informal manner. Even if it's a short question, I have responded in a more professional etiquette with them. Sometimes it's not a dedicated lesson to teach digital citizenship that's needed. Day-to-day interactions can be just as important in teaching students how to act respectfully and professionally online.

    To relate to step 7 about having authentic learning situations, I just yesterday had a similar situation to the two boys from the book. I have started using the site Nearpod as an alternative to Powerpoint. Students are able to submit answers and drawings that can serve as models through their Ipads. The studens were unaware that I could broadcast their screens to the whole class screens. A couple of students weren't giving serious answers, so I broadcast their answers to everyone's screens. Those students learned a quick lesson about accountability online. Many people have an assumption of anonymity that doesn't always necessarily exist on the Internet that can get them into trouble.

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  57. I will continue to follow educators on Twitter that tweet about digital citizenship and look for additional leaders. I will begin to explore the companion site to this book and looking through resources. (Anyone check it out yet?) I want to try to participate in Indiana’s Digital Citizenship Week. (Anyone already has plans or seen good resources for that?) I often mention digital citizenship during other lessons, but I want to spread out digital citizenship focused lessons more. I am going to start including some tech tips about iPads/digital citizenship for parents in our monthly newsletters, so I’ll be researching various topics for those.

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    1. Hi JoyAnn, I have shared this in a couple of places, but in case you didn't see it, there are complete lesson plans and materials for DigCitWeek on our IDOE page www.doe.in.gov/DigCitWeek. Select PLAN in the Toolbox. There are also a week's worth of parent messages under PROMOTE. Let me know if you have any questions. We'll also be exchanging ideas in the DigCit Community that Meri linked in this week's intro.

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    2. I am so glad there is a website to go to for lesson plans and materials to help teachers teach digital citizenship. Thanks for sharing!

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    3. Thanks Michelle! I'm hoping to work with my teachers to celebrate Digital Citizenship Week in September.

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  58. To add to what I said above, I think #3 will be my main focus for the year. I've already started working on #1 and 2 and a tiny bit on a few of the others. I want to bring up more conversations about it with teachers and students this year. Next school year I'd love for us to start some initiatives and apply for the Common Sense Media Digital Citizenship Certification, but to do that, I need to try to build some ideas, conversations, and ground work this year. The parent/newsletter piece I mentioned above also fits into #3.

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  59. I feel I model good digital citizenship by not posting negative things on my social media. I avoid being drawn into the negativity on social media. I plan on starting out the school year by teaching my students about good digital citizenship before giving them devices to use. My school is a 1 to 1 school for the first time this year. I want my students educated on what good digital citizenship looks like before handing over devices to them. I need to start monitoring my digital footprint. I would like to use the web tools Kidblog and Edmodo in my class this year.

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  60. I have read numerous points about when this begins, what it looks like, and who it all involves. For my students, Kindergarten, after educating myself on proper procedures, the next step will be engaging parents and working closely with them. Their participation is vital for the success of my students beginning school career and beyond.

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  61. Educating myself more on digital citizenship, and also my fellow teachers, is the first step. It is a topic that has not been discussed much in our school. It has been in terms of adult behavior online, but not directed towards the students. In my class, I am introducing digital citizenship to my students during our weekly class meetings. As we discuss not saying hurtful things to others, I am adding in about not doing it online. I feel that small steps like this is a good place to start with my 3rd graders.

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    1. This is how it has been approached at my school as well. We are told to be careful, don't post any pictures or say anything on social media, etc, but we haven't talked about it with our elementary kiddos.

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  62. I think I will start with just educating myself and the other teachers about digital citizenship. Our administration has been very clear on social media appropriateness with our staff and it has even been suggested that we not have personal social media sites, for our own protection, as teachers are held to a higher standard than other professions. I have not gone this far, but have certainly been more careful with what I post.

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  63. Personally, my favorite resource for digital citizenship is Instagram! I have discovered SO many educators from around the world who have the most amazing ideas and I can adjust them to fit my own classroom.
    As far as educating myself, I find it easier to take 15 minutes a day or longer periods of time during the weekend to discover a better understanding.
    I am going to try to make a classroom Twitter for my 3rd graders and allow them access to share what they have been working on as well as communicating with other classrooms.

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    1. I love Instagram too! I follow a number of educators online and would love to one day be among them.

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    2. I love Instagram too! I follow a number of educators online and would love to one day be among them.

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  64. Since we are incorporating a Digital Citizenship course for our middle schools this year, I am looking forward to continued discussions with my students about expectations and requirements.

    I have spent a lot of time on Pinterest this summer, searching Digital Citizenship. I have found many good lessons and resources that I can use in my classroom. I made a large poster using the acronym THINK for my room, to help remind my students and myself about what constitutes being a good digital citizen. It basically says, before you post something:
    1 - Is it True?
    2 - Is it Helpful?
    3 - Is it Inspiring?
    4 - It is Necessary?
    5 - It is Kind?

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    1. Thank you, Jenny, for posting this! I love the THINK steps. Hope you don't mind if I borrow that! What a simple, yet effective sign to post and go over with my students. I love short and to the point!

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  65. I started learning about digital citizenship ideas and curriculum many years ago when our school started talking about going 1:1 and I knew that this was something that our corporation needed. I have attended many conference sessions focusing on the topic and gathered multiple resources to share with my teachers. Throughout the years, I have continued to educate myself about digital citizenship and spent some a lot of quality time with the Common Sense Media website and resources. This year, I hope to work with our technology committee to try to move forward with the process.

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  66. First, I have engaged in conversations with the school principal and technology integration specialist. Both are aware of my interest in educating myself and participating with digital citizenship integration efforts within the school community. I use Facebook, Twitter, and Google Plus on a personal level. I feel skittish about using them professionally because I don't want to upset parents who may be fearful about social media. Locally, I feel Fifth Street Elementary School is a BRANDING POWERHOUSE of POSITIVITY! I would love to see our school district tap into the power of social media to build home-school relationship and author the story of our schools. After doing a web search of the school, I discovered we have an informational footprint (where we are located, school supply list, retirements and new hires, real estate, athletics, etc.). There is no need to monitor with alerts because no one is talking about us. Branding and modeling digital citizenship through social media would be a great start point for our school. I would love to hear from other participants who have done a web search of their school and discovered you, too, are a POWERHOUSE OF POSITIVITY. Share with us what you are doing...help us grow...

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  67. Educate! That is the the main thing. Find examples, have students find examples to share of misuse and the consequence. Give personal experiences. I have a picture of me in college having fun with the girls in my dorm. We are doing nothing wrong, but taken out of context is not a flattering picture. I use it to talk to my students about what it would take to make this picture into something more than what it was, and how an employer may look at it. I let them know the picture was taken at time before everyone had a camera on their phone. We have an open discussion on their experiences of how others may have tagged or posted pictures of them without their knowledge. Use teachable moments. This past school year I had a student take a picture of my during resource time, while I was helping another student. He photoshopped the picture to make it look like I was smoking, and posted it on snapchat. The photo was sent to me by a couple of students and passed on to the administration. The students was punished and talked openly about his punishment. Because he was willing to talk, it was a teachable experience for a lot of students. This is actually a student I like, and I am one of his favorite teachers. He thought he was being funny.

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  68. This book has been an eye opener for me. We do not have iPads or chrome books for the students and really students do not use etiquette when using their phones. They text or talk on the phones during class or have headphones on during lecture. A lot of educating needs to be done concerning proper use of technology. We have a group that is very tech minded and serves to help faculty use more technology with students. I intend to discuss with them the possibility of having more discussion with students on digital citizenship and involving parents in the discussion. My observation is that students use the technology but without specific knowledge of etiquette, possible problems or proper conduct among users.

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  69. First of all, just reading this book and participating in the book club is a big step for me.

    Secondly, talking and sharing what I'm learning with colleagues is very important as well. These informal conversations help me to apply knowledge and learn from my fellow teachers their thoughts on DigCit.

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  70. First of all, just reading this book and participating in the book club is a big step for me.

    Secondly, talking and sharing what I'm learning with colleagues is very important as well. These informal conversations help me to apply knowledge and learn from my fellow teachers their thoughts on DigCit.

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  71. Good question. I have taken a long time to think about this one. Educating myself will certainly be an ongoing process. I plan on asking questions and simply having conversations about what is good digital citizenship. I have and will join online communities that have more information on the topic. Hopefully I will find time to read what they have to say! Little by little we will all grow if we continue in our quest for knowledge and help each other learn. My colleagues are a great resource! I like how #6 says “Good digital citizenship stems from a positive school culture.” I think this is true, so I will think on this some more and consider how to foster a positive school culture. Of course I have direct influence on my classroom, but is there something more I can do?
    I need to set aside a little time, probably weekly, to find out more. Persistence is the key. (Never give up! Never surrender!) As I learn new concepts of digital citizenship, I can use them in my classes. I can look for activities where students can demonstrate good digital citizenship. I have always tried to show my students what a lifelong learner looks like, and this ongoing growth will be a topic to add in that pursuit. I like to show my students that I am learning something new and how I am working on it.

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  72. I plan to educate myself this year on ways to safely use social media,apps., and Google programs to make my "classroom" more well rounded and help connect with my students. I recently began teaching online at a Virtual School and I have to say it is definitely a learning curve. I was just watching YouTube videos this past weekend on ways that I could use Google programs, and social media apps to my classroom. I teach 7th grade English and Social Studies. I really liked the idea of using Google docs and allowing the students to post comments and questions for their peers via the program. I instantly was worried about the possibility of inappropriate/hurtful comments being made; this is Middle School after all.
    I am so glad to have read this chapter. I now see the importance of allowing these kids to work within these parameters in a structured and facilitated environment. I loved reading about the two little guys learning a lesson about what they post online. I think we all need to remain vigilant about our footprints and the things that we share.

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  73. the best thing we can do for digital citizenship is to not only learn what it is, but what it is not. Then we have to model it for our students, parents, and staff. As an administrator it is my job to lead by example. It can not be "do as I say, not as I do".

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  74. I agree that we need to do more to educate ourselves. I am curios how I can get more of my staff to incorporate these ideas into their lessons. I am looking forward to CH. 7 and digging into the resources to help me give them more ideas. I know we sign agreements, but do we really know what we are doing. I am constantly telling people that we don't know what we don't know. I hope to work with our IT director and get a plan together to make our system better.

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  75. I'm really looking forward to becoming #digcit certified through Common Sense Education this fall.

    Earlier this week, our corporation hosted a workshop on CIPA/COPPA/E-Rate and filtering for all secondary teachers. I'll be honest- in preparing for this workshop, I was very apprehensive. I wasn't sure how engaged everyone would be, but we felt it was important to start building a foundation and discuss on a large scale what our school does to consider online safety and student privacy. What COPPA asks us to do (to know what to use/what not to use even when everything is available to us) embodies one element of digital citizenship. I've also been vocal in criticizing schools for only focusing on one element of #digcit- cyberbullying. I think that we need to work together to learn all element of digcit so that we can be informed for our students. This is such a huge project to tackle, but I'm excited about the foundation we are all building together.

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  76. Here are some highlights of this chapter for me. I liked the concept of spending 15 min. a day improving my knowledge of Digital Citizenship. With everything else teachers have to do, this is a reasonable amount of time to spend per day, and I plan to do this. I would like to read The Power of Branding: Telling Your School's Story by Tony Sinanis and Joseph Sanfelippo. At the moment, my school corporation has some steep public perception obstacles to overcome. This sounds like a great book for us, and I would like to read it. I have been one of the teachers in my building to post updates to my school's Facebook page, so I plan to continue to do this when I attend extra-curricular events or have something to share in my classroom. A word of caution using Common Sense Education. A couple of years ago a group of parents utilized this site to protest many of our high school's novels used in English classes. English teachers found this very frustrating. Most high school novels have some violence, language, or adult situations. One of two lines taken out of context are very misleading. We had to educate our parents that high school and college prep literature doesn't always line up with their personal beliefs. I couldn't have graduated with a college degree in English without reading novels similar to the ones we are having our students read. They usually weren't reading the entire novel, but were using the summaries on Common Sense Education to object to them. I plan to continue to defend our reading selections. Our superintendent at the time was very supportive of the English teachers, which I appreciated. I teach ninth graders, so it is important to let them know how public comments they make on social media is. It is so easily accessible to prospective employers and college admissions employees. It is good to remind students that adults will do searches when they apply for jobs or to college. I need to become better informed about copyright issues and then make my students aware, too. I talk to them about citing sources and what public domain means, but I need to learn more detailed information about "fair, acceptable use."

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  77. I've tried to network with others through Facebook and webinars to stay up-to-date with what is going on in education and in technology. I try to develop a network that has people from several different areas, not just education or law enforcement (as that is my current field), so that I can get different perspectives.

    I have kids of my own who are now adults, and I use them as a resource at times. When I have probation clients come in and talk to me about video games, the Internet, or what have you, I have gone to my kids to have them discuss some of concepts with me, since they have a different perspective that I do.

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  78. One of the most important things to lead by example. I am very careful to check copyrights, etc. I also explain to them what I needed to do and how to handle different situation.
    The beginning of the school year is so hectic that my planning needs to happen the month before school so things are planned and ready to go.

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  79. I find myself to be pretty proficient at Steps 1 & 2, but now I'm working on steps 3-7. I try to keep myself updated on what's current and what I need to know for my students. In addition to that, trying to get all the stakeholders on the same page. Our students that have devices and technology feel like they should have no limits on their technology, some parents do not understand how technology can be an education tool, some colleagues also do not understand this. If everyone in the building followed the same guidelines and expectations and if these extended outside the building, I can only imagine how much more digitally aware our students would be about their technology imprint.

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  80. I fell I am pretty effective in steps 1-2. Last year, I attended a conference that gave examples of Kidblog, Padlet, and Kid Rex. I immediately started to have my students work on them, but then lost the newness. I think just starting to get in the routine of introducing and going over the rules and having the kids use different paths of digital citizenship within a week, will help put in place the foundation for a positive digital footprint. I really liked the example the author wrote at the end of the chapter.

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  81. I believe I need to focus at the beginning and work on educating myself about digital citizenship. I don't spend enough time exploring all of the resources available when it comes to digital citizenship. Spending 15 minutes a day exploring a topic sounds like an easy way to start. The online companion to this book will be a great place to start exploring.

    I also really like the THINK acronym that was posted in an earlier comment. I have seen it before, and it seems like such an easy reminder for kids when it comes to posting online. Discussing and acknowledging the importance of digital citizenship is something that needs to be incorporated as much as possible.

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  82. Just like the rest of the standards we need to work with the standards and start incorporating them into our lessons. When my class works in the computer room I plan on incorporating the standards into my lesson plans.

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  83. I use the internet a lot and I hope to incorporate it into my classes more this year. I want the students to know how to use the internet correctly, and responsibly. I plan on asking questions about what is Dig. Citz. through out the year and having conversations on what makes a good Digital Citizenship learner.

    I will continue to practice good digital citizenship and modeling for my students in my class.

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  84. I commented on our school's Facebook page and about telling our school's story for Chapter Two. It was great to see those same ideas incorporated into Chapter Three. I am planning to expand my use of Edmodo and to post more information about my classes on the school's Facebook page this year.

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  85. Steps three and four really stood out to me as I read this chapter. As I work with students and listen to them talk with each other, even when they think no one else can hear them, I am concerned with how much parents don't know about what is happening in the digital world. The parents don't understand the "lingo", they don't know about new apps that allow kids to be more secretive than ever. The other problem I see with parents is their concern with being more friends, than a parent with the students. I feel like I need to be constantly educating myself as to what is happening digitally so that I know what to look for as I work with my students. Taking time to help educate parents about good digital citizenship is a vital part of ensure a positive learning environment.

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