Monday, August 1, 2016

Digital Citizenship Week 2: Why a Community-Based Approach to Digital Citizenship?

This week we are reading and discussing chapter 2, "Why a Community-Based Approach to Digital Citizenship?" Susan's question at the end of the chapter seems perfect for our discussion this week. "What do you perceive as the biggest challenges you face in implementing a community-based approach to digital citizenship in your school or district?" Please share your thoughts and/or respond to other people's comments.

Great participation in week 1! I saw many new names amongst lots of friends of the book club. If you haven't already, be sure to complete the registration form. This is how we get participant addresses to send PGPs at the end of the book club. Also, make sure you are signed in to Google when you comment to blog posts and other comments. If you are not signed in, your comment shows up as from "unknown" so we don't know that you commented.

Next week we will be reading and discussing chapter 3, "Demonstrating Leadership."

185 comments:

  1. One of the biggest challenges that I see in our community is that some parents do not have access to technology at home. I know that most of my students do access the internet at home, but I do have a few parents that go to the public library to use the computers that are there. Another challenge is that most of my parents go to work early or come home late and often rely on family and others to supervise their children while they are at work. This does not foster a good example for students, when they can not access the internet and ask their parents questions they might have. I think that having times during the day and evening for parents and teachers to work together on Digital Citizenship would be a great idea!

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    1. I agree having parents available to spend time with their children when they are on the internet can be a challenge because of life/work schedules. Finding time in our busy schedules to discuss Digital Citizenship is definitely a topic that needs to be addressed because it involves everyone.

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    2. Love the thought of parents/students working together on digital citizenship! Might be a great idea for the classroom teacher to have a few homework assignments at the beginning of the school year where students and parents work together on digital citizenship. Promoting it at the beginning by doing activities together might create better practices throughout the school year!

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    3. I love the idea of families taking a digital citizenship course together. I think that is a great way to pull parents in and help them gain a better understanding of what digital citizenship is and why it is important.

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    4. Parents having time is a concern. In my district parents want the homework to be for the child and not for them.

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    5. When I went to the workshop on CommonSenseMedia.org they have a parent component. I haven't really looked into it but was thinking we could hold mini workshops in our parent room using it. I think getting a lot of parents to come in would be somewhat difficult but thought it was worth a try. https://www.commonsensemedia.org

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    6. We held a parent night in our district about a year ago. We publicized widely and only had about 20 parents show up. TWENTY! We have 16,000 students! It's pretty difficult to get parental involvement so educators have to be creative when it comes to delivering content. I'm speaking at a school in November where I will be one of three stations for parents during a parent night. That way parents may show up for another topic yet still be there for the DigCit discussion. P/T conferences, maybe?

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    7. I think one of the problems too the differences between homes as to what their children are allowed to do. As a 6th grade teacher, some of my students have iphones and ipads, instagram and twitter accounts. Other students do not have any of these and are only allowed 1 hour of screen time a day. When you have such a wide range of what is allowed, it makes it hard to get the community and school as a whole on the same page.

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    8. Josie and Amy puts their fingers on two major concerns, it seems to me - parental time, and the wide range of standards that families have when it comes to access to devices. I love the idea of asking kids and parents to do activities together, as Heather, Melissa and Josie suggest, but it seems we do need some way to get buy-in from the community first, so that they actually do it. Robbie's idea of P/T conferences might work - unless you have trouble getting parents in for those. I hate to scare them into it by sending home letters of what COULD happen - and it's counterproductive. What other strategies are out there?

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    9. I think that would be a great idea for teachers to have student/parent digital citizenship homework assignments at the beginning of the school year. Another idea might be to come up with a parent survey to see what parents do and don't understand about digital citizenship. We can't expect parents to help us teach their children about digital citizenship if they themselves don't understand it.

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    10. I agree that too many parents are uninformed about the dangers of too much freedom at home with mobile devices. I strongly believe parents should monitor their child's use of devices and only allow them to use them in family areas and not after bedtime in their rooms.

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    11. I posted an update in the DigCit Community that comes from Common Sense Education. The video covers a lot of new and updated resources. I think one struggle with parents is that they don't know what they don't know when it comes to digital citizenship (just like us educators). Having VERY specific topics to engage them in can be a game changer. If you haven't already visited CSE's series on Parent Conversation Cases, go to https://www.commonsensemedia.org/educators/connecting-families/discuss

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  2. Good morning, everyone! I wanted to take a moment to introduce myself since I neglected to last week. My name is Meri Carnahan and I am on the eLearning team and have the privilege of moderating the eLearning book clubs. I will be sharing the discussion prompts each week and reading all of your wonderful thoughts and ideas. As you all hopefully saw last week, I am joined here in the blog by Michelle Green, also from the eLearning team, who is spearheading our digital citizenship initiative.

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    1. Hi Meri! Hi Michelle! The discussion last week was really good - I'm struggling with this week's question so looking forward to others' takes on it. Thanks for organizing this opportunity.

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  3. The first challenge I find in implementing a community-based approach to digital citizenship is having internet access. My building is still working on having enough computers and internet access throughout the building. The district is having a technology boot camp next week which I see as a positive sign to having internet access this school year. Once the teachers receive this professional development I feel it is a natural step to then include parents and the community. Hopefully during our “Back to School Night” we will be able to share internet information with our parents.

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    1. I think that your "Back to School Night" is the perfect time to introduce the concept of what it means to be a Digital Citizen! To remind parents that once something is put on the Internet....it is always there!

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    2. I like the idea of introducing this at Open House. I wonder how best to introduce the concept to parents, as I feel that authentic engagement with families will be a big challenge. I'm not sure a handout will even be read by many of my busy families. Perhaps there is a way to include students in introducing the material. I also think that social media could be used throughout the year to continue the conversation with families. I'm hoping to use Facebook this year for that communication. How were you thinking of introducing the topic at open house?

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    3. I agree with internet access being a big factor in a community-based approach. We have been 1:1 for 4 years and this will be 5 with new devices for our students. Still, many parents of my elementary building do not have access. Last year I had a family with no computer at home--the parents' cell phone was the only way the student could get on and that was when the parents were home. We have a small public library with 2-3 computers, but supervision is not always what it could be at home. Many things to continue to consider.

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    4. Back to School night is a good idea! Maybe introduce by doing a search for something and showing how it's still there? I was trying to look for Olympics videos earlier - something inspirational about "trying," to show the kids - and came up a video from 1994, in which a runner tore a hamstring but he kept moving along the course. But of course that's famous. . . You should doubleck ahead of time, of course, before doing a search for yourself or your parent and see what's there. My dad's young photo is around, because he worked on the Univ of Alabama student newspaper in the early 60s, and there've been a couple of books written about that time - it was the weirdest thing to see my 20 year old father pop up on the Internet. There's also a reference to my grandfather driving a bus, because his niece wrote a memoir - anyway, there are just weird tidbits that maybe you could show, to explain: You never know what will be there and, Once it's there, it doesn't go away.

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    5. Back to School night would be perfect.

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    6. I like the idea of showing students how easy it is to find "old" stuff online about people they know or about family members of people they know (of course with careful screening ahead of time). This is a good reminder that not even the personal information of people who lived long before the Internet existed is private. Old photos, journal entries, private letters can all be scanned and used to create a digital footprint with or without a person's consent. We need to help students learn that that is the new reality we all live in. Of course, as Susan Bearden points out, such publication can have positive as well as negative consequences. Back to School night and the first few days of school are a valuable time to emphasize that we all have to help each other use technology wisely.

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    7. We did something different with back to school night this year. We have ours on the fourth day of school. Parents always want to talk about their students, but with 150 students, we as teachers don't know them well enough. 6th grade teachers especially get slammed. This year we set up mini courses for parents to attend. One dealt with the LMS, one with the online grade book and text books, one talked about study skills, and so forth. Digital citizenship would be a great topic to add on this ight.

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  4. I believe the greatest challenge in implementing a community based approach to digital citizenship in my corporation would come with the follow through of the same responsible practices at home that are being taught in the classroom. I teach in a rural, working class community where both parents typically work. Are they home to monitor students digital work? Do they know how serious the topic really is? I love how the book mentioned knowledge is power and it takes a village to raise a good digital citizen. Educating both the child and parent for safe use is so very important. I believe with young children, an adult should be present to monitor what the child is working on. Just as if they would monitor any other homework. This can be very challenging for busy, working households.

    A community wide understanding of digital citizenship is very important. Our children may be watching and reading what is getting written on community Facebook sites, for example. I have read many inappropriate comments and even bullying/bashing of others on community Facebook pages. Community members need to understand they are a stakeholder when it comes to helping our kids. Conduct online should be kept appropriate at all times. It is as simple as thinking first before regretting later what you might type!

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    1. I agree with what you said about community members posting inappropriate comments etc. on social media. Adults have to be the best example to all children. I wish people would think before posting comments in the heat of the moment or with emotions running high.

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  5. Overall, the biggest challenge would be getting everyone (parents, educators, administrators, and students) on the same page. Just as every classroom has different expectations, every home has different rules and guidelines for Internet access. Likewise, there are several adults who don't see the necessity of gaining more digital citizenship knowledge. Having the community buy in, and everyone on the same page is difficult. We can work so hard at school, and students may go home with either more or less restrictions. Unfortunately, there are many adults who don't completely understand the importance of digital citizenship. As the parent of two teenagers, it takes a lot of time, effort, and energy to monitor what is being done digitally.

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    1. I agree with the fact that many students go home and are left unsupervised on the internet. It is definitely a challenge to get everyone on the same page, a goal might be to at least plant the seed and hopefully some changes in guidelines for internet use at home will happen.

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    2. I agree that getting all stakeholders on the same page is a challenge. I like the questions posed on pages 16 and 17. Technology as an educational tool is here to stay. Educators need to model how to use social media in a manner that promotes educational opportunities and positive communication.

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    3. Connie- I thought those questions were very powerful, too. This chapter really helped me realize that teaching digital citizenship is my responsibility as a classroom teacher. If I have trouble getting any of my fellow teachers on board, I think I'll have them read those pages.

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    4. It is so hard to get everyone on the same page, and you are very correct in that it takes a LOT of time and energy. Unfortunately, many parents don't even know where to start.

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    5. It's can definitely be challenging to get everyone on the same page. With so many different people involved, ideas and expectations can be so different from school to home and from one home to another. Getting parents to all understand the importance of digital citizenship can be difficult as well. They don't always see it as important or something to worry about.

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    6. It would be remarkable to get everyone on the same page. It is tough when you come from a big district. I also get frustrated when you work so hard and only 20 out of 700 families participate. But then again I think it is 20 families that are getting the education and 20 is better than none.

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    7. It may be impossible to get everyone on the same page, but a realistic starting place is to dialogues that build common language and a shared vision for what students will do and how they will be seen as digital citizens. There are resources for creating a school community wide vision in the DigCit Community. And there are great family engagement activities here: https://www.commonsensemedia.org/educators/connecting-families/share

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    8. Totally agree here. Getting everyone on board and having the same expectations would take a miracle.Beginning the dialogue is the first step. Getting the info to parents is the next step. The thing to think about is how we communicate that info. Notes home often stay in folders.

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  6. Some of the biggest challenges that our district faces are: 1) communicating the importance of digital citizenship, 2) parent participation - due to work schedules, and 3) follow through.
    It is not impossible to do and we have to start somewhere, but these are just a few challenges that need to be addressed while planning a community based program on digital citizenship. I also feel that school staff need to be trained first before rolling it out to the community.

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    1. I agree! School staffing is a good time to discuss and then receive training on Digital Citizenship. After the training it will be easier for teachers to open the discussion of Digital Citizenship with their students, and possibly have an assignment that can be done at home, with parents, to start making the connection. Maybe open the conversation of what Digital Citizenship is in the home!

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    2. That is a great idea! It is a great way to start little by little with parents.

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    3. Yes, follow through--with all involved (parents, teachers, administration, training, etc.). Sometimes I feel overwhelmed with many "new" things each year, not knowing which is better to follow through and little time to do it.

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    4. Totally agree that staff needs to be educated prior to parents. Once teachers are trained, they can answer the parent questions. It is important for parents to buy into our training and it most definitely would hit a snag if we couldn't answer questions they ask.

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  7. I would very much agree that getting all of the different groups together to adddress this issue may be difficult. My greatest concern would be getting students to join in and agree. Many young people believe and there is much to suggest that they are correct that they understand internet usage better than the adults. They also like having the upper hand on the issue. This can be a difficult issue to overcome. They like their freedom and greater knowledge. They need to buy into the discussion and be open minded to the discussion. Parents need to be open to the discussion and their vulnerability as do teachers.

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    1. Not that I always agree with scare tactics, but last year we had an officer in charge of the cyber crimes unit in Indianapolis come speak to our students during the day and parents in the evening. It was very eye opening for everyone and I saw quite a few students looking very uncomfortable during the presentation!

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    2. Janice, you bring up a good point - parents, students and teachers have to be open to this discussion, and be willing to be vulnerable. That is a tough order. But it's definitely worth trying, and continue to work on, for all of us. I do think that there are periodically scare stories in the media, and while I agree that they're not an ideal method to use, and can be counterproductive, they do bring the issues to the forefront of parents' and students' minds, so you never know when you might find a receptive ear!

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    3. I think that involving cyber crime officers to talk to every group would be most effective since they have seen the fallout of the poor digital citizenship problem.

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  8. I think the biggest challenge would be developing a consistent plan of how to teach students about digital citizenship. Since our time with our students is limited, there may be problems instilling that plan with our students because of the limited interaction we have with them. Once students leave our classroom, they are free to participate digitally in whatever way they feel inclined. Our challenge as educators is to develop open lines of communication with those outside of school to help these students safely navigate our digital world.

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    1. I agree with your statements. We can monitor students with technology within our educational setting. We can discuss real-life stories how important it is to keep a positive digital footprint. We can model all these things for our students. However, as soon as they leave our classroom it is up to them.

      I have the hope that as I teach about digital citizenship they will pass this information on to their parents. For example, an easy lesson to incorporate within my content area would be the importance of secure user names and passwords. This could be done when I bring them to a computer lab for an assignment online.

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    2. I agree that developing a plan addressing Digital Citizenship and that correlates with our school character plan needs to be consistent. Additionally finding time in the school day to address these topics is difficult. Last year I kept the key character traits up in my classroom all year addressing individual traits when a learning opportunity presented itself.

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  9. The biggest challenge to implementing a community-based approach - wow. Big question. In my district, our biggest challenge would be to bring everyone onto the same page, which others have mentioned. I'm a little haunted by Melissa McCain's post in the 1st week about how teachers could turn their cards to be BYOD on or off, and some teachers turned theirs to off and never turned them back. There is a huge disparity in comfort levels with technology, and a huge variety of technologies that we're talking about, and a huge variety in the kinds of things that people need to know to become digital citizens. Getting everyone in the community familiar with the devices and products, and getting them all to understand that this stuff is serious, and posts and comments can have significant consequences, really kind of blows my mind, especially if we are unable to convince all of our teachers that they have to pay attention to this in their own lives, and in the lives of their students. I think as we move along people will get increasingly comfortable with it - it just takes firm emphasis that this IS important, and does have to be addressed. And now of course we have computer science standards, including ones about digital citizenship! So that will be helpful in emphasizing its importance.

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    1. I agree that many people are not familiar or comfortable with all of the devices and different applications of social media, which makes it hard to get everyone on the same page.

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    2. I agree that this is a big undertaking. Getting everyone trained at school, involving the parents, being consistent at school and at home and keeping the initiative front and center in the community. We have to start somewhere and sharing what we know with other staff members and incorporating Digital Citizenship into the curriculum is one way to start. Informing the parents of what is going on in the classroom is also very important. I do teach conflict resolution and the author gave me a great idea to teach how to negotiate disagreements both online and offline and how it is important to be an upstander. Students need to educate their friends, family, and other students about how to stay safe online. It is a community effort.

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    3. Barbara - great to hear that you got a great idea for your classroom from the book.

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    4. I think part of the problem here is that we still have teachers who think technology is an option. Technology is no longer a privilege...it has become a right. As educators, our job is to educate, not in the best way we know how, but in the best way our students learn. If technology is THE best way, then we best be using it. However, I'll also be the first to say that if it isn't the best "learning practice" (vs. teaching practice) then it should most definitely NOT be used.

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    5. I am right with you on this Robbie. We shouldn't use technology just to use technology. The lessons being introduced should be real world and authentic to ensure student success outside of the classroom. One again I believe consistnancy is the key and a district needs to understand the importance of digital citizenship and be willing to do whatever is possible to ensure success in their district.

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    6. Robbie, I find the part where you say that teachers still think it's an option to be very accurate and telling. Several do still see it as an option or just a way to digitize what they've always done instead of going deeper. We must all integrate technology and find a way to do it with intent and meaning. You're right that in today's society it really isn't an option anymore. If we want students to be a twenty first century learner and be ready for the world, meaningful technology integration and real life applications will be part of how we equip them.

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  10. A community-based approach to digital citizenship is the best approach. The same roadblocks educators encounter with citizenship differences between school and home are the same for digital citizenship. We cannot control parental oversight, but we can control how we model good citizenship. Getting parents involved through family nights, etc. is a great way to help parents navigate the every-changing digital world. And it is our responsibility to protect children while in our care.

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    1. Thank you for your statement--"We cannot control parental oversight, but we can control how we model good citizenship." I couldn't agree more. In my district I believe most parents will do what they want to do and we can do very little to change their minds, now there will be a few parents who will listen, take heart and want to be involved with their child's digital life. But, if we can model good citizenship and exemplify the appropriate behavior then eventually it will make a difference in our kids.

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  11. I think one of the biggest challenges is that our students spend a lot of unsupervised time on the net and social media. They are unaware of much of the data-mining going on, and the implications to some of the things they are sharing and doing. Many of them have formed some habits way before they get any instruction in school. We see this especially when school begins again; some students are practically addicted to their phones and go through withdrawal when classes begin (like it did for us today). Many parents are unaware of some of the dangers as well (as am I!) The analogy of trying to put the toothpaste back in the tube after it's out is reasonable.

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    1. I couldn't agree more! When you take a look around you can find so many kiddos of all ages flies to their phones...and what are they searching for and/or doing?? I don't think many parents even know. I once had a parent tell me that they take their kids phones at 9:00 every night. She said that nothing good can come of using a phone after then. She then told me that she checks their phones because they shouldn't have anything to hide... Sometimes I feel that these phones often hinder their true social communication.

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    2. I agree phones hinder communication. Parents would do well to lead by example. I find many young parents using cell phones when out at a restaurant. All heads are down with no conversation. Being the example is important.

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    3. I think the fact that BALANCE is included in the Common Sense Education's Family Media Guides points to the need. If you haven't looked at these guides, you might want to visit:
      https://www.commonsensemedia.org/sites/default/files/uploads/connecting_families/family_media_agreements_k-12.pdf

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  12. After thinking about this question, I thought about it through a couple different lenses. First, at the district level, the biggest challenge would be to ensure that everyone at each school received the same training. Our district seems to have a large amount of families that bounce from school to school. On another hand, we as educators can't control our students' home life and what their parents allow or don't allow. In a "perfect world," we could educate the educators, parents, and students at different times, and show them all the different roles to make a responsible digital citizenship. All three of these groups need to be taught or have discussions in different ways. Parents need to understand what all is "out there" in the social media and digital world. Students need to learn that what "footprints" they leave behind and the places on the web they visit can make a major impact or even put them in danger. Educators need to know what to look out for, what to educate in their own classrooms, and what the best means of communication would be for their classroom environment. This in itself is a big challenge. All 3 audiences need a different way to be educated. I feel this is probably an issue in many districts.

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    1. Rachel, I cannot agree with you more! We have done an excellent job of setting the stage for going 1:1. In our building we have offered parent book studies on technology usage. Our 1:1 roll-out involves parents and students watching a brief video. We also have parent nights on our calendar. These nights are to basically teach digital citizenship to parents similar to how we are working with kids. We know that we won't reach all parents-and often the parents that need to be there- but we have to start somewhere. I think you have GREAT ideas.

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    2. Rachel, this was helpful to me that you broke down the differing needs of the three groups. Ashley, I appreciated your enumerating what you do in your district to notify parents and educate them.

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  13. I teach young students ages four and five. Some of the students are left to entertain themselves with tablets or computers without a lot of supervision. I had some students who knew how to get to different sites on their own such as YouTube. YouTube isn't always age appropriate for young children. On the kindles they would often click on games to download on their own. I had to work with students on staying on learning app that we were on. I also had a side by side workshop showing parents age appropriate games and talked to them about the importance of supervising and setting limits with technology.

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  14. My biggest challenge with connecting with digital citizenship is the age of my kiddos. I work with 3 year olds...many have already mastered the iPad and their parents smart phones. So it is super important to begin teaching digital citizenship at a young age and connecting it with parents. As a preschool we work hard to incorporate technology within our rooms and then connect to the parents at home. Each week we are required to do a blog...the parents can check the blog anytime to see what we are doing within the classroom. I have always encouraged parents to sit down with their child and navigate the blog together. I include links to websites we have used or videos we have watched. I know personally as a parent and as a teacher that I am not as tech savvy as I should be. Understanding apps like snapchat and Instagram often seems to be foreign to me. There are so many apps out there that often allow kids to hide what they are searching or doing on the Internet. I love the quote from this chapter that says kids leave the school and have an "unsupervised digital playground" how true is that!!?? I think that if parents and educators can unite and find the positive in teaching digital citizenship it can only make the connection between school and home that much stronger! After all...we should be a team!

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    1. I agree that it is difficult with 3yo's, but it's never to early to start the discussion in little ways like why it's important to do something other than hold a phone and play games all the time.

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  15. I know that I am probably part of the problem rather than the solution when it comes to a community based approach in my school. I have a lot to learn about all the digital dangers as well as opportunities our students face these days and like many of our teachers I don't know when I will find the time to learn about it all. I guess this book study is a good start! Also, I think most of the time our high school students recognize right from wrong whether it is online or in person and if we continue to preach and model doing the right thing regardless of the medium, I know my students are smart enough to recognize the right thing to do. Now, just like teenagers (and adults) throughout history, they may not always choose the right thing to do. The internet just offers a much wider and less forgiving audience for our mistakes and poor choices.

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    1. Mrs. Schaffner, you are so correct about a less forgiving audience! This statement makes me feel that one point I should make with my students is that once they hit the "send" button, their message is actually sent, and there is no "undo" button.

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    2. When it's online it's online for life!
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kdkfVzVhcQQ

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    3. The media reports the negative results of unfavorable postings on social sites. Maybe, as teachers, we can use what the media reports to demonstrate how important it is to model good digital citizenship.

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    4. Robbie, I love the video - can I show it to the teachers in my school? I don't know the protocols - see how much I need this book? Thanks!

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  16. I believe that the hardest part of a community approach to teaching digital citizenship is the newness of digital citizenship itself. I am still learning the facets of digital citizenship and HOW I will be teaching those key concepts to students. I feel that once I iron out how I will teach digital citizenship it will be easier. Sharing classroom discussion topics with parents in our classroom newsletter will be one way to involve others. I plan to include tips and maybe a question to discuss with your students at home. Ideally, I hope to integrate digital citizenship in my content areas and grasp teachable moments. Our district is going 1:1 this year, so this is a learning process for us all.

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    1. Integration is key! Separate lessons that teach skills are very important, but the actual application of the concepts is what really hits home.

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  17. Ashley, continual or ongoing conversations about digital citizenship multiple times and encouraging parent/child conversations is a great idea; it cannot be learned in one meeting. I know of a school that makes parents sign a AUP along with students; one that corresponds to their vision for expected behavior. The idea comes from the book, that getting all groups to develop their AUP may help them follow it more consistently. The greater challenge I see is getting the community to get on board. A local area Facebook post became international news because of an aunt of a student. How do we get the community on board?

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    1. I think students do want to talk about digital citizenship too- last year, our librarian made several presentations related to online ethics, and I was impressed with the student response to her discussions.

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  18. I think it may be challenging to get others "on board" when it comes to teaching and practicing digital citizenship as a community.

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  19. Well, I posted yesterday at about 10am and now cannot find my post. So, here we go again....

    I think the biggest challenge to a community-based approach to #DigCit is that while most people think DigCit is important, at the same time they buy-in to the Digital Natives concept that because a child is a child they inherently know how to use technology and how to use it appropriately. Tie that in with the fact that many if not most adults (teachers and parents alike) don't understand DigCit themselves, and you've got a recipe for catastrophic consequences.

    In our district we formally teach DigCit throughout our media centers’ information literacy curriculum, and it's very important that this instruction occurs. However, all of the planning and effort that is expended to help our learners "know" about DigCit is worthless if when they are asked to use technology in class or in their everyday lives they are not also asked to use and follow the DigCit guidelines that are taught formally. I see this in classrooms all across the state. Students are asked to write a paper or create a presentation, even at the upper elementary levels, yet they are not required to at minimum make a list of the resources that were used in their research, much less create a bibliography. Or they are asked to build a multimedia presentation and they are allowed to use music in a way that gratuitously breaks copyright law.

    It is this educator's opinion that we need to begin a community approach with those who have much influence and spend the most hours per day with our students (at least during school days)....their teachers. If we as educators expect our students to follow DigCit rules, we need to model as well as expect correct use among ourselves. With time being a very expensive resource and standardized tests being the be-all-end-all in education, educators cannot take away from the instruction that must occur with language acquisition and math skills. However, they can still be a HUGE influence on their students in the way they handle themselves as models for DigCit use professionally through embedded conversations about technology use and requiring the use of DigCit when creating assignments.

    Therefore, it comes down to professional development of our educators. I’ve lead numerous workshops on this topic, and many people leave saying, "I never knew DigCit was such a huge topic." And, "Every educator needs to hear this." This indicates to me that there are many out there who could benefit from the DigCit message.

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    1. I think your opening statement is perfect - too many times, we just assume kids know how to use technology. Can they post to social media or play games? Sure. But do they know how to use it to further their education? To stay safe? To research? These are the skills they are lacking.

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    2. I completely agree, kids may know how to post to social media, but many times they DO NOT know how to use technology in productive ways to benefit themselves and their education. I believe many of them look at it as a toy, where I believe we need to teach them to look at it as a tool.

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    3. The Toys vs Tools perspective is why I think some have taken to referring to what is essentially digital citizenship as Digital Intelligence:
      https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2016/06/8-digital-skills-we-must-teach-our-children/

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  20. I worked in a middle school so digital citizenship (although not termed that) is huge. As the book references, many are able to interact with anonymity and with that anonymity comes courage that we do not usually have when we are face to face. I think the biggest challenge is dealing with fostering good citizenship even when we are anonymous. How does a school set boundaries with what students do online and when it comes into the class and effects students and learning. When discussing citizenship we are also discussing parental involvement. We might have a lack of internet availability in the homes but most parents have cell phones with internet access. Including them in conversations will be key but a challenge for schools with low family and community engagement.

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  21. I have read these posts and have wondered about my response... So, I am just going to float a few thoughts that came to me as I read this chapter. These are the things I am puzzling through and considering as we approach this year with 1:1 devices.

    1) I feel like what we are trying to do now is similar to giving a teen a car, letting them drive and THEN teaching them the rules of the road, driving etiquette and safety. Many of these children have had their devices for such a long time that their habits are ingrained and opinions formed. Their parents have accepted/resigned themselves to the technology and apps. My fear/concern is not the need for Digital Citizenship Training, but the battle to convince our audience of the need for it.

    2) Are there different models for each stage of development for this training? It seems that children/toddlers start using technology with games and learning tools. For my own children at least, this transitioned into socializing. Then it morphed into academic pursuits in addition to the social. As a parent, we have enlisted many different strategies to teach our children what we expect. As a teacher, I have been blown away what they have learned to do while at school from their teachers and friends. Sadly, much of the blown away has not been positive. My children learn more from their peers than they do from us as teachers. So, as children's interests change, I feel their training should evolve with it.
    As I continue to read, I hope to become more clear on a direction we could take.

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    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    2. I agree with your points. Many children start using devices as toddlers. They know how to download apps, have online conversations with their gaming devices, and many parents probably haven't had issues thus far. How do we convince parents that there is a need for digital citizenship training if they don't perceive there to be a problem?

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    3. This is a great analogy. I saw one teacher have kids compare and contrast technology use at home with tech use at school: purpose, type, etc. At home, it's mainly used to distract/entertain/relax. At school, we have different purposes. I think this is a part of digital citizenship. It's a type of code switching, just like with formal language. I think we need to recognize all their experiences and their different uses of tech in order to have an authentic conversation.

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    4. Love the idea of the compare and contrast activity.

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  22. My school district will face many challenges with implementing a community-based approach to digital citizenship. First, the school district is not 1:1. Each classroom has 3 computers and class sizes range from 25 to 32. Next, all staff must buy-in. Some are reluctant to use technology as a teaching tool. Then, everyone must be trained. Finally, parents, from low economic areas, do not have technology in the homes. They tend to have a hands off approach to education. If all community members could see the advantages and the district had the funds maybe we could move forward.

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    1. Maybe you and your district are the ones to accomplish correctly digital literacy and the roles educators should play in the instructions prior to placing school owned devices in the students' hands. The more I read others' posts, it seems that most of us have the process going in reverse, and it isn't working well; with the rush to digitalize curriculum, the students' best interests were forgotten. The first doesn't always mean the finest. It is likely most of your students already have their personal devices for which some training would be beneficial with or without going 1:1. In many ways your district can learn from others' mistakes.

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  23. Teaching digital citizenship comes with many challenges, but in my view, the biggest challenge is the speed with which students find ways around the controls placed on their Internet access at school. Students are very resourceful and as soon as a new control comes along, they seem to figure out a way to get around it. I believe that most students do know right from wrong, and most students choose right, but the temptation to use a shortcut in completing assignments seems pretty alluring, given the many ways they devise to get around controls. Clearly, we can't control what they do at home, especially when so many students have access to hours online without any supervision. That is another big challenge with no easy answer.

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    1. I forgot about this issue!!! Staff and students weren't allowed to print from our chromebooks but from desktops it was okay. It was quite annoying if you weren't at a desktop but needed something printed quickly. By the end of the year students figured out how to print and I had to have them show me. While getting around the controls is almost always not a good thing I was thankful they figured it out and were willing to show me.

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    2. This is so true! Students are quick to find ways around settings & blocks placed on their devices. They are always figuring out new ways to get around something. Just one more reason to stress the importance of digital citizenship to our students. So, they are able to determine when it's okay to go around a block and when it's not.

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    3. Students at our school were able to bypass the filters and were on YouTube and Facebook, etc. The teachers were blocked and the students were not.

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    4. Students at our school were able to bypass the filters and were on YouTube and Facebook, etc. The teachers were blocked and the students were not.

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    5. I am so glad you brought up the topic of student resourcefulness and getting around blocks. On page 14 of the text, the author mentions doing a Google search for 'Get around web filter' and it turned up 81,700,000 results. I tried the same Google search and it turned up 4,150,000 in just .66 seconds. rhallberg mentioned printing blocks on the Chromebook. I decided to do another search on that topic. The results were 104,000 in just .83 seconds. I feel one of the greatest challenges, in spite of efforts of CIPA, is the accessibility to information that is counterproductive to Digital Citizenship efforts. I believe educators have a responsibility to embrace the use of technology with positivity and productivity as a learning tool.

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  24. I think the biggest challenge in our school is making sure we have enough computers and internet access throughout the building. Honestly, I also think getting all teachers on board with implementing digital citizenship and being knowledgeable about it would be a start. I think our staff, including myself, would benefit from some kind of professional development to make sure we are all on the same page.

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    1. I never thought of having a professional development on it. I wonder if there is a resource or person out there that teaches this and the school can have come in? That would be fantastic!

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    2. I'm available and have done this for many districts across the state.
      Get it touch with me...

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    3. I would also encourage you to watch for the next offering of Lead In
      http://www.ciesc.k12.in.us/leadin

      And of course, ongoing learning can take place in the DigCit Community.

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    4. I would also encourage you to watch for the next offering of Lead In
      http://www.ciesc.k12.in.us/leadin

      And of course, ongoing learning can take place in the DigCit Community.

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  25. One of the biggest challenges of implementing digital citizenship is getting the students to understand and accept the challenge of responsibility. It is so easy for the students to want to play games or watch movies without anyone knowing what it is they are doing. I do not think that parents understand how much time the kids are spending doing other things on the computer besides homework.
    I hope that by promoting the idea that kids need to accept responsibility for their online actions it will help them make good choices, but I must admit that I am skeptical about how seriously they will take the idea.
    We are handing the students a window into the world on a silver platter and while we as teachers and parents recognize all the wonderful opportunities that can benefit their education, we can't ensure their success because of the ample opportunities students have to make the wrong choice.

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    1. Hi Amanda,
      I agree with you that one of the biggest challenges is getting the students to take responsibility. I think at a young age students don't understand how their actions on the internet really affect themselves as well as others. I was first thinking that the biggest challenge was getting everyone on the same page, finding the time to get the lessons in and the parents responsibility to monitor their children at home until I read your post. We can teach it to the students every year and begin at a young age but the students themselves have to take responsibility and understand it which I find very challenging.

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  26. The biggest challenge I can think of at my school is parent involvement and compliance. I've seen parents start fights on local school Facebook pages or make inappropriate comments. Some parents take any issue they have to Facebook where they have an extremely large audience. That is not the example we want to set for kids especially with younger kids joining those websites. All the adults need to act as role models for these kids so they see what they should and shouldn't be doing.

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    1. Sometimes adults create more drama than the students. However, I've seen students use social media to bully other students, but if the parents were more of a role model, then this wouldn't be a problem.

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  27. I teach in a rural district but we are a 1:1 school and all of our students are issued iPads at the start of the year. However, I still find that many students do not have access to the internet or smart technology outside of school, therefore have very limited knowledge regarding HOW to use their iPads let alone how to use their digital space responsibility.

    On the other hand, the students who do have internet access at home (whether it’s through their phones or home computers) seem to have unfettered access without parental supervision. We had an issue in our district a few years back where middle school girls sent naked pictures to their boyfriends via text, who then posted them online. Those pictures have followed those girls into high school and will, unfortunately, continue to follow them into the workforce. We have no control over what happens at home. Obviously, parental education and involvement is a key part of this process but we’ve had a really difficult time with outreach within our district. It doesn’t seem like parents have the time, interest, or are completely unaware of our school’s attempts to provide technology forums for parents.

    Lastly, finding the time to teach ALL of these various topics regarding digital citizenship seems daunting when we already struggle to get through all of our content at a high school level. We really should be starting this educational process in middle school if not elementary school and maybe assign different topics that are appropriate per grade level. Having an overall plan throughout the district and grade levels would help to ensure consistent growth and avoid the negative consequences of misuse without burdening ONE building or teacher.

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    1. Yes, this is a great point that it seems to be either one extreme or the other-- either limited knowledge and no internet access or unfettered access. I am also at a rural 1:1 district. I think the unfettered access will be a bigger problem as time continues to go on. At one point it felt like one of the first vocabulary items my newcomer English learners mastered was "proxy server." Sigh. I am sad to hear about the girls who will have those pictures follow them. I know things like that keep happening, even though our students have lots of examples of the consequences.

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  28. I think the biggest hurdle in my community is the lack of parents having access to technology that the students in the schools are using.
    This leaves the students without any help at home when it comes to technology and being a good digital citizen. I think this technology process will still need years before it becomes common place and students learn from home as well as the schools. I see this as a big hurdle that many districts are probably struggling with as the implement technology and being a good digital citizen.

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    1. I agree. Up until two or three years ago, my kids' dad didn't have a computer in the house or Internet. It sounds like he does now, but he doesn't have any idea about technology. I can only imagine how many more parents are like that. I enjoy technology and love using it as a way to get students to learn as long as it's done responsibly.

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  29. During the 2015-2016 school year, I started working with my reading groups in Google Classroom. They were posting comments to each other and completing assignments online. I had difficulty getting some of them to understand that even if they delete a comment, it is still out there on the internet. I showed them how I receive emails with their comments in them, and explained that I could easily pass those onto someone else, even though they think they've gotten rid of the offensive comments. The biggest problem I think I will continue to face this year is getting the students to really think about what they're going to post on-line before they make their post. I think they are still too young to truly understand how their current digital usage could affect their futures.

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    1. Kelly, my stepson had to learn this lesson the hard way. He thought that what he posted in a chat room went away once he signed off. He said something inappropriate to a fellow student, and her parents were not amused. They were able to find the chats with just a few clicks, and my stepson had a lot of explaining to do to the dean. This is a huge issue that kids just don't get.

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  30. I love the post about teaching a teenager about driving. I often think of digital citizenship as the ABCs for kindergarten students. My little guy started kindergarten today, and he knows his ABCs, but I am relying on his wonderful teacher to get him to read this year (We'd fight every day if I did it!) because she is trained for specifically this task. Our students come to us knowing the very basics of digital citizenship from what is modeled at home. It is our job to expand and teach them more.

    As with learning to read, close connections with home only enhance what is learned in the classroom. I think a critical first step in opening the lines of communication. Can we give conversation starters to parents? Or prompt our kids to ask their parents questions as homework? I know one of my goals for this year to give more topics for conversation to be had at home!

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  31. My perspective is different, since the kids I work with have been arrested for something, but my concerns and challenges are similar to the rest of you. I don't just talk about digital citizenship with the kids who have been charged with an offense related to using technology. It's something I talk about with almost all of my clients, since so many of them have smart phones and other tools that they use to access social media. Most of the parents are not aware of what these kids access on those phones.

    One of the challenges I face is getting the parents to be more proactive in monitoring the usage of those devices. Some parents are so naive about technology that they don't realize what is out there, and what apps are being used by the kids. This morning, I met with a new client and her mother. The parents are trying to raise children who are pro-social, and are very involved in their church. The daughter had a cell phone, and the parents weren't worried, because they monitored her usage and apps. They didn't realize that the "innocent" little game of Clash of Clans that she played on the phone had a chat function. The young lady started talking to a guy using the chat function. After a few months of chatting through the game, he came to Indiana from Wisconsin to visit the girl. After all those months of chatting, they were "in love," and she ran away to be with him. The parents never considered this possibility since she was just playing a game on her phone, not doing anything that was dangerous, they thought.


    Another challenge is that some of my parents are so caught up in their own lives and activities that they don't care what the kids are into.

    We have some families that have both the parents and their children involved in the justice system, either at the same or different times, and in some cases, the grandparents are or were involved in the justice system. It's a challenge to get some families to be aware of pro-social norms, and to realize that, even though it's normal for them to do some things, it's not appropriate or healthy.

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    1. Constance, what a valuable post! You are so right! Even teachers and administrators can fall into the trap of giving students time in study halls and homerooms and we like to think the students are using their laptops and/or phones for productive purposes, but sometimes that is not at all true. Truthfully, most teachers are too busy in the first place, and monitoring students' devices is yet another time-consuming task. At least our technology team catches the worst offenders, but that is only the tip of the iceberg. I suspect parents also feel busy and overwhelmed or lack the access and ability to monitor their kids' devices. You bring up real problems that educators and parents need to address. This was a big issue for parents who opposed our corporation going 1:1 four years ago. Now it seems that we too often leave this issue to chance, hoping our students or kids know better and won't use devices inappropriately. Your last sentence is so important. Kids really do watch and learn from the adults around them.

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  32. The biggest challenge to a community based approach is parental opposition to use of social media (and in some cases all technology) in the schools. Generally this has been a representation of a few vocal parents going to the school board to argue that their students will be exposed to images and information that they consider inappropriate for their children. There are others who think that what students do on social media must not have educational value. While I live and teach in a rather conservative-minded community, all of these fears need to be considered when students have not had training in digital literacy, and in the early stages (five years ago) when our district adapted 1:1 devices, some of the parental fears may have revealed some true gaps in digital literacy. Communication remains the best way to allay fears,in particular, communication of what our school has planned for digital literacy. I appreciated that Bearden’s acknowledgement of this:
    "The best tool that educators and parents have is open and honest communication with students about the realities of their online lives," (p. 19). SAGE Publications. Kindle Edition.

    Most parents are learning right along with their children about technology. I know I am. Fear of the unknown is often an obstacle that generates animosity about an issue before the benefits are revealed.

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    1. Tammy, as I read your post I could picture some of the issues we faced going to 1:1 devices in my mind. So much emphasis has been placed on teachers going without a textbook and finding free resources online that digital citizenship has not been adequately addressed in our corporation. I'm a little surprised that it hasn't been a bigger focus for our corporation, but it seems that this is another item left for individual teachers to address. Some do; some do not. The quotation you included in your post is so important.

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    2. Tammy,
      I also appreciated the discussion on parental education. "Many parents are aware of the gaps in their own knowledge (even if they don't specifically know what these gaps are) and are grateful to get information that helps them be better parents and digital citizens themselves" (P17). I would love to see the school/community offer workshops for all stakeholders. There is a need and desire.

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  33. The biggest problem in implementing a community-based approach to digital citizenship is time and a lack of a defined approach in teaching digital citizenship. Who should organize this community-based effort? The Superintendent? The Curriculum Director? The Principal? The Teachers? When it is left to chance, it falls through the cracks. Some parents make an effort, individually, with their own children, and I applaud them for doing so. Without a defined approach, sometimes employees in the school district have different opinions about what is acceptable and what is not. Teachers are already stretched to the limit with responsibilities. I think an administrator has to make this a district-wide or school-wide focus. The administrator cannot do it alone, but needs to guide the community-based approach. Getting parents to buy in must include having an open and trustworthy rapport with the parents and adults of the community for this effort to be successful. Even with such a relationship, it will be difficult to gain adults' participation because most are so busy, but without that type of rapport with the adults, there will not be any meaningful participation.

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    1. Michelle-I love your comment about how employees have different opinions; one of the best teachers I know refuses to use Instagram as she jokingly says "I'm too old for that, I wouldn't know what to do with it!". Yet, Instagram is where I have found some of the most fantastic ideas to implement in my classroom as well as opportunities for my class to connect with others from all around the United States.

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    2. Michelle, I am hopeful that the new Indiana Department of Education Science and Computer Science standards will help to alleviate these problems. They should establish a framework for collaborative efforts within school systems. Administrator webinars are coming this September, and they will be followed up with broader training for educators. Today, we may feel as if we are behind the eight ball; however, I strongly believe the winds of change are blowing.

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  34. In my school, we have a (small) percentage of Amish students whose parents allow them to use the technology, but encourage us to allow those children to do the work in a different approach as well. Therefore, these students are not taught any additional digital citizenship other than what they receive from their classroom teacher(s) and our "tech time" special they have once a week. We also have a majority of our population who do not have internet access at home. Their parents use their cell phone data plan as a cheaper allernative to having another bill to pay. While we have a fantasic public library that the students have access to, living out in the country makes it harder for students to get there (especially in bad weather).
    I loved this chapter! It had my brain just switched on and the ideas flowing on how to utalize social media TOGETHER in my classroom!

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  35. The biggest struggles I have seen with implementing digital citizenship is the wide variety of expectations. Schools, parents, local libraries and coffee shops all offer access to the tech world but they all have different rules. I am not sure that we are ever going to solve this issue. I think there will always be different expectations in different settings. Teaching students to understand that there are expectations and rules is important. Students often struggle to identify which rules they should follow at which time. The "flaming text wars" mentioned in the chapter are a real thing. It is easy to plagiarize homework and get distracted from homework by using social media. I liked the focus on teaching conflict resolution skills and understanding what your digital footprint looks like. These are great topics to bring up with students of every age.

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  36. Our school district has 50% of the students on free and reduced lunches so many of them don't have Internet at home. With our high school going 1:1 at the start of the year and then adding the middle school later in the year, I wonder how many students will have problems doing homework. I have heard students say that the only way they can access Internet is on their phones and that they don't always have data because the parents can't afford to keep buying the cards. I already see students hiding their phones during class surfing on the Internet or looking at social media so I wonder what they will do with the Chromebooks they will now have. Will they be more responsible with them?

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    1. Michele, our school is in a similar situation. We have a high percentage of students on free and reduced lunches. There is talk in the district of trending toward a blended format in our classes. Students with technology at home are going to be at a distinct advantage in such a format. Sure, all students can Snapchat, Tweet, and catch Pokemon. However, when it comes to using a word processing program, spreadsheet, etc., the students who have computers with high speed internet access will be able to progress academically at a much faster rate than the students without similar access.

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  37. I feel that some of the biggest challenges we face are:
    1. Parents' access to technology/internet at home
    2. Time
    3. Knowledge of digital citizenship
    4. Expectations
    Working with Chromebooks a lot this year opened my eyes to how naive my students were about this topic. As the year progressed and we delved more into digital citizenship, many students began to take the topic more seriously. Unfortunately, what we enforced in school was not always carried out at home due to one or more of the above reasons.
    I believe if we truly want our kids to be good digital citizens, then everyone involved in their education must be trained in what it's all about. We should all have similar expectations and be expected to model these expectations.
    There are so many other comments I can make about a community-based approach, but I would be repetitious of the comments that have preceded me.
    This chapter, I'm sure, will be a hot topic of discussion among districts this year.

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    1. We also have Chromebooks, and I definitely see and agree with all of your points here! It's imperative to get everyone on board, and to have a set of universal expectations, aiding in at least some of these areas. I also mentioned that #1 was the primary difficulty in our area with sharing all of the resources. It's going to be a constant battle this year, but we persevere!

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  38. I feel that we face 3 major issues with digital citizenship in our community. The first is the lack of internet availability. Not all students and families have internet access at home. This limits the ability for students to do work at home and to share in the digital experience with his or her parents. Secondly, there are many parents who are not educated about digital citizenship. Many parents do not realize the scope and dangers. They do not monitor their children and then are upset when something 'bad' is posted or searched. Parents can act outraged when the school contacts them about inappropriate student computer usage. In my experience, a large percentage of the inappropriate use occurs at home and the parents have no idea. Third, unfortunately, we have the disengaged parents that just do not care. They either want the school to control the computers or use the computers as babysitters in the home. These parents often do not even care if their student gets into trouble or uses computer access. All three of these concepts are serious issues that face our school community.

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    1. I agree on all counts, Quinn. You really set it out succinctly. It seems like we have had an ebb and flow of these problems over the years of being 1:1.

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  39. I think the biggest challenge our school faces is the lack of time available for such instruction. Teachers hands are tied now with their block scheduling and making sure they hit the standards that will be seen on the state test. Being the Media Specialist, it is my job to ensure that Digital Citizenship is introduced to the students. I will make sure that happens, but I only see students for 40 minutes each week and some classes I will not see until the second semester begins.

    In my "perfect world" teachers would also take ownership of scaffolding what I teach the children. I would love to see that when a question, or problem arises; a teachable moment would occur. That way, students would get on the spot instruction rather than having to wait until they see me and it can be discussed.
    My fear is that teachers would not utilize that teachable moment. Too many times they are so focused on the intruction of getting thorugh the grade level standards that they cringe at the thought of going off course.

    I also feel that many of my teachers lack the knowledge of Digital CItizenship and so it scares them to have to introduce it to their students. It is my goal this year to get those teachers to feel comfortable about talking about it and being role models for their students.

    As the book says, It takes a village!!!!

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  40. One of the biggest challenges I face for my building would be time. I need more time to develop a game plan, and I’ll also need others to dedicate their time to finalize the plan and put it into action. Another challenge would be getting people on board and getting them to see this as more than just one more thing they have to do when their plates are already full. The biggest challenge for my district would probably be our size. We’re a large district, so it can be hard to get everyone on the same page, but it could also help guide and motivate people to get on board if we had a district initiative.

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    1. I agree that time can be a big thing for many districts. It seems that more so than not, we have to hurry up and put things together. Instead of being able to fully think it through.

      Getting everyone on the same page is what I believe to be tough. I do think if our school was able to agree on a few key points the students would benefit so much. Just like memorizing the school pledge.

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    2. JoyAnn I couldn't agree with you more. It is like you are in my building. We fall into a routine and don't want to change. We have to realize technology is an ever changing trend and we have to change and adapt with it.

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  41. Our school will be going to 1:1 this school year and students will receive IPads. They will be offered a workshop for parents at our Back To School Night. I feel that our biggest challenges will be teaching students to accept their own responsibility and parents need to monitor what they children are doing at home. This becomes a challenge when many parents are working and have tight schedules at home. I am concerned that my 4th graders will get into websites that may be inappropriate or type comments that may be hurtful to other people. This will be a process we will have to work on throughout the year and their school career. I think teachers need some more inservice time on this topic. Sometimes I feel like we are being thrown into it. It is scary for many teachers(especially when many students seem to know more about technology that we do). Time would also be a challenge. I agree that working together in our community on this will make things go much smoother and it is important to students to use technology to be productive in the 21st century.

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  42. I perceive the biggest challenge facing my school when implementing a community-based approach to digital citizenship is getting everyone on the same page at the same time.

    In our building we still have teachers that are very hesitant to use technology at all, we have others who use technology with proficiency and wouldn’t blink an eye. We have many families without internet access. Parents, Teachers, and Administrators may not agree on what guidelines or expectations are reasonable.

    The second issue I perceive is convincing parents of the importance of being a good digital citizen. I think back to last school year, one family came in for parent teacher conferences. Their 3 year old was on a device with internet access. The child was playing games and an inappropriate in game ad popped up, he asked for help but they just dismissed him not wanting to get interrupted while we were conferring about the big brother (5). There needed to be some kind of restriction or block or only a kid friendly game/app. Manufactures are not in charge of keeping the kids safe from this, parents are….. WE are!
    MORE supervision and understanding or the importance of how our digital footprint follows us.

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  43. One big challenge has been different home rules about Internet usage. For some students it's an unsupervised wild wild west. I also have multiple students who are not allowed to have any social media presence, or do not have any Internet access at all. I would hate for students and parents to miss out on meaningful content because they do not have Internet access.
    Another potential problem is creating a digital space to model appropriate digital citizenship. The school social media accounts I've seen have sometimes been lacking in interactivity or in fostering a community. An active online school community first needs to be established to help in getting digital citizenship information can get out. I would love for a space to be made for parents and students to share community issues and concerns they see on the subject. The way students are using the Internet is going to differ community to community. Therefore, digital citizenship needs to be a conversation with parents and students, not just a school providing resources to parents.

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    1. You bring up a good point about the lack of good examples on school social media accounts, especially where Twitter is concerned. The buildings in our district do a better job with Facebook although most of the posts are made by a handful of staff members. One obstacle in our district is the lack of social site access on school owned devices due to filters during the school day. This is to prevent student misuse, however, your thought about fostering appropriate examples doesn't have much of a chance in that climate. We have a lot of PD about sharing our story, yet I sometimes have to wait until I am at home to do this; by that time the story has lost some of its pizazz and so have I.

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  44. I think that fear makes all of this digital citizenship difficult. As a parent of middle school and high school children and a 6th grade parent, I get to see a wide range of what is permissible in the homes. Some children are very knowledgeable. Others are not permitted to use any form of social media. Many times parents and schools do not allow the use of devices out of fear of what could happen. I like what the author brought out on page 15 about missing out on teaching students because we are afraid for them to use something. Fear stops many good intents often because we as teachers are venturing into a world we know is here to stay but wasn't here when we were students (for many of us anyway)or as we were going through our teaching training.

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  45. I believe the biggest challenge in teaching digital citizenship is that for some students and schools, they may be teaching it too late. Though the adage, "Better late than never," is certainly true, the challenge still stands. For some students, they will be learning about digital citizenship for the first time in middle school or high school when they receive their school laptop. But will those lessons negate years of being able to peruse the internet freely? And speak their mind freely on the internet? Its good for younger students who are learning about this is elementary school as they learn technology, but I think there will be a number of students who will miss the digital citizenship message because, through not fault of their own, or really anyone since this is a relatively new field, they were never taught the proper etiquette for technology and the internet.
    I find think this ties in when Bearden was pointing out that not all parents and even teachers use proper digital citizenship and sometimes use the internet, especially the comment section, in a negative manner. For the generation of students introduced to digital citizenship too late, this negative behavior may be a more impressive lesson than anything we do on citizenship in school.
    That being said, this is merely a challenge, and does not mean defeat. We should still teach digital citizenship throughout all grades through the course of school, while understanding, and perhaps undermining, the negative lessons that students have already learned.

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  46. I think there are two significant challenges when implementing a community-based approach to teaching digital citizenship. The largest would probably be getting everyone on the same page - administrators, students, and parents. We all have different rules, morals, and ideas of what being a "good citizen" looks like. There would have to be detailed guidelines sent to parents and students to set up expectations, and educators would need to set the example. The other challenge that I can foresee would be the time commitment to implement a program of such magnitude...regardless of the great importance. The program needs to be well thought out and planned prior to implementation.

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    1. I think getting everyone on the same page would be very difficult. I sometimes feel it's hard to get my grade level on the same page let alone a whole school district.

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    2. Oohhh yah, that's a good point. It is difficult but if you are 1:1, it does become a whole district goal/concern.

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  47. I'm not sure what our biggest problem would be. Sometimes I feel that both Administration and parents don't see a problem with digital citizenship. Even though I am in a rather small school, I think an agreement on what digital citizenship looks like what also be a big issue. We are at a k through 12 School and what digital Citizenship looks like in kindergarten is very different from what digital citizenship looks like in 9th grade. I also think implementing it consistently would be difficult for our school. However in my division teachers do a really good job of making sure the students no the expectation when it comes to working on iPads or other devices. Our technology Specialists even has our fourth graders go through a course on digital citizenship that in the end they get their internet driver's license. Consistency through divisions and even classroom to classroom would be our biggest issue.

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  48. I agree with several of the comments above that parents are a crucial part of the kiddos in the social media. They model as well as we model, these may be different views, we can only do our best to show them our best. Our access to Internet has been helped with families by giving access on a snow day by opening or showing available sites to use the Internet if necessary. Kids can go to the library or a restaurant to get access. We also make sure that plans are accessible without Internet and can then sync up when they arrive back to school.
    I think showing our students that being in the social media is both positive to learn but does have reasons you need to be cautious is our job. Model model model is how we accomplish that.

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    1. Absolutely! I would venture to say that many people forget just how much students absorb from our own behaviors, as educators. The more cautious we are, the more they will pick up on some of those behaviors!

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  50. It is a difficult balance between giving parents and students all the information at one time or giving them smaller pieces throughout the school year to keep the awareness and discussion ongoing.

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  51. I think it is important for everyone to include discussions about Digital Citizenship in their classrooms. When talking to elementary students about Stranger Danger include that online portion. Discussions about bullying should include the Cyber portion. Students know and understand the dangers of interactions with an unknown person but cannot connect that on the other side of a computer screen there is a person.

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    1. I agree with what you said about them not connecting the person to the other side of the screen. It needs to be covered very early on in school. Adding it to other lessons like you suggested is a great idea.

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  52. I think that there are many challenges implementing a community-based approach to digital citizenship in our school. Getting everyone on the same page would be a major challenge. Parents, students, teachers and administrators need to have a solid knowledge base in order to implement digital citizenship. There are significant gaps in knowledge and how comfortable everyone is with technology. Closing the gap is an important place to start.

    Additionally, device availability can be an issue as well. Our district is going to 1:1 technology this fall. Students will have devices but not necessarily use of the web at home.

    I think that there should be some sort of curriculum that can be taught throughout the grade levels. If everyone can get on the same page with a curriculum in the building, it would be easier to get parents on board and more familiar with what digital citizenship means in our building.

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  53. One challenge in implementing a community-based approach to digital citizenship in my school has been parents not having internet access and /or devices at home. Many parents seem to be somewhat ignorant about digital citizenship. Some of the parents don’t talk to their children to reiterate what we teach their children about digital citizenship. Some children are unsupervised when using the internet at home and I feel this needs to change.
    Another challenge that I have seen has been some of the older teachers being reluctant in using technology. I have heard some say they aren’t going to use it or they don’t use it like they should be. I have seen some older teachers have the mindset that they are so close to retirement that they are simply not going to implement technology into their teaching. I think it’s that they don’t understand the ever changing world of technology.
    A few other challenges at the district level have been web filtering that blocks some educational sites. Too often our school has issues with the internet not working.

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  54. The more people involved in digital citizenship literacy, the more likely everyone will catch on to what it all means and what is appropriate. Right now challenges include parent participation and training opportunities for staff, students, and parents (well, everyone). Sometimes the topic seems so big. I wouldn’t know where to start if I were trying to implement a program in my community. Someone here said, there is “a huge disparity in comfort levels” in technology usage. I agree completely. How do we all “get on the same page”? We all need to know the same jargon. We need to know what the rules are, what to look for, and how serious the situation can be. Then there’s always the problem of time. As a teacher I feel that so much has changed so fast. There is so much to learn, which is always a challenge. I think the best thing we can do is model good digital citizenship. We need to know what that means. A one or two hour program is not enough. How do we weave good digital citizenship into the fabric of our schools and communities?

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  55. In my school, I see a lack of teaching about digital citizenship as one of the biggest challenges. As many of you have stated, students are seen as ones who already have the knowledge to use technology. However, they do not always have the knowledge to know how to use technology safely. They see it as a fun, cool way to participate in school and this sometimes leads to unsafe usage. Many students know too much when it comes to using technology. They have had countless hours at home exploring and experimenting with technology. I feel another challenge is parents are not always aware of what their children are doing with the technology they have access to. Schools need to have more frequent digital citizenship programs/informational sessions in order for students, parents, and school staff to be aware of safe practices. They also need to remain updated on current practices and procedures for remaining safe when it comes to the use of technology.

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    1. I completely agree with you. I think that as adults a lot of us are in the dark about all that our kiddos are doing and are exposed to. I know that I would benefit from some type of education on what apps/games/sites that kids are into these days. A few months back my nephews were visiting and one said,"man, I'm so bored. I wish someone would Kik me". I looked at him like he was crazy. He laughed and then explained to me that Kik is like a texting app. I definitely felt out of the loop.

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    2. I so agree with you that not only do we need to work with our students about safety with technology but also the parents. Remember when the computer was HUGE and kept in an open area so everyone could use it? Now you can get it through your tv and lots of children have tv' in their rooms, ipads, ipods, kindles and the list continues! We have to monitor and educate our students and parents.

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  56. As I regroup from my first day of classes, where I spent nearly all day trying to troubleshoot Chromebook issues, I can think of many challenges to having a successful community/school wide digital citizenship initiative. I agree with many of the previous posts in that things like parent support, student access and student adherence to the “rules” of digital citizenship are challenges, but ultimately, we have no power over what goes on outside our school doors.

    If we focus on the time/place we have the greatest chance to impact our students, there are still many challenges. First, there are only so many hours the day and teachers have to prioritize how they spend those hours. With a focus on state and corporation mandated testing/pre-testing/post-testing and re-testing (did I mention testing:), meeting all the state standards, using all the new technology available through our 1:1 initiative, making their classes engaging and differentiating so that they meet the needs of all students, many times teachers see digital citizenship as just one more thing they have to fit in. While most see the need to include digital citizenship, they just can't justify sacrificing something else for it.

    Second, as I mentioned in my first post, everyone assumes that “someone else” is teaching digital citizenship, while no one is actually doing more than mentioning it as a side note.

    Third, we need buy in from everyone. Without it being a school wide priority, then the DigCit initiative will never have a chance.

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    1. Angela, I agree that there needs to be intention when it comes to teaching digital citizenship. Imagine a "go-to guru" in the building who is able to implement the digital citizenship curriculum--a guru who does not practice in a silo. The guru would be allowed and able to empower the staff with the D.C. curriculum, so that it is woven into the fabric of all coursework in the school. Also, the curriculum would not be set in stone. As technology changes, so would the curriculum. We need to be as fluid and flexible in our DC as the technology the students will be using.

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    2. Jean...I would love to be that "go to Guru" for our school, but it takes buy in from everyone to make this work. If everyone isn't on the same page, the guru's information is never dispersed.

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    3. Many teachers I know believe that parents teach digital safety. But I find the greater percentage of students do not know what digital safety is. Or even how to determine what are the best sites that give correct facts. So it becomes my first job is to determine what they know and plan from there. Also, making sure that all equipment is ready to start at the beginning of the year. But as we all know computers are unpredictable and needs to be pampered to work.

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  57. I think that the author calls for a community approach to digital citizenship for a few reasons.

    To borrow a phrase from Hillary Clinton, "it takes a village" to raise a child. We do not raise children in a vacuum. We bring our little bundles of joy home from the hospital, and for a few weeks they are cocooned with us in our safe little nest. But we soon realize that we cannot raise our children alone. Today, raising a child means that both parents need to work in order to support their children. This means that other caregivers will have influence over them.

    Like it or not, our children are exposed to media and the internet very quickly in their young lives. We need to ensure that the caregivers that are helping us in the raising of our children share the same principles and rules regarding the consumption of media and the usage of internet and social media.

    Another way that this community can help as we raise our digital citizens is in the fact that change in the internet and social media is swift. Our young charges will know about the newest and latest available in cyberspace technology and applications before we can even turn our heads. We need to rely on teachers, experts, and other parents/guardians for their knowledge in these changes, especially if we are not particularly sophisticated in technology.

    We also can help each other to be the eyes and ears for each other. If we know another parent's child may be using technology in an unsafe or unhealthy way, we need to have the back of our fellow parents and inform the them about this unsafe use.

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  58. Week 2:
    "What do you perceive as the biggest challenges you face in implementing a community-based approach to digital citizenship in your school or district?"
    The biggest problem I face in implementing a community based approach to digital citizenship would be knowing where exactly to start. I agree that this is something that we need to work together with both the students and the parents to get results. I also believe that this is not a short 1 lesson type of thing. This needs to be an ongoing conversation and one that we work in often. I also like the idea of having the kids suggest examples of good/responsible digital citizenship look like and likewise, what poor/irresponsible digital citizenship would look like.

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  59. I feel for my students (primary elementary) that the majority of parents are very hands on with their children. The biggest challenge is know where to begin and what are the boundaries of school/home. Where does the responsibilities begin and end for schools? We are too comfortable with technology, children have their own phones/ipods/kindles at a younger and younger age. This program is not a once a year, check it off and move on when completed type program. Advances in technological development are too fast.

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  60. My biggest problem is finding out where my students stand on computer safety and if they can navigate the technology highway correctly. My school does not have a one to one system for technology or a full time computer teacher. I have found a few programs that teach computer safety and plan to teach at least one lesson per week. Hopefully, the students will learn computer safety and navigate safely over the internet.

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  61. With teaching digital citizenship, I think the greatest challenges ahead of my students will be the lack of outside resources, and inconsistent use of digital resources in school. Even though I fully intend on pushing digital citizenship, many other educators do not use the resources provided, and leave massive gaps in students' development. With the lack of resources, accommodations can be made, but it's the second hurdle that is the most difficult.

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  62. I have seen several schools struggle moving beyond cyberbulling when addressing digcit. I do understand why some administrators focus on this, but digcit is a much more dynamic topic.

    Another challenge we face is that educators aren't always equipped to integrate digcit. We need to start by supporting our teachers in this, first.

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  63. I often see disparity in the expectations we give our students in relation to protecting and respecting intellectual property.

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  64. I agree with the many others who cite differing levels of internet availability and parent knowledge/comfort at home. Even though we are an iPad school and have been for several years, we still have about 10% of homes with no internet. Some parents are resistant to the idea of anything digital. Others, while open to new ideas and technology, don't have the knowledge/time/desire to become more involved digitally.

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  65. Being an elementary teacher, I feel the biggest challenge is getting the parents on board with the need for teaching families digital citizenship at the elementary level. Most don't come for other meetings about testing or other events, so it would take some thinking on how to get them to come and see the need. I think most would think their child is too young to need to learn about digital citizenship, although we have had many of our students using social media sites. I think starting with small steps at school, like Kris Taylor suggested In her post above, would be a good start and then adding those lessons in newsletters might get the parents on board.

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  66. I think the biggest challenge is knowing how to communicate with all of the parties that would need to be part of a community effort and getting them on board with educating about digital citizenship and that we all be teaching the same thing. I teach at the high school level, so we definitely know the need for digital citizenship. We have our students complete a short online course in order to get more computer access to sites such as youtube. But as a teacher I don't feel like I do enough to emphasize this. So I'm in the boat of needing to be educated on how to do it better!

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  67. The biggest challenge for me is building from the ground up. Teaching kindergarten, I am the foundation for the rest of their future. This includes within the school and outside of school. We get students from all different kinds of environments and sometimes, we need to reteach the students the correct way. If I can start small and really hone in on digital citizenship, hopefully, this will then stick to make technology and social media easier and safer for them.

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  68. I feel the biggest challenge for me is to get them to understand the need for digital citizenship. By the time they reach me (high school), they have a pretty big digital footprint, and some of them have been quite irresponsible with it. My husband is in higher education and sees this on a whole other level. I think trying to get my students (and often times, their parents) to see "big picture" and "long term" is very difficult and requires unique strategies.

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  69. Hands down, the biggest challenge I face is time. Students, parents and stakeholders in my school are, for the most part, really ready to learn and interested in what teachers have to say. However, planning and implementation take time. I feel that many teachers are stretched too thinly. Although this is such a relevant topic, at this stage, I wouldn't know where to start.

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  70. Resources, resources, resources by far is the biggest challenge for a digital community in my classroom. We have six computers that we share in our rotation times which works, but it would be nice to have a class set to implement it more. Then outside of school the students usually do not have the resources needed to continue anything digitally. Some have cell phones but no data. They do not have parents who will take them to the library. I just have to find a way to make this important to all parties concerned!

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  71. I'm a little behind in my response, but I agree completely with the other postings about the greatest challenge would be getting everyone on the same page. We would have the technology at our school since most classrooms are 1:1, but I think making the students aware that the internet and its pros and cons are far reaching would be a challenge. There are a lot of students who don't realize that everything they put out there will stay out there and that colleges look at their social media postings. I think getting the parents involved would be a challenge due to time and interest. I can see many parents thinking teaching digital citizenship is the responsibility of the schools and therefore not play a part. Other parents may not see it as important and won't participate in a community based approached. Another challenge at the school level would be what grade level do you begin teaching digital citizenship and how do you agree where to start. Obviously, this is something that should begin at the grade school level and progress through high school since all students k-12 are more tech savvy than some teachers and parents.

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  72. Our school is just like other schools, we face knowing how to educate our community. We would like to have parent nights and community information meetings, but it is so hard for people to come in and listen. I think we are going to have to be creative and go to them. We are living in such a busy society and I think people want to know, but aren't sure how to get the information.

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  73. I really like the idea of introducing some type of digital citizenship at our yearly open house. However, the main problem is that only a small percentage of parents come to the open house. The challenge would be how to get the information out to the majority of the parents in our school corporation and my school specifically. Another challenge I see is the difference in what some parents see as OK for their children, while others see the same issue as a real concerned.

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  74. One of the issues I see is that many people are unaware of what "digital citizenship" really means. I would love to have a program where parents could come in and learn about the topic.

    I know that our school corporation is incorporating a Digital Citizenship class at the middle school level this year. I have yet to look over the lessons that have been created, as it is an online course that students will take. However, I firmly believe that the more information students and parents have about this, the better off everyone will be.

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  75. There are a couple of issues I see with digital citizenship. First, many teachers and parents are not on the same track. Some parent/teachers fail to properly coach students when it comes to the digital world, or even address areas of concern. Others may completely neglect using teachable experiences. Second, some students do not have access to the internet at home, and one of my students is not allowed to use it at school, per parent request (High school). Third, many students are unable to self monitor sustained productive use of the internet. Finally, there is a huge breakdown in communication. As a teacher I email the address on file, but it does not guarantee the parent will read my email. If I send something home with the student, the item will be forgotten about or discarded. Often parents don't understand because they are only getting information from the students.

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  76. The biggest challenges you face in implementing a community-based approach to digital citizenship in my school or district is two-fold.

    Firstly, educating our staff to become knowledgeable in the area of digital citizenship must to happen so that we are all clear about what we are really talking about.

    Secondly, overcoming the sentiment that "I just cannot handle one more thing" is key. Teachers today are increasingly overwhelmed with a myriad of "add-ons" to their main mission with their students today.

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  77. The biggest challenges you face in implementing a community-based approach to digital citizenship in my school or district is two-fold.

    Firstly, educating our staff to become knowledgeable in the area of digital citizenship must to happen so that we are all clear about what we are really talking about.

    Secondly, overcoming the sentiment that "I just cannot handle one more thing" is key. Teachers today are increasingly overwhelmed with a myriad of "add-ons" to their main mission with their students today.

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  78. the biggest problem I see with getting the community on board with digital citizenship is the number of parents that believe it is ok to "air dirty laundry" on social media. We are trying to teach the kids this is not the avenue to do such things and yet the parents are leading by the other example

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    1. I agree about parents not always modeling well. It is very disappointing to see how people amuse themselves or emotionally dump with online tools. It is easy for children to see those things and be hurt by them and pattern their behavior after them. Technology is like money in that it is an amplifier. It can amplify what is good and what is not good in people. When I talk to parents about this, I draw on examples with my own children. I say, "My daughters and I have an agreement that we don't post embarrassing or negative picture or stories about each other on social media and wow am I glad we agreed to that because . . ." and then I tell a funny story about something. Sometimes it helps. Often it doesn't, but I believe if we all keep pushing that message it will make a difference.

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  79. I think that one of the greatest challenges to a community-based approach to digital citizenship is making sure that the same practices implemented and taught at school are also followed through at home. I believe that far too many kids have too much freedom when it comes to online activity. In order to fully implement a program that is going to be successful, then the standards need to be met when school is no longer in session. It would be a challenge, but it would be so worthwhile if all parents, or the majority anyways, were willing to take the program seriously and make changes at home too.

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  80. One big problem that I notice is that students can often understand the digital citizenship aspect of school but because it is unconnected to learning about digital citizenship at home, they do not understand that these same concepts and ideas should be put into practice at home or outside of the school. In addition to that, all the stakeholders need to buy in to the idea of digital citizenship.

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  81. I've read that many of you included limited and/or ineffective parental involvement as a big challenge, and you are also worried about asking teachers to do one more thing. Those ideas seem daunting. I agree. Even though many of us and most of our students have been using technology for awhile, these discussions about the importance of digital citizenship are really just starting to gain traction. I know it will take quite a bit of time sharing out a consistent message over and over and over again in many different ways before we make meaningful progress. I think about the importance of parents reading to their children. We have known for a long time that this is critically important to children. We've been sharing that message out and supporting it in creative ways for a long time. We still have children who have very little experience with books before starting in school and do not read much outside of classroom assignments. That can feel discouraging, but there are more and more parents who are getting the message. That is hopeful and highly significant for those children. In many ways we are all just getting started with digital citizenship, but if we address this aggressively, we can meaningfully help students now, and when they have their own children, they can help us with that next generation too.I'm so grateful we are getting partners in this process too. We don't have to do this alone.

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  82. The first challenge I find in implementing a community-based approach to digital citizenship is having internet access. Many of my students come from families that can't afford to have internet. The second challenge would be making sure this is being implemented at home. What they learn at school they also need to use at home. I know from experience students can use the internet, but they don't know how to use it correctly. With this starting and the building of partnership between home and school it will benefit all students.

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  83. My school is a one-to-one school and each student has access to a Macbook day and night. The students can contact teachers via email and check their grades on-line. Most of our teachers use a learning management system to help students keep up with class work. We also have a Facebook page to inform parents and interested members of the community about events at our school. One of our ex-principals put it this way: "Someone is going to tell our story to the community and that should be you." We reach more community members and students this way than we ever did with paper notifications.

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  84. I suppose that the biggest challenge is that no matter how many places something is posted on social media there will always be someone who wants the information in another way.

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  85. I think it is so important to have a community based approach to digital citizenship. I can see where there may be challenges financially, Internet access etc. Even if that is limited in some areas, overall if possible it is always important to work as a team towards a common goal. This is beneficial for the students but also a learning opportunity for parents. I feel that many parents are naive to much of technology mostly due to the ever changing and increased accessibility of technology and information into how it all works. I understand parents are busy but especially for schools that are fortunate to be 1:1, requiring an informational night regarding digital citizenship should be required.

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