Monday, July 25, 2016

Digital Citizenship Week 1: Welcome and Chapter 1



Welcome to the Summer 2016 eLearning book club. We are looking forward to reading and discussing Susan Bearden's book, Digital Citizenship: A Community-Based Approach and to prepare for Digital Citizenship Week in September. The digital and paperback versions of this book can be purchased from Amazon. If you don't have the book yet, don't worry. You can jump into the conversation a little late if you need to. Just catch up as soon as you're able to.  

Here are some particulars to help you as you participate in the book club:

  • A prompt or question will be posted here in the blog every Monday morning. That blog post will also include the reading assignment for the following week.
  • To receive notifications when posts are made, click Join this site or Follow by email in the bar to the right.
  • Respond to our post and/or respond to a comment by another participant each week. The more interaction there is between participants, the richer and more beneficial the conversation will be.
  • In addition to the amazing connections and powerful learning of being in the book club, participants who make a meaningful contribution to every week's discussion will be awarded 14 PGPs. Additionally, we will award one professional development grant at the conclusion of the summer book club. Educators working in a public school who meaningfully participate in all seven weeks' conversations are eligible for the grant.
  • To register for the book club please complete this registration form. We are jumping right in to the discussion, so your first week's assignment is to introduce yourself in a comment to this blog post and also read chapter 1 and respond to this question: what would be the benefit to you and your students if you became more literate about digital citizenship? Just click the comments link below this post and enter your comment in the text box. You will need to be logged in using a Google account. In your introduction be sure to include your name, school and/or corporation, and what your role there is. (If you have any problems commenting, please email Meri Carnahan at carnahan@doe.in.gov.) 

217 comments:

  1. Greetings! My name is Allison Stanton, I currently work at Roosevelt Middle School (Twin Lakes School Corp.) and I teach 6th grade ELA. The benefits of implementing digital citizenship are endless, especially in today's world. We must always be alert, educated, and honest when it comes to the usage of technology. It is no longer simply a resource, it is a way of living and communicating with others. With this new transition comes great responsibility, and if students are on board with what being a good digital citizen means, the learning comes naturally. Using all of these truly outstanding resources for students is something that I hope to sort out and explore with them, all while teaching (and learning) with them that there is an entirely new world that exists at their fingertips, and it is imperative that they not only navigate, but master what that world is and what it can provide for them. Literacy is not just getting through the material, it's mastering it, and if we master digital citizenship... we've taken a huge step forward in becoming future friendly!

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    1. I like "alert, educated, and honest" as goals!

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    2. Yes, Allison. Technology is not going anywhere. We need to educate our students on best use procedures to give them safe access to the wonderful world of information.

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  3. Salutations!

    I currently serve in the Business Education Department at Greensburg Community High School. We, as a school, will be placing a greater emphasis on digital citizenship for all students. This book is my study guide to help make this happen. Being an exemplary digital citizen in a digital age is very important to our students and staff alike. I look forward to this journey not only for myself, but our entire school community.

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  4. Hello, I am beginning my 17th year teaching Computer Applications at Princeton Community Middle School in Southwest Indiana. I have been asked to teach a Digital Citizenship curriculum to my 6th grade students. I am a little overwhelmed at the thought of teaching this new curriculum as I am not sure I have the knowledge to teach it well. I look forward to learning from all the members of this group.

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    1. Sharla - Hello! I replied before but it doesn't seem to have taken - my apologies if somehow this appears twice. I wondered what curriculum you were using? We have used the commonsensemedia.org resources cited in the book. I don't think what I'm teaching is broad enough. I'm working with elementary kids, but I think they still need to be prepared for a lot of this. Did you or the district come up with the curriculum or are you getting it from somewhere else? Thanks!

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    3. Hello Elizabeth, Your reply is only showing up once. I have been told I am implementing Digital Citizenship into my 6th grade curriculum, there wasn't any discussion--I was told. My administration decided that we would use the Common Sense Media curriculum. Which I have heard is good, but they also want me to bring in speakers from our local police department. I have reservations about this because what I know of the speaker they are not a good role model for students and I am afraid they will be too harsh with my young students, who many of them at age 11 barely know how to use a computer nor do they have their own device. I am hoping through reading this book and being in this group I can become more comfortable with what I am teaching and where I am going.

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    4. Sharla - thanks for letting me know. I hope that the curriculum meets your needs. I used it for K-5th grade, so I don't know about anything above that, but would assume it would work ok. Good luck with the police dept speaker. I hope that he or she can moderate the tone to present information on an appropriate level for your students. Maybe if you give lots of hints about the audience....

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  5. Hi there! I am the Instructional Technology Coach at East Porter County School Corporation in Valparaiso/Kouts Indiana. I'm looking forward to reading this book to learn as much as I can to support teachers in integrating DigCit into all that we do.

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  6. My name is Jenni McCammon. I am a 2nd grade teacher at Pierceton Elementary/Whitko district. Getting a better understanding of how my students can use technology and my knowledge of how to use the technology will benefit all of us in the classroom. My students love to use their iPads to find answers and learn more, I want to be better prepared to guide them in the journey of learning how to find the information they want. I am excited about being better equipped in te digital world to help them make better choices as they learn.

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    1. Jenni - hello! are you a 1:1 school? My elementary school is getting some more devices for the children to use this year, and I'm excited by the possibilities although trying to figure out the logistics... We're getting some iPads, some Chromebooks, and another thing that I can't remember - will have to look up.

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  7. Hello my name is Nancy Batliner. I am beginning 29th year as an educator. I work for the School City of Hammond as the Media Specialist at Edison Elementary School.
    With technology becoming more prevalent in all realms of education, I believe it is imperative that we begin digital citizenship at an early age. To many times my thinking is let's wait until they are a little bit older, but truthfully by then they have picked up many bad habits about being digitally responsible that it is hard to break that habit.
    I am hoping that by participating in this book discussion I will gain knowledge that will not only benefit the students I service, but my colleagues as well. To become digitally aware, we need to be the role models.

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    1. Nancy - I agree that we need to start young! And, I would add, review often. I'm pretty sure I have several bad habits that I need to address.

      I think that the problem we may run into along the way is that, because this is all relatively new to our parents and our communities, there will be some push-me-pull-you in the area of, What needs to be covered by parents and what needs to be covered by the schools?

      I thought of that when reading in the book about the child's digital footprint starting before birth, with ultrasound pictures. When I worked for the public library, we ran into trouble time and again with parents who had used their children's library cards to check out materials, often DVDs and CDs, and not returned them. When the children began to use the library on their own, they had accrued hundreds of dollars in fines on their accounts that they had no knowledge of. This is obviously a negative example of affecting your child's record, in some sense, but it can happen online to a greater or lesser degree as well. Parents don't always exhibit as much care of their children's records as they should.

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    2. I agree Elizabeth. One of the biggest challenges I feel that elementary teachers and students run in to is copyrighting and pictures. So many times we just "google" something and then copy and paste away. The big problem I have is I only see my students once a week for 40 minutes. That time constraint is so hard because not only do I have to teach lessons, students have to check out books during that time as well. That's why it is so important for the teachers in my building to "help me help the students" by demonstrating the proper use of digital citizenship.

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    3. That's a challenge! It's easy to get in a hurry and right click - I think you're right that having other teachers demonstrate and confirm digital citizenship will help. My husband runs a web design business, and he runs into people fairly frequently who will find pictures elsewhere on the web and tell him to use those on their websites. Luckily he had a class in copyright in college! and deeply, deeply does not want to get sued. . . So this is a problem throughout society and with luck, getting the message to kids early and often will help adults later on.

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    4. I also have limited time with students. I am the technology integrationist for K-4 students and teachers. I plan to do some teacher training to help them teach students about digital citizenship while using iPads in their classrooms. I think getting. the classroom teachers onboard, is the way to go.

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    5. Good plan. I'm planning to talk up this book as a resource (once I've finished reading it), which I think is a good intro AND, at 55pp, short and not scary to read!

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  8. My name is Janet Bowen and I am a prekindergarten teacher at Jefferson elementary school in Hammond. My students are growing up with technology and have the ability to not stay on the learning apps I put them on. Some have downloaded other games and have taken "selfies" of themselves. I want to learn more about digital citizenship.

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    1. It is amazing how much these little ones already know! Getting to them early is a great idea. Good luck in this venture!

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    2. It is so important for us to start young. We think preschool may be too early, but those little guys know more than I do!!!

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    3. I am also a pre-K teacher! I have learned so much about apps for these kiddos...they amaze me at their young age with how much they currently know and how technology is already an important part of their little lives. Countless times I find myself asking them questions. As early educators we are building a strong foundation in digital citizenship! :)

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    4. They have no fear of messing up their device. It is so automatic for them.

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    5. It is not too early to begin teaching children safe use. They already know so much more than we do, and they are not afraid of clicking on anything!

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    6. I am a kinder teacher and my kids are so attuned to what they should be in and what they shouldn't be in when they are using the tablets or lap tops. It is amazing how they remember the rules with these pieces of technology.

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  9. I am a media specialist from Warren Township in Indianapolis. I really like the way Bearden lays things out in this chapter. Our students (and their parents) may have no idea that they are creating some life-long, irreversible digital impressions. I am sure that I will learn about (or become more cognizant) of some of the "hidden" practices of the Internet, such as data mining, the filter bubble, the vulnerability to being hacked, identity stolen, or being misrepresented.

    I look forward to investigating the many resources that accompany the book. Because I do incorporate digital literacy and digital citizenship into the library, I know that these resources will be very timely.

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    1. Are you elementary, middle, or high school?

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    2. I should have mentioned that: my building has a middle school on the first floor, intermediate on the second, grades 5-8 overall.

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    3. Yes, our students will be affected later on in life by the digital imprint they are creating today. Colleges are aware of this, and they are checking into applicants' digital posts.

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  10. Good afternoon! My name is Holly Summers and I am the Math teacher for 5/6 at Monroe Central Elementry in Parker City.

    I think a benefit would be that the digital literacy and citizenship are important real world skills that ALL students, parents and other stakeholders need today. Finding ways to incorporate real world skills into traditional academics is tough to balance sometimes.

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  11. Hello, I am the media specialist at Delta High School and I am extremely interested in this book discussion over digital citizenship. I dabbled in it some last year and I would really like to use it more this year to teach the students about the imprints they leave on social media. With cell phones being allowed at our school, there are so many blurred boundaries regarding privacy and cyberbullying, I want to know how to handle those issues or at least how to inform students that what they are doing can have lasting consequences and follow then around forever. I'm also interested in teaching students about using information online without plagiarizing.

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    1. That's so interesting that phones are allowed in your school. An awesome tool, but also something for you all to monitor. Teaching students how to find credible resources is a big deal! It's definitely something that will travel with them through their entire education! Awesome ideas and reasons for joining the book club!

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  12. My name is Amber Hausman and I'm a kindergarten teacher at Greensburg Elementary. I hope to learn ways to help my students become good digital citizens. I would like students to understand the importance of not only good technology use in the classroom, but also relating to their personal technology use outside of school. I want to help equip them with the tools/skills they need to become a good digital citizen.

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    1. It's wonderful seeing a member of the Digital Citizenship community participating in the book study! I love that you want to "help equip" your kinders! This is exactly when we need to begin digital citizenship awareness and development to our learners!

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  14. Hi all! My name is Laura Walker and I am a 5th grade teacher at Edison Elementary in Hammond. I feel our school is off to a good start with digital citizenship due to our media specialist Nancy Batliner. She begins teaching this topic day one. It is important for our students to learn how to use technology in responsible and appropriate ways. Making sure they know the important "Ps" of digital citizenship is vital. Since we are in the real world of technology, and babies are even beginning to use devices, then the responsibility, as Bearden states, must be a community responsibility. Beginning as early as possible is important. We all must teach our students the importance of leaving a positive digital footprint.
    I am looking forward to discovering how I can be a better role model and teacher of technology for my kids.

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    1. I like her statement about it being a community responsibility as well. I feel like this could be a way to incorporate parents in the students learning of digital citizenship since many of them need this training to help their child navigate the digital world.

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  15. Hi everyone. My name is Paula Harmon, and I serve a dual role at FJ Reitz High School in Evansville. I am the media specialist and teach the two AP Language courses offered at Reitz. Digital citizenship seems to become more important every year. The more I learn and know about it, the better I can educate the other teachers, staff, students, and parents In our community. There are so many different aspects to digital citizenship, and I look forward to discussing those with all of you.

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    1. I couldn't agree with you more. I look forward to discussing those with you too, Paula.

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  16. Hello! I'm Elizabeth Finney, an instructional assistant who teaches in the computer lab at Carmel Elementary School in the Carmel-Clay school district. I taught in the lab last year, and am looking forward to teaching there again this year. I'm also in the Transition to Teaching program at Indiana Wesleyan, graduating at the end of this school year with a teaching license. I am fascinated with technology and its impact on our world and our children. I was impressed by the first chapter of this book - it introduced a relatively broad spectrum of aspects of digital citizenship, and it seems to be a useful introduction to the topic. I teach one class on citizenship to each grade level at my elementary school, so a fifty minute period a year, although the teachers probably supplement this info, and I do somewhat throughout the year, but I think I need a more systematic approach this year. That's what I'm hoping to get from this book group, some thoughtful approaches to presenting this material to children and helping them work through the aspects of digital citizenship.

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    1. I'm also excited to implement a more systematic approach to teaching digital citizenship. I look forward to hearing your ideas, since you've taught this in the past.

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    2. We used www.commonsensemedia.org, which has tools for different grade levels. It's very logical, but it seems to me that the ideas are spread throughout the grade levels - so in 1st grade, for instance, you learn about email, and in upper grades you learn about cyberbullying - but really all the grades need to hear about the issues mentioned in this first chapter. But then you're teaching and reteaching and reteaching and the kids tune you out by the second or third year. So I'm not sure how to handle that, except by coming up with better age-appropriate activities to drive home the ideas. Technically none of my kids should be on social media, since none of them are thirteen, but in reality, I was contacted by two students on Facebook last year to ask me to be their friend. Parents are sometimes making the decision, or kids are going around them, to join social media below the "appropriate" ages. So it's harder to argue, well, you don't have to talk about x or y, just cover w for now. . .

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    3. Thanks for the website. I checked it out and there are a lot of great classroom resources!
      My 4th grade students always ask if they can be my "friend" on Facebook. I tell them I am their teacher, not their friend.
      That said, I would like to be able to connect with them online. Our schools will be using Google classroom, so hopefully this will serve the purpose of furthering educational dialogue outside of the classroom.

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  17. Hello! My name is Linda Barberia and I'm a special education teacher with NISEC and have my main classroom at Meister Elementary in the River Forest school district.
    The title Digital Citizenship was a foreign concept to me and I had to snicker a little when I received an answer on the first page of chapter 1. It was one of those “oh” moments because there was a simple definition. I consider myself a little technology challenged and striving to improve. I do use technology every day and have used it on a limited bases in my classroom because of limited accessibility. As a teacher I do think it is important to be current and explore various teaching opportunities. Using the internet opens many avenues but as with anything appropriate behavior and care need to be addressed first. I look forward to continuing this discussion.

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    1. I am glad to have someone in the book club that also considers themselves a little challenged. I know technology is the future but sometimes I wonder if I can keep up.

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  18. Hello. My name is Kelly Dumaresq, and I'm a fourth grade teacher at Edison Elementary School in the School City of Hammond district. By gaining comprehensive knowledge regarding digital citizenship, I will be able to assist my students with becoming better collaborators and learners using technology. The students need to understand what digital citizenship to be more productive within the classroom, work towards positive goals, and in order to be able to stay away from the drama that can be caused by living in a digital world.

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  19. Hi! I'm Meghann Goetz, and I'm a fourth grade teacher at Arlington Heights Elementary in Bloomington. I'm looking forward to learning more about digital citizenship so that I can be more confident in using technology to connect my students and guide them in authentically communicating their learning with others. I was excited to see Beardon acknowledge that sometimes we as adults do not always know enough about Digital Citizenship. I've felt a bit of a lack of knowledge in this regard, even though I grew up with computers and the internet. In the past, I've found myself wondering if online resources are appropriate or permitted for students. I'm hoping this book will help me to make a more educated decision based on facts rather than fear, and that this will broaden the scope of what we do with technology in our classroom.

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    1. I agreed that I need to become more confident with my use of technology so that I can connect with my students. I understand that my students love getting on the internet and if I can use the internet to inspire more learning then I am accomplishing my desire to help students want to continue to learn.

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  20. Hello, My name is Barb Lazzaro. I am a FACS teacher at Hanover Central Middle School in Cedar Lake, IN. I want to learn about digital citizenship to be able to help my students know what is right and what is wrong when they are online. I want them to be prepared to go to college and have a career one day and this is extremely important to their success. I think it is as important as having manners when not online. Everyone needs to be educated on this. Very excited for the book!

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    1. I teach at Kankakee Valley. Great to see another "region" area teacher on here! Last school year KV made a push for the staff to be a little more prepared for their 1:1 initiative with some digital citizenship training. I recall we had to watch a few videos on the topic at the commonsensemedia.org website. We were assigned to do it on our own time. I am guessing this will become the new norm at school corporations. Have you had any training at HCMS?

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  21. Hi, my name is Leigh Anne Eck, and this is my third year of teaching 6th grade ELA in Vincennes. Prior to moving to middle school, I taught 4th and 5th grade. Two things are prompting me to become more literate about digital citizenship. We are going 1:1 so our students will have much more access, and I need to become a better facilitator of digital learning and responsibility. Social media becomes a bigger part of the lives of middle school students, and I need to be better prepared to handle social media issues, especially cyber bullying. I look forward to sharing my thoughts on the book as well as learning from everyone else.

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    1. Hi, Leigh Anne! Your motivation is shared by others. Great to see you in the book club AND in the Digital Citizenship Community for IN on Google+. I'm looking forward to learning with you during the book club and through the school year!

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  22. Good evening! My name is Tricia Snow and I teach 6th grade ELA at Fort Branch Community School in Fort Branch, IN. Digital citizenship is critical for the youth of today's generation to understand. I feel it's my responsibility to continue to learn about it in order to teach my students how to be responsible with their own digital footprints. Especially as a 1:1 school, it should be part of our curriculum, and it seems to be ever-evolving. I want to be more educated in this realm, and learn new ways to integrate it more deliberately into my lessons.

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  23. My name is Janice Pattengale and I am a high school math teacher at Riley High School in the South Bend Comminity School Corp. I would like to see more positive use of digital technology and consider students constant desire to use the Internet, texting, or emails without consideration of what is happening around them as poor digital citizenship. I believe this should be an interesting and enlightening forum.

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  24. I am Valerie Zemaitis in my 27th year as a Social Studies teacher in the School Town of Munster. Technology is part of developing students to their fullest potential, however it needs to be used effectively. I am witnessing the misuse of social media, and it is not just from students. I do believe in the systematic approach as the means to a successful end and am looking forward to how I can continue this conversation.

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    1. Totally agree that it just isn't students misusing texhnology.

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    2. I also agree with this. As teachers, we need to be positive role models.

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    3. So true! When we look at the ISTE Standards for Teachers (especially #4 on Digital Citizenship) we as educators are called to understand, promote, model, develop, advocate, and address digcit. I like to think of the standards as a foundation to build on rather than as a checklist to cover.

      https://www.iste.org/docs/pdfs/20-14_ISTE_Standards-T_PDF.pdf

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  25. Hello, and good evening all! My name is Tereasa Kotzo and I am a Special Education teacher covering two schools in Highland, IN. I provide special education services for students in grades K thru 5. Digital Citizenship is very important for your students. In Highland one of the schools that I teach at went one-to-one with I-Pads for every student last year. This year my other school will also become a one-to-one with I-Pads. I am looking forward to see what my students already know and what we will learn together as the year progresses! I want to learn as much about Digital Citizenship, so that I can answer the questions that my students will have. I look forward to using this new technology in my lesson planning.

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    1. That is awesome that the elementary schools in Highland are going 1:1. My son went to Southridge. I wish he has the opportunity when he went there.

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    2. It should be an adventure, and it will open so many new doors in our ability to incorporate technology into our lessons!

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    3. can't wait to work with you again this school year.

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  26. Hi, my name is Brian Snow. I teach 6th and 7th grade social studies at Fort Branch Community School in Fort Branch, IN. In the ever changing landscape of education, digital citizenship has become a paramount tool in the education of our students. Gone are the days of strictly paper and pencil assessments. Teachers and students alike must be well-versed in digital citizenship to take advantage of the multiple technology opportunities that exist for students. I hope to become more knowledgeable in this aspect of education.

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  27. Hello! My name is Beth Buss and I am a Special Education teacher at Klondike Middle School. I co-teach three sections of math and have the students for a math lab. This coming school year all of our students will be issued Chromebooks. Over the last few years, I have noticed that my students are social media confident, though not responsible. These same students are not used to using the internet for meaningful research or assisting themselves in learning. I need to equip myself with as much knowledge as possible in order to be able to use the Chromebooks most effectively in my classroom.

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    1. I teach special education at the elementary level. Last year I had chromebooks for my students most of the time. We are not 1:1 yet but we will be soon. The chromebooks are great tools, but I agree that students need to be taught how to use them. Teaching digital citizenship alongside this will maximize the benefits. Good luck!

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  28. Hello, my name is Beth Harwood and I teach 3rd grade at Southridge Elementary in Highland, IN. Our elementary schools will all be 1:1 technology this year when the remaining buildings will be issuing iPads to the students this fall. Becoming more literate about digital citizenship will be imperative this year and moving forward in order to instruct the children properly while using technology in the classroom. I find that in third grade, we are all over the place with how comfortable the children are with technology. Some students can operate computers, tablets, phones, etc. rather easily where others are true beginners. That being said, I feel like the digital citizenship knowledge is the same. It would be beneficial to become more knowledgable in order to pass that on to my students.

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    1. Can't wait to work with you again this year.

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  29. Hi! My name is Laura Pinter. I am currently a preschool teacher at Lafayette Academy in Floyds Knobs, IN. We work with the New Albany, Floyd County Schools. I have taught kinder and first grade...and after having kiddos and several moves across the country moved down to the preschool level. Our school is highly motivated to stay connected to the district schools as we flow into them regularly. Even at a preschool level we see the importance of incorporating technology into the classrooms. As a 36 year old I sometimes feel that these 3 and 4 year olds are much more technology savvy than I am. As I went back into the classroom we began using Ipads and the Apple TV...I'm not going to lie...I often had to ask a 3 year old a question ("where is the volume button, how do I go back??") of how to use this technology. As a school we are extremely motivated to educate our kiddos on using technology properly...so that being said...I need to be able to do so too. As we begin working with this new age system of computers and tablets I find important that even at this young age we use etiquette with technology and "cyber space" As these kiddos go onto elementary school using the internet has become the new norm. I want to work on preparing these kiddos for what is expected. The web is so big and has so much information on it...both good and bad. So I guess what would benefit me as well as the kiddos as I become more literate about digital citizenship is learning how to use it as good and avoiding the bad/negative. At the age group I am working with it would be more so of the educational websites...how to find them and how to navigate them. With this not only would I be helping the kiddos but educating their parents along with it. I am excited to learn more about this book...the first chapter had so many "ah-ha" moments! I never thought about digital footprinting my kiddos as I put them onto my blog or other social media types!

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    1. As educators, I think is important to realize that it is OK to ask our students about technology. It creates a learning environment for everyone involved. It also show students that teachers are learners as well.

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    2. I agree about the digital footprint. I'm sure I'm not the only one that googled myself and my own kid after reading that section!

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    3. OH my goodness! My Fab Firsts know way more than I do about tech! They fix problems for each other and try new things all the time.

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    4. I was recently at a funeral service in which three siblings (toddler-age 6)were preoccupied with iPads. Yes, even the toddler had her own iPad. All were using the same app. The toddler was randomly pushing and slapping at the screen and perimeter. The middle child had little understanding of how to successfully function within the app, but was touching the screen with greater purpose than the toddler. The oldest sibling functioned within the app successfully (as successful as a 6 year old can be) and frequently reached over to assist and instruct the middle sibling. Sadly, I was preoccupied with observing their iPad behavior and mentally processing the use of iPad babysitters at a funeral (and where else...for how long...oh my, the questions). My students LOVE using technology! Technology in the classroom creates an environment where everyone is a teacher and everyone is a learner. I believe educators have to make a commitment to use technology as a learning tool not just a toy. Thus, random pushing and slapping is transformed into purposeful success!

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  30. Hello, my name is Sarah Morehouse. I previously taught second grade at Cherry Tree Elementary in Carmel and now am a stay-at-home mom. The benefit of learning about digital citizenship for me and my kids is to increase my comfort with use of digital communities and the software platforms that house these communities. My plan is to increase awareness for myself & students so that we may make informed decisions about when and how to communicate through digital platforms.

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    1. Hi, Sarah! I thought that this book might be useful for parents too so I'm glad that you're in the class! I like the idea that digital citizenship is a partnership among parents, students, and teachers, and you exemplify that.

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  31. Hello, my name is Kris Taylor. I will be teaching Business Education for Fairfield Community Schools. Previously, I taught computer for grades K-6. It is very important to teach Digital Citizenship to all grade levels. By increasing our awareness and knowledge-base, we can become wiser technology users. Digital Citizenship needs to be taught and reinforced by all staff. Most content areas use some type of technology and Digital Citizenship should become part of everyone's best practices.

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    1. Have you taught a Digital Citizenship class to Middle School students? If so, what approach did you use?

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  32. Hello, everyone! I see that almost everyone who has posted so far is currently working in the schools. I'm going to be one of the exceptions. My name is Constance (Connie) Bailey, and I've been a Probation Officer in Lawrence County for ten years. I am certified to teach elementary, as well as science, social studies, and reading for grades 1-9. I've kept my teaching license current in case I want to go back into the classroom

    Most of my clients are juveniles, but I do have some adult clients. I've had several juveniles over the years who have been placed on probation for internet and technology related offenses, such as disseminating materials harmful to minors, which would be sending inappropriate images by text or posting on-line. Part of the case plans for my clients is helping them to understand appropriate usage of the internet, social media, and other technologies.

    I think this book and the book club will help me learn more ways to help my kids develop appropriate digital citizenship, as well as help me if I re-enter the classroom.

    I'm looking forward to interacting with all of you!

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    1. Oooh, Constance, you're going to bring such an interesting perspective to the bookclub! Looking forward to hearing your take on the issues!

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  33. Hi, my name is Katie Schaffner and I teach math at Bishop Chatard High School in Indianapoli. We have been 1:1 for several years so digital citizenship has been hot topic, but is has hit home more recently as my 6 year old son, like Ms. Bearden's grandchild, has gotten into youtube and started asking if he can post videos (which I have not let him do). I feel like I cannot help my students or my son unless I am more educated about digital citizenship. I have avoided social media myself, but it is becoming more and more clear that our students can't live without it. This year I will be teaching freshmen, so I feel especially responsible for helping them navigate their digital identity in this new domain.

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    1. Katie, this jumped out to me in this chapter as well. I have a 4-year-old son, and I want to keep him away from social media and honestly screens in general just because there's no reason for him to be using them. I feel like I am standing in water rushing around my feet and trying to hold on tight-- even if we don't do anything at home on computers he will see them at the baby-sitter's as older kids get there after school and do their homework. There's no way I can stop all the screens. But I am like you and would like to be more educated on what I can do to help him be safe and balanced.

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  34. Hi, my name is Melissa LaShure and I teach mild interventions at West Noble Schools. We are working on becoming 1:1. I am excited about implementing technology in the classroom and connecting with other teachers who are currently implementing technology in their classroom.

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  35. Hello there. My name is Matthew Howard, and I am a high school English teacher at Winamac High School. I want to learn more about digital citizenship because of the nature of how quickly the Internet changes in the way we interact with it. It’s important that I stay up to date on how my students are interacting online and the ramifications of such. Students are largely unsupervised during online usage, so it is important that I make it a point to integrate digital citizenship in my curriculum so students are not just left to figure out things on their own. I’ve taught a few lessons on this before, focused largely on online advertising and social media. Students were very open with me about how much they have shared online without thinking of the ramifications. For many of them the concept of “clickbait” was completely new to them. It’s important that I have the knowledge to help guide students in their way of using the online world today, and am able to adapt to the changes as they come along.

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  36. Hi, all! I’m JoyAnn Boudreau. I work at Hamilton Southeastern’s Intermediate/Junior High. As the school’s library/media specialist, part of my role is to help educate students about digital citizenship through mini lessons and to be a leader with digital citizenship. I already teach lessons on several of these topics, but I know I need to continue adding in even more, and I also know that I need to work on getting everyone on board with a more school wide/community approach. I’m also looking to become a Common Sense Digital Citizenship Certified School – I probably won’t be able to tackle that this year with other projects, but I want to start thinking this year about how to tackle that, so I can implement it the following school year. Becoming educated about digital citizenship will help me better complete this goals and students will be equipped to lead responsible, well-informed digital lives. I had also planned on putting some technology tips in our school's newsletter each month for parents this year, and I'd like to incorporate digital citizenship into that in addition to device information (iPads).

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    1. Yay! I am so glad to see another Digital Citizenship Community member in the book club! We CAN definitely support you in getting your school certified this year! Think of it less as the end project and more like opening the door to a new year. Have you seen the plans for Indiana DigCitWeek? They can help you tackle most of the requirements for certification.

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    2. Hi, JoyAnn! You are exactly right. It has to be more than just a lesson here and there when we, the librarians, can get our foot in the door.

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  38. Ditial Citizenship

    Week #1 – Introduction and Chapter 1
    Hello! My name is Michelle Sparling, and I teach 9th grade English and Current Events at Southwood Jr.-Sr. High School. In August I will begin my thirty-first year of teaching. My school has been a 1:1 school for four years. While I have learned more computer skills than I dreamed possible when we first received our MacBook Air laptops, I know my students and I can benefit from learning more.

    I have tried Twitter twice before in the past, only to quickly abandon it after the professional development sessions I attended. I want to be exposed to new materials and keep up with some teachers in my district on Twitter. Many of my students use Twitter, and I want them to realize the impact of their words on Twitter and all social media. Some of them would be shocked to realize how many adults see what they post. I want them to understand that employers sometimes look at a job applicant's social media and it is important to be good digital citizens. Years ago, some students in my Honors class posted some inappropriate replies on a blog we were writing that let me know they were not taking handling the assignment well; it was just a big joke to them. That evening I typed up a Digital Citizenship Etiquette List that I enforced the rest of the school year. Later that year my principal asked me for a copy of it because she wanted to reference it to a similar document she was creating with our PBIS team. In the past couple of years I have probably skimmed over these guidelines because our students have grown more accustomed to the proper use of the laptops. This summer our corporation announced a reconfiguration that will be happening in our district. People are emotional and unsure of what will be happening at our schools in the next several years. This has led to some unfortunate social media posts by adults. It is a good time to remind students of what they are encouraged to share and what they should be very careful about sharing on social media. I will need to learn as much as I can and model good Digital Citizenship with my students. If I am thinking about teaching Digital Citizenship, it would benefit my students and I in several important ways including student safety, student performance and behavior, and it would increase student responsibility and effort. Students catch on very quickly if a teacher is a confident leader.

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    1. Wow, Michelle, that is powerful example of how digital citizenship affects us all. My facebook feed has had lots of strongly-worded comments during this summer of high tension with the presidential race and primaries and shootings. I am many times dumbfounded by the things that people think it is ok to say online. And these are adults, people I know (sometimes), not even hidden by the cloak of anonymity. You are completely right that we teachers need to model good digital citizenship with our students.

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    2. I agree with Rebecca! Michelle, your point speaks to the message I've been sharing this summer...Building a Better Digital Citizen Begins with Me. I am excited to see a wave of confident teachers develop through this book study! I'm looking forward to learning with you!

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  39. Hi Elizabeth
    I just went to a workshop about commonsensemedia.org. It seemed to have a lot of activities for the elementary. Did you like it? I also teach Elementary and have used netsmartz.org. it has a good video about online and real world safety for the younger students. It has good videos for the older as well but like you,I feel it isn't enough

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    1. I did like it - the activities were fun, and I had a couple of good discussions with the older kids. I had a little difficulty incorporating all of the parts of the plan - some classes didn't do the assessments, for instance - but I did it fairly early in the fall semester and it was my first time leading classrooms regularly - before being the Computer Lab IA I was more one on one or leading small reading groups. :) Time management is a tricky thing to, well, manage... I remember the first grade class being about email, because I demonstrated writing an email to one class's teacher, and she, bless her, replied while the kids were there and they were so excited to see her reply! I appreciate the tip about netsmartz.org. We may have that linked as a game the kids can go to - will have to look. I think instead of doing one class focused on digital citizenship and then nothing more, I'd rather do at least one a quarter, and incorporate more tips into regular classes. I need to check with the school media specialist as well to see what she incorporates throughout the year.

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    2. I really like your idea of doing something each quarter. I think that's a great idea!

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  40. Hello. My name is Stacie Schuster. I am the media Specialist at Jefferson Elementary School in Hammond. I think as more and more schools are going to 1 on 1 and technology is a huge part of life, it is very important to teach students beginning at a young age about Digital Citizenship. I think a lot of people don't understand how what they do online can impact them and others in both a positive and negative way and like the book stated, what it online is permanent. As the media Specialist I am always looking for new ways to educate my students. In the past I have used Netsmartz.org which is mainly vidoes. This summer I attended a workshop on commonsensemedia.org which I am going to look into more this school year. I look forward to this book club and to getting new ideas.

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  41. Hi, everyone! My name is Rebecca Ippel, and I am the ENL teacher at Plymouth High School. Honestly digital citizenship is not the first thing that jumps to mind as a topic I really want to study-- I'm a little bit of a Luddite and feel grumpy towards technology a lot. But at the same time I do own a smartphone and spend more time scrolling through social media sites than I'd like to confess. I don't want to let the digital age just happen to me, my family, and my students. I want to do a better job of going in with my eyes open to the risks and benefits of being so interconnected on the internet. My students will benefit from me learning more about digital citizenship-- it's no good for me to stick my head in the sand and pretend like computers will go away. I hope to be a voice helping them to think about what they are posting and the permanence of it, and also giving them guidance and experience in beneficial and kind ways to use social media. I enjoyed the first chapter and look forward to the rest of the book.

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    1. Hi Becca! Good to see you here :)

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    2. I really appreciate your honesty! Congratulations on deciding to begin the journey (as Susan would say), and we are alongside you on the path!

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    3. Rebecca, I feel as if I could re-post what you said and it would be what I’d say. I even have a friend who calls me a Luddite!
      I know that computers and the internet are impacting our lives and changing education, and I need to be able to understand what’s out there. Though learning about digital citizenship would not be my first choice of what to study either, I want to help my students make good decisions. I want to be able to model good digital citizenship and answer their questions.
      I teach Spanish at a 1:1 middle/high school. Things are changing so fast! (Last year was our first year 1:1.) Before I can bring better awareness of good digital citizenship to my classroom, I have to know what that really means, so I think this book discussion is a good place to start. Forward and onward!

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    4. I love this line of yours, "I don't want to let the digital age just happen to me, my family, and my students." I think that exactly sums up what we all want and why we we're taking the time and energy to participate in this book club. In some sense, the digital age CAN just happen to us if we're not careful, and it might run over us - being a digital citizen, and teaching our kids digital citizenship, is putting weapons in our hands to keep from being overrun!

      I went to an awesome conference at Carmel-Clay, at which Kevin Honeycutt spoke, and he said that he wanted to be involved in the digital age because because he didn't want them to go around him. He used the example of gas lamps - they were a thing, they provided light, they were having a really good year, but electricity suddenly went around them and they were outdated and over with. It's good for us all to be involved in this so we stay a part of this digital world, and can participate in it and make changes and keep the values we know and love alive. Good post - thanks for sharing it!

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  42. Week One - Introduction and Chapter One

    Hello! My name is Heather Killion, and I am an elementary music specialist in the Kankakee Valley School Corporation. This upcoming school year I will be starting my 16th year of teaching. KV will be a 1:1 school corporation this fall with Chromebooks given to all students elementary through high school. I am excited to be here participating in this digital citizenship book discussion.

    To become more literate about digital citizenship, I believe, will be of great benefit to myself and my students. As for my students, one of the points that resounded to me in chapter one was that digital citizenship goes hand in hand with character education. At one of my elementary buildings we have a character education plan in place called P.A.W.S., Positive Actions While At School. It will be important to now include digital behavior and actions online as an extension of offline behavior. Positive and smart digital habits learned at an early age will hopefully carry through high school and beyond. Preventative maintenance such as teaching my students what they should and should not share as well as how to address any online situations that might make them feel uncomfortable are important things for early aged users to comprehend. At the same time, it is important that young students not fear using the internet because it can and will provide some amazing opportunities such as in collaborative learning. For myself, reading about digital footprint was an eye opener. It is important to remember that we as teachers are role models in our school community so thinking twice about posting something on social media is crucial. We should definitely remember to practice the same habits we teach our students to practice! I will be interested to read other posts and comments about how this book club is positively impacting teachers and classrooms across Indiana!

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    1. I agree with what you wrote. In the last few years I have taught my 2nd grade students that if anyone tries to contact them online, meet them, or get them to give them personal information, to tell their parents or another trusted adult. There are so many benefits to having technology but there are many dangers as well. We just need to help educate our students.

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  43. Hi, everyone! My name is Quinn Selner and I am the Life Skills teacher at Plymouth High School. Our corporation is 1:1. All of my students use computers. Some use the computers in a responsible manner, and others not very responsibly. I feel as though my students have a lot of access to digital media...in some cases too much. Our school does a nice job of addressing digital citizenship as a whole, but I feel that my lower cognitively functioning students do not grasp the full meaning of digital citizenship. Numerous times I have had students get into trouble and lose computer access for looking up inappropriate materials. I think many times the issues my students have are due to curiosity and lack of understanding of the impact/digital footprint. I enjoyed the first chapter and feel that it is very on target. I think that if I could educate my parents about supervision and appropriate usage, maybe the connection between home and school rules will have a greater impact on my students?

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  44. Hello! I am Rebecca Sanders. I currently teach Read180 at Michigan City High School in the Freshmen Academy. I am interested in the Digital Citizenship because more and more we are pushing toward technology. My district just had extensive Google training last year throughout the year. This year we are going to add Blackboard as an LMS and move toward putting every core course online.
    Students want to use technology, but they like to use social media. More and more social media sites are starting to come up with innovative methods to incorporate the applications into education. Students need to start using technology more along these lines and connecting with other globally for educational purposes. Working with high school students, a lot of drama starts over social media outside of school and carries into the building negatively impacting the learning environment. My goal is to learn more about digital citizenship and pass this knowledge along to my students.

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  46. Hello! My name is Katie Lauer and this will be my 6th year of teaching in Hammond, IN. This year I will be teaching 7th and 8th grade. Just this morning I saw that my school has a job posting for a Business Education- Digital Citizenship class! This is exciting because there has been a lot of talk about getting a class that teaches the kids the importance of technology and how to not only use all the different types, but also be safe. The students at my school are allowed to have their phones in the classroom. This has both positives and negatives. The positive is that students are able to use their phones for research and certain assignments and the negative is that he phones can easily become a distraction. Currently I am trying to bring more technology into the classroom as well as educating myself on various types. Lastly, being in the middle school, social media causes a lot of drama. I think it is very important to teach our students the importance of technology and how to properly use it. I am hoping this new class at my school will do just that. We need to bring more awareness to our students.

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    1. Social media definitely causes drama... That's awesome that your school has created a class for digital citizenship. I think it's really important that they start young knowing how to interact online, so it's neat that schools are having specific classes for that. I also agree with you that they should be aware of what is happening around them, with or without their participation!

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  47. Hello! I'm Christine Hernandez and I am an Outreach Coordinator for the IDOE. I support several school districts in Region 6 NWI. I would like to become more familiar with digital citizenship so that I can help build the capacity of my building principals in this area. As the school community continues to increase the use of technology in the school it is important that we are able to support our students and prepare them to work in a global market.

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  48. Hello. I'm Amy Holtslander, Latin and English teacher at Concordia Lutheran High School in Fort Wayne. I would like my students to become more discriminating digital citizens aware of the wide variety of materials and media available to them. Even though our students all have iPads, it's amazing how they all use the same apps, sites, media over and over.

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  49. Hello. My name is Sheila and I am a 4th grade teacher in Hammond, Indiana. It is amazing to me how many 9 and 10 year olds in a low-income district have iphones and such. Since our school has a policy of no phones in the classroom, the students turn them into me each morning; so, I have quite a display of phones on my desk. I really do not like the responsibility of having them in my possession; however, the alternatives would be in their desks (which would be a distraction) or in their lockers (where we have had phones stolen from.) I love technology and wish we could find a way for students to be honest digital citizens in the classroom; so, we could incorporate their use in a positive manner. I also wish we could have a Chromebook or other form of technology for each student in the classroom. I feel that if it was the norm and not just a rotation, students would be less apt to explore prohibited things on their own. Since they are not on them much in our setting, students want to go exploring. Technology is the way of the future and it is up to us to help them find their way safely and respectfully on the internet.

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  50. Good Afternoon! I'm Kathryn Evans and I teach Family and Consumer Science (FACS) at Chesterton Middle School. I believe it is part of my job to make my students prepared for the "real world". This would entail what it takes to be a informed digital citizen. Technology is not going away and we need to help the youth of our nation be responsible with all this media at their fingertips. In the future, my school district will be going 1:1 and any information would help both myself and my students.

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  51. Hello! My name is Elizabeth Biggs and I teach 4th grade at Southridge Elementary School in Highland, IN. Our school and district is going 1:1 using IPads this coming school year. I feel it is very important to educate myself on how to create responsible Digital Citizens in my classroom. Many of the students are very knowledgeable and using social media sites and apps on their phones and tablets but I do not think they fully understand that what they write can and will impact them now and in the future. Cyberbullying is also a concern I have as I look to incorporate more technology into my classroom. I look forward to learning a lot that can improve my techology instruction through this blog and book.

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  52. Good evening!! My name is Constance (Connie) Painter and I teach Kindergarten at Hershey Elementary (TSC) in Lafayette! I know my students are young but they have never known life without a variety of technologies (from toys, vehicles, phones, computers, etc.) I "used" to think that I was advanced but wow, I'm really a dinosaur! I want my students to start at a very young age to respect and become knowledgeable about whatever device they happen to log into. It's not about the "apparatus" but really about knowing who they are connecting to and being safe/security conscious. It can be an amazing resource and connectivity around the globe but it also has a negative side as well.
    PS see I am already having issues because it is only allowing me to post this comment as unknown even though it showed my google profile and has a place to sign out!! yikes...seriously!

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  53. Hi. I'm Sabrina Minser K-4 technology integrationist at Canterbury Lower School. I am looking forward to gathering ideas and resources to use with my students and teachers to help them become more informed about all aspects of digital citizenship. I plan to blend our robotics unit with technology/digital citizenship. Not sure yet how I'll proceed but I have a few ideas.

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  55. Good evening! My namee is Ashley Gustin. I teach 5/6th grade at East Elementary in South Madison Community Schools. We are going 1:1 next year. I feel this increasing need to be prepared to handle digital citizenship before devices are in hand. I feel very comfortable using technology in my classroom, but I am scared about how quickly the digital world can negatively impact a student's life. So...here's to me working hard at becoming more aware of my students' needs and ways to teach them to be positive digital citizens.

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    1. I completely agree with being scared about the digital world negatively impacting a student's life. My students are fourth graders, and too young to be on most social media sites, but they are participants just the same. I really want to help them see technology as more than just posting pictures, texting, and playing games. I'm hoping to help them see how their activities on-line today can impact their future.

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  56. Hi, I'm Michelle and I'm part of the INeLearn team with our book club moderator, Meri Carnahan. Seeing everyone's posts has me extremely excited about the new school year and our effort to promote a statewide focus on digital citizenship. I hope everyone participating in the book club will be interested in also joining the newest IDOE Community of Practice on Google+. It's all about Digital Citizenship, and educators in all roles are invited. We are gearing up for the inaugural Indiana Digital Citizenship Week and have resources for all grade levels and roles. Join us by going to http://bit.ly/DigCitCommunity

    Thank you all for affirming what I know to be true about educators! I am looking forward to discussing the book with you the next several weeks. We are truly on this journey together!

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  57. Hello! My name is Rachel Hamilton. I normally teach Family and Consumer Science to eighth grade students at Kankakee Valley Middle School but am on a year of maternity leave.
    If I were to become more literate in digital citizenship I would be able to comfortably teach my students about it. I do have a few standards pertaining to digital citizenship but have passed them up in the past due to not being comfortable with the topic. Last year KVMS implemented 1:1 with the eighth grade students and this year we will expand to 6-8 1:1 so understanding digital citizenship is crucial.

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  58. Hello! My name is Desiray Tison. I am an 8th grade Resource teacher at Mt. Vernon Middle School. If I were to become more literate in digital citizenship I would be a better resource for my students. My school implemented 1:1 last year. I wish there would have been more time to discuss the importance of digital citizenship before distribution of the chromebooks. I plan to incorporate mini lessons weekly on the importance of digital citizenship and how it impacts every aspect of a person's life.

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    1. I would love to know how your weekly lessons work, as I think this would be a great way to introduce/teach digital citizenship to students.

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  59. I am a special education teacher in the Gary Community School Corporation. I presently teach MOCD elementary intermediate students. My classroom is self contained.

    I have found my students are sometimes better able to navigate applications than me. If you noticed I probably registered multiply times with different e-mail addresses. I would like very much to drown my fears and see technology as a positive move into the future. I need to embrace the benefits and learn how to avoid problems such as safety and security.

    Effective instruction in this subject area will give students the ability to use technology as a tool for learning. I have seen the advancements made by my students when technology was infused into the learning process two years ago. They became more involved in their own learning. My goal is to make their experience enjoyable but safe.

    I do not consider myself literate in any of the eight digital citizenship categories. I plan to achieve a fair amount of literacy in each category by the end of this seven week book reading. Just understanding having one password is not a good idea made me realize I have much to learn.


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    1. Hi Josie! Although you stated that you are not literate in any of the eight categories of digital citizenship, I would have to disagree. You have already given us an honest introduction to yourself and what you do with your students. In my opinion, you have already given yourself a positive "digital footprint." ;) I've noticed there are several other special education teachers within this book study. I find that interesting and exciting to meet others with a shared career.

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    2. A "digital footprint" scares me. I should let you know I am old enough to receive social security. I am always thinking if I embrace the internet someone will scam me. Several times during the school year I've had to ask for support from the school's IT department because bogus FBI notices locked me out. The scammer asked for a fee to reset the computer. I would like to learn more about security. I often hear about "cookies". Should I pour a glass of milk?

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  60. I am a special education teacher in Valparaiso, with students from grades K to 6 on my caseload. The middle schoolers at my school are going one-to-one this year, and I want to be able to help them in the best manner. I am interested in digital citizenship for all my students, for myself, and for my educational community. Technology is changing so rapidly that I believe every tool I can gain as a teacher will be beneficial. The first chapter covered so much more than I had previously considered as part of digital citizenship. Through this book study, I hope to gain new knowledge. I'm excited about expanding my competency in this area.

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    1. I agree with you that technology is changing rapidly. It seems to be moving faster than I can keep up with at times. My youngest son is a senior in high school so he helps to keep me updated on technology.

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  61. Hello! My name is Rachel Tuttle. This will be my 5th year as a Resource/Special Education Teacher at Green Township Elementary in the MSD of Martinsville. I work with students ranging from Kindergarten to 5th grade. Although we work with technology within our school, if I became more literate about digital citizenship, I could not only teach my co workers, but also my students and their families about all the positive and negative impacts technology can have on all of our lives. Obviously, depending on the grade level, I could ensure my students understand what is appropriate and to be cautious of people, websites, and social media to help them with their digital footprint to be a positive one at an early age. Also, I could show my students the best resources for researching information. Some students (and adults) believe everything they see on the internet. We could help educate them early to not go along with everything they see. Some of my students, for example, the children with Autism Spectrum Disorder, could benefit greatly if I had a small group lesson as a social narrative where a student's self-image was different online compared to the real-world. We could should them at the appropriate age what is acceptable behavior and what negative comments, behavior should be avoided or ignored.

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    1. I think teaching families about digital citizenship is a key component to the success of students.

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    2. The use of social stories to teach digital citizenship to students with ASD is a great idea.

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    3. I'm a substitute teacher/aide in the Martinsville schools. Nice to see someone else from the district! I agree that it's important to teach the students and their families about the impacts of technology. I've seen how social media can impact students when they abuse it.

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  62. Hello! My name is Trina Thomas. I'm currently an instructional assistant for reading at Floyds Knobs Elementary, and I work with 1st and 3rd grade students. Previously, I was a kindergarten teacher (for 4 years) and hold an Indiana teaching certification for preschool through 6th grade.

    I'm interested and excited to learn more about digital citizenship. Digital learning is such an important part of today's education system, as well as a big part of how we socialize on a daily basis. I worry about my 7 year old son and how this will impact his learning, self-image, and relationships as he grows up in this digital world. I'm hoping to gain skills and knowledge regarding digital citizenship for myself, my students, and my son.

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  63. Hi all...I'm Angy Northern - Library Media Specialist at Southwestern Middle and High School -Hanover. We are starting our second year of 1:1 Chromebooks(corporation wide) next week. As with many “non-curricular” topics, I find that digital citizenship is another one of those skills that everyone assumes that “someone else” is teaching. I think it is vital that there be a digital citizenship component throughout our corporation. The first step in seeing this vision happen is for me to gain the knowledge that will enable me to develop a proposal to take to my administrators. This book group is the first step in the right direction.

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    1. I agree that many feel that students already know what digital citizenship is or that someone else has already taught them. However even parents need to be taught what digital citizenship is, there are many components to it.

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    2. Absolutely - or people feel since they have grown up with technology, they already know it!

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    3. I know what you mean when you say "digital citizenship is another on of those skills that everyone assumes" is being taught. Without a set lesson(s), students may or may not be familiar with digital citizenship.

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    4. Hi, Angy! In a previous district, that was definitely an issue. No one wanted to teach it because they saw it as interfering with their curriculum. The reality is we need to teach it all the time as an integrated piece. It doesn't have to be big, separate lessons. Of course, this also means that some of our teachers need to branch out and try social media as well as learn some of the things we teach as librarians.

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    5. Jenn..teachers and social media will be part of my focus this year. I'm hoping to help them experience at least one new professional learning group this year.

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  64. We live in a digital age and becoming literate about digital citizenship would help us be successful in today's digital world. I love the idea of having a community approach to teaching digital citizenship. I am thinking it could be possible to have a study for families to attend, where digital citizenship is taught. Susan mentioned in chapter 1 that many parents struggle to help their children navigate through the digital world because they are unaware of all that is out there, due to the fact that they did not grow up with it.
    In our school we have class that students attend once a week called endeavors. This is a class where our guidance counselor does lessons on character education and planning for the future. I can see curriculum on digital citizenship being woven into this class.

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  66. Hi, my name is Kara Heichelbech, and I am a digital communications teacher at Clark-Pleasant Middle School (just south of Indianapolis). We started school today!! I took a course over the summer to become certified through Common Sense Education, and I am so excited to share my knowledge gained with my students and colleagues. Technology is only growing in our society, and our students have to be able to confidently navigate the arena in order to prepare them for a successful future. To me, digital citizenship is as important a skill to teacher our students as reading. I have read too many cases of students not even having the change for success due to a poor choice that is permanently left behind.

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    1. Kara, will you tell me more about the course you took and how I could find future courses? Thanks, Sheila

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  67. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  68. I also would like to learn the current, acceptable format of citing pictures, photos, graphs, etc., so that students and staff are not plagiarizing.

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  69. I am Jean Gentry, and I teach seventh grade reading at Eastwood Middle School in MSD Washington Township, Marion County. As a parent, I came to the understanding of digital citizenship, or lack thereof, when my stepson said something inappropriate to his girlfriend in an online chat. Her parents took issue with what my stepson said in the chat, and there was a lot of explaining to do with the high school dean. My husband and I were naive to the idea of digital citizenship, and how an offhand remark online could potentially impact our son and his high school career.

    Adolescent students are emotional rather than rational when they are involved in relationship conflict. They may "say" things online that they would never consider saying face-to-face. As the neuroscientist Dr. Lori Desautels has taught teachers in Washington Township, "students react from their amygdalas and not their frontal lobes." When students react from the amygdala, they are in that highly emotional, fight or flight response. Reason and logic are not a part of the equation when adolescents feel threatened.

    As a seventh grade teacher, I hope to relay to my students the impact of their communication online. What they communicate can be used as evidence against them. I want to educate my students on how to communicate in ways that get their message across without compromising their relationships or risking discipline at school. I need to convey to them that it is okay to wait a few minutes and breathe before posting that irrational response online.

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  70. Hello, I'm Marilyn Lavanchy from Eastbrook North Elementary near Marion. I teach third grade and have been very interested in digital citizenship since our schools went 1:1 four years ago. I've had students make some poor choices in the past and my hope is to gain new insight so I can redirect students in making better choices. The choices they make now do make a difference in how they grow up. Digital citizenship is another important skill students, parents, and others in the community who help our student grow, need to take seriously in today's technological world.

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  71. Greetings! I'm Robbie Grimes from the Metropolitan School District of Wayne Township where I am the PreK-12 eLearning Specialist. One of my responsibilities is leading the charge for Digital Citizenship for our district. I attempted to get our whole district DigCit certified with Common Sense last year, but found some resistance in some buildings. I was successful in helping 7 buildings acquire their certification, however. This year, my goal is to get the other 4 elementary buildings, two middle schools, and our high school certified as well.

    I see a massive benefit to becoming more literate in the area of Digital Citizenship. Many adults today seem to think that just because kids can USE technology that they know how to use it APPROPRIATELY. That's been proven incorrect over and over again. The digital world, while similar to the physical one, is a vastly unique place with unwritten rules and caveats that are only learned well through experience, trial, and error....and a well intentioned mentor who can instruct the end user effectively. By learning about DigCit, teachers can instruct and model the appropriate uses of digital technologies in their classrooms and encourage appropriate use by their students.

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    1. Robbie - Several people have talked about becoming certified with Common Sense... I'll have to look into that. I don't know anything about it. Is it a long process? Thanks!

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    2. Right on! Unfortunately some districts/schools believe that the students know enough to be ready to go. I have even heard stories of private religious schools that thought their "good kids" would never do anything inappropriate. Oh boy! If you think about it, we teach children explicitly how to use a book, from how to face it the right direction, to how to open it, and more. The internet...we say, "Go!" Yikes!

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    3. The process isn't difficult at all. You just have to use the materials that Common Sense provides for free, and do some community outreach/education things. Pretty simple. I believe the benefit of being able to tell your community that you are DigCit certified far outweighs the minimal effort it takes to use the great materials provided by Common Sense!

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    4. Thanks, Robbie! I'll have to look into it. I appreciate your feedback.

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  72. Hello! I am Meghan Stetter, a World History teacher from Carroll High School in Northwest Allen County Schools. I will be using digital platforms, like Canvas, more heavily this year, so this book choice is perfect! To prepare for this year, I am navigating around the platform, trying to become more familiar with it. After reading the first chapter of this book, I realized that I should be navigating more of the internet, as well, so that I can be a better teacher to my students in terms of technology. I think the biggest part about using technology in the classroom is that teachers must be comfortable using it themselves. Only then, can teachers confidently help students with their creations, research, comments, etc., and vise versa, students can feel more comfortable asking teachers questions. Technology is here to stay, and I plan on using it more in my classroom, so I want to be as much as an expert on it as I can. I want to confidently teach and answer students' questions. This will help students learn not just World History, but real life skills, such as how to act on the internet and everything that goes along with digital citizenship. We already teach students how to be good US and Global Citizens in school, so I think Digital Citizenship is the next step.

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  73. Hi everyone, I'm Jason Robbins from Greensburg Community High School. I am no longer a classroom teacher but serve in the role of Technology Integrationist for the High School. I wear a few other hats throughout the year, but helping teachers make meaningful use of technology is my primary objective!

    When I become more literate with digital citizenship and all it entails I will be able to take full advantage of teachable moments as they happen. As an Integrationist I have the privilege of interacting with teachers, students, administrators, and even parents regarding technology use both in and out of the classroom. While I feel confident and comfortable with some of the more common pillars of digital citizenship there are conversations that I am missing due to my lack of a comprehensive understanding.

    I feel like one of the best ways to convey the messages behind digital citizenship is to discuss them in the moment when they are most meaningful. The critical part to that strategy is having the knowledge and resources available in long term memory for quick recall.

    My hope for this book study is to not only build that long term memory, but to also create a collection of relevant examples to use as discussion / talking points.

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    1. Hello Jason,
      I was reading your post and noticed your job description. I am getting ready to make my 1st post in the forum, but I am taking on a new position this year where "helping teachers make meaningful use of technology is my primary objective!"

      I was wondering if you would be up for some collaboration. I would really like to see what others are doing to make sure I get off to the right start.

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  74. Hi all! I haven't listened to this yet, but noticed on twitter that Susan Bearden was interviewed on this podcast:

    http://www.coolcatteacher.com/effective-digital-citizenship-education-schools/?utm_content=buffera1c07&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer

    (the twitter in the address may screw it up a little - my apologies if so.) They're talking specifically about the book it looks like.

    Have a great day! 10 days 'til school starts!

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    1. The link works great! Thanks, Elizabeth. Anyone interested in discussing the podcast, it's also linked in the Indiana Digital Citizenship Community:

      https://plus.google.com/u/0/communities/101578415004205884991

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  75. Hi everyone! My name is Lynn France. I am a Speech Language Pathologist at the Brownsburg Early Childhood Center. I am hoping to learn more about how to better collaborate and share information online. Many professional organizations and educators have wonderful information posted online. I have used twitter chats and other social media platforms. There appears to be more information in the world than I could ever read in my lifetime. The copyright information in Chapter 1 was new to me. So much information is shared and re-posted frequently that it will be good to have a guidance document to help us with copyright issues.

    As a mom of 2 Middle School students, it has been interesting to watch the next generation jump miles ahead of me technology wise. They cannot imagine a non-connected world. In their eyes, the Internet and Web has always existed. It has also been interesting to observe how communication is changing. 1000 group text messages might be exchanged when there is really nothing being said. Communication itself is no longer a verbal only practice. It will be interesting to see how technology will continue to impact communication in the future.

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  76. Greetings. My name is Melisa McCain and I will now be at Franklin Community High School, Franklin, Indiana.
    For the past 6 years I have been a 3rd/4th grade teacher in the same corporation. Our elementary schools are not 1:1. We have a few computer labs that are consistently overbooked and a few laptop carts that are always in use. We also have a BYOD initiative. Each teacher has a sign that hangs next to the classroom door and they turn it to "BYOD ON" or "BYOD OFF" to signal students when it is an appropriate time for using devices in the classroom. My concern with this practice is that most teachers hung the sign on "BYOD Off" and have never switched it in the last 5 years.

    My class is a little different. I put it on "BYOD ON" from the beginning and have never switched it in 5 years. I do have a conversation with the students on day 1 of each school year letting them know that the sign will never be changed - devices are always allowed in the room, as long as certain rules (digital citizenship) are being followed. If a rule is not followed - the individual may lose access, but not the classroom. We discuss, revise, and agree to the rules as a class. My students continuously use their devices as part of their education throughout the year:
    -If guest speakers come, they are recorded (with permission) from 3 or 4 different angles in the room.
    -If notes are taken on the board or in a small group work session, they are photographed and sent to all members of the classroom.
    -If an unknown location, vocab, bio, or idea is encountered, the meaning, pronunciation, and application are researched and shared before I can say, “I wonder..”

    I could go on with examples, but I also want to include that many of the fears that I have heard or read about (even in these forum posts) have never really been a problem in my classroom. A device was stolen once (on the bus not in the classroom), but within minutes of the problem being reported it was resolved due to the digital fingerprints on the device (history of home wifi networks etc) and because the parent followed my classroom recommendation of recording the serial number at home before any device is sent to school. It is hard to dispute the owner when you can make a phone call and within seconds the parent is spouting out the serial number. The devices are also not any more distracting than a pencil that can be used for doodling instead of taking notes or completing an assignment. It is not that the DEVICE is a distraction - the STUDENT is DISTRACTED. I try to take ownership of that in my room and ensure that my students are engaged.

    The point of my story is that I feel like BYOD works in my room because I empower students with digital citizenship starting the 1st day. Digital Citizenship is EMPOWERING. It lets everyone know where they stand with the expectations.

    I am really looking forward to being a part of this book study because I have been asked to take on a new position at the High School to create not only a technology innovation center, but a culture and atmosphere of technology innovation. I believe that has to start by empowering the teachers, students, staff and community as a whole with digital citizenship. I am going to attempt to lead the way in Digital Citizenship and want to make sure I do it right! It's just that important. With that said, I am a little intimidated. I have been working in the elementary where I have been able to form ideas of digital citizenship with the students, now I will be working with students who have already formed their own ideas of digital citizenship (whether right, wrong or indifferent.) It was also very easy to turn my own BYOD sign to green, but I am not sure how easy it will be to convince other teachers that it is okay to leave theirs on green. I am glad to have this book study and the great group of participants to lean on as I take on this new adventure in creating a culture, atmosphere, and center for innovation.

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    1. Thanks, Melisa, for your thoughtful and informative post! What an exciting new job for you! It sounds as if you are going to be in great shape to address these issues - you have lots of good stories to use to persuade teachers gently to let go of their fears and worries. I think your tip about recording the serial number is a very good one - it's never occurred to me to record the serial numbers of my daughters' devices - doing that today! Do you use - or did you use, in elementary school - a learning management system such as Canvas? We're implementing Canvas this year and people are quite intimidated. I've taken two classes on it already but I need to play with it more to try and feel more comfortable with it. . . . Your post seems to point up the distinction between having a good attitude towards technology and the fear and worry that many people have about the dangers that are possible,that lead them to turn their signs to NO. Maybe it's like New York City - there are dangers; it seems intimidating; we don't know enough about it to feel completely secure when planning a trip there - but the opportunities are breathtaking, and you can't just live as though New York City didn't exist. You would miss so much! Everyone in this group is open to the idea of visiting New York City, which is a great thing!

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  77. I am Barb Peres from East Porter County School. In teaching Middle and High School Family and Consumer Science & Algebra, I see a need to educate students to be more mindful of the risks and responsibility's of the digital society we live in. While students believe they are knowledgeable, they are often naive. Many don't realize the consequences of what they post, or following an unsafe link. Finding accurate and credible information is often difficult, and many students don't critically analyze their findings. While students my be proficient in using technology for entertainment they struggle to use it for educational or professional uses. I hope to become more informed and able to help my students.

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  78. Hello. I am Amy Thomas and I teach in Fort Wayne at Maple Creek Middle School. We are part of Nortwest Allen County Schools. I am starting my third full year here after taking 13 years off to be with my children. I teach the honors (pre-ap) English to 6th graders. I am excited about this book club as our school is going 1:1 in the fall for the secondary students. I am also in the throes of parenting three girls who are in the thick of creating their own digital footprint as they are in 11th, 9th and 7th grade. My students will benefit the most by me having a better grasp because I can then help them better see real-world risks and benefits. Having children who are in this age group will be good too. I can use my own kids as examples. I feel like the more comfortable I am with discussing digital matters, the more comfortable the students will be too. Also, there are times when teachers are not familiar with a subject matter and rather than admit that, they shy away from it for fear of leading students down the wrong path (or for fear of looking dumb). I do not want to be such a teacher. This digital world is real and it is something I never had to consider when I was my students' age. I want to send them out of my class knowing how to write . . . and knowing what to write and post in the digital realm.

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    1. With three teenage daughters, you have a great resource and a unique perspective within your own home. I have learned a lot from my own children about technology and social media. They and my students have often been the reason that I have forced myself to check out many facets of pop culture that would not be my first preference for music, movies, tv, etc., however, I do want to know what they know. Enjoy the good times.

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  79. Hi, I am Kelly from Geist Elementary in HSES where I am a school librarian/media specialist. Since I am old enough not to have grown up with technology, the whole social media aspect of digital citizenship is totally frightening to me. I avoid it completely. Susan Bearden's book tells me that I do not have to fear social media. I need to participate in it to: 1)connect with other educators who might collaborate with me and 2)help children learn the polite and appropriate way to connect. I never thought of developing a purposefully positive digital footprint. What a great idea! By becoming more literate, I can feel safer about my own digital citizenship and how I support my students.

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    1. Hello to a fellow school librarian/media specialist!! Don't forget you have a great network through AISLE. I'd love to connect and help you as you join in social media. :-) There are so many great education communities on social media. I'd be lost without them!

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  80. Hello, I am Tammy Farlow from Southwood Jr. Sr. High School, MSD Wabash County. I teach 8th grade math, Spanish, and Exploring World Languages (7th grade quarter rotation). This is the fifth year that our school district has been 1:1 in all grades. This year I have a newly adopted math online curriculum, and we have used an online Spanish program for a couple of years now. Throughout the years, I cobbled together tools and materials online where and when I could. Having taught for 20+ years without much technology, I prefer to blend in technology when I am comfortable; however, I have become more brave about having students use tools of which I have only a vague understanding, encouraging them to sail away on their own.

    The benefit for me and my students becoming more literate about digital citizenship is creative credit and copyright. This component is often ignored because it takes time to attribute credit, and it is justified among educators due to lack of funds to pay for materials and the abundance of information readily available on the internet. The ease of acquiring material and information online has quickly made for some bad habits for students and teachers that violate digital citizenship code. Even as I type this, I think to myself, not that controversy again, as it has been hashed out in other book blogs and rationalized by most of us. However, I notice it appears again in Bearden's digital citizenship categories, and something so easily abused is not going to go away.

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  81. Hello, my name is Karie Lavanchy. I am an elementary teacher at Eastbrook Community Schools. Digitial citizenship is becoming an important part of our world. My hope through this book study is to gain more insight into helping students become more responsible with their use of technology. Many students are so eager to use technology in the classroom that they do not always make the best choices. I want to learn ways that will help them become responsible citizens both inside and outside of the classroom.

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    1. My BIL works for Eastbrook, and his sons are going in 1st and 3rd grade. Watch out for those Berryhill boys! LOL

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  82. Hi, I am Connie McDaniel and I teach 4th grade at Stalker Elementary in Bedford, IN. I have been a part of a coalition that has developed a 4th grade anti-bully curriculum for the North Lawrence Community Schools. Although we do address cyber-bullying, I am interested in how this book will assist with teaching kids more about the permanence and harm created through the various social media platforms. Our elementary schools will be moving to 1:1 technology in two years, so I am hoping to prepare students to be good digital citizens before we give them their own Chromebook. I would also like to assist students with better research skills, especially in terms of discerning accurate information, and how to properly cite and acknowledge their sources.
    Digital citizenship must now be included in our regular character development. It is our job to not only teach the children good digital citizenship, but also educate their parents as they are the students' first teacher.

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    1. I agree with you, Connie. We have to teach the parents too. The students get home and see their parents doing things online and then think it's fine. It will be interesting to see how this book covers that topic of how to educate the parents. Our school usually does not have a good turnout for parent events so hopefully other ideas will be presented.

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  83. Hi, I am Amanda Rowe and I primarily teach 9th grade at Harrison High School in West Lafayette, IN. Teaching in a school that has 1:1 technology has many benefits but also has many challenges. While I already have a full curriculum, I have noticed a need to incorporate digital citizenship. Although these students have already been exposed to various forms of technology throughout their lives, there is a definite need at this stage in their development to marry digital citizenship with character development. Understanding the consequences of their actions online is not something that most teens think about as often as they should. I hope to instill in my students the understanding that technology, when used as it should be, is an excellent addition to gaining a better education.

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    1. Hi Amanda, nice to see another TSC teacher here! I'm sure there are more but with the volume of responses, it is hard to keep up!! I wish we were 1:1 (sort-of)! I see benefits of it but drawbacks as well. No matter the age, digital citizenship with character development is vital!!

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  84. Hello! I am the new Innovation & Media Services Specialist for Whitley County Consolidated Schools. I'll be split time between Columbia City HS and Indian Springs Middle School. We have 4 elementaries with media assistants in all 6 buildings that I train. I am excited as I will still be able to assist with building reading communities and research while also working with teachers and students on integrating technology with our new 1:1 chromebooks.

    Digital citizenship is a natural part of the librarian's role. Being a first adopter for technology and the lead on helping with research, I find myself working DigCitz skills into nearly all my lessons. Another part of my official role is helping the district with a digital citizens plan of action. I just learned about the opportunity to become certified and really hope my district will allow me and a few others to take the lead. In the meantime, I look forward to finally reading Susan's book and discussing it with you all. Susan has been a great mentor on the use of twitter professionally as well as other edtech areas.

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  85. My name is Sheila Hurst. I am a Specialized Instructional Assistant at Huntingburg Elementary School. My classroom has developed into a STEM Robotics Lab; however, in addition to STEM Robotics I also teach fine motor skills and handwriting, Accelerated Math and Language Arts, Remedial Math and Language Arts to students in grades K-4. Our school corporation is working towards becoming 1:1. On the morning of the PowerEd Up conference at Perry Central, I began reading Digital Citizenship: A Community-Based Approach. Keynote speaker, Kevin Honeycutt, spoke about designing your 'Digital Legacy'. Within the first few minutes of speaking, he suggested that kids are raising themselves in a digital world and no one is on duty! I quickly flipped back through chapter one thinking to myself the winds of change are blowing.The world as I had known it had revised itself, and I have to make a choice to be a leader...a leader dedicated to teaching our young people to being digitally responsible citizens. My hope is that through this book and these conversations to be empowered as a Digital Citizen and leader in a digital world.

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  86. I'm a former English high school teacher who has worked most recently as a special education aide and now as a substitute teacher in the MSD of Martinsville. I usually only sub at the high school since that is where I had worked before. I'm working on renewing my license in the hopes that I could ever get a teaching job again. I'm very interested in technology and teaching students right from wrong. I see students abusing social media to bully other students and to be obnoxious, which I know will hurt their reputations later on. I remember telling one student that posting vulgar things was not nice, but she didn't care. I feel pretty good about learning some of the things I've read in the first chapter, but it always good to learn more and let it keep soaking in. Even as a sub, I will be subbing at the high school where they are going one to one and getting Chromebooks this year. I thought this book was very timely and one that ought to be shared with the district.

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    1. Wow Michele, I am impressed that as a substitute/aid that you are volunteering your time to participate in this book study!! It takes a village and your district is blessed to have you!

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  87. Hello everyone! My name is Tom Stoner and I am the principal for Kouts MS/HS in Kouts. This is the 4th or 5th book study I have participated in. I find as much value in all the comments as I do from reading the books, so I thank you all for your insights in advance.
    I think one of the most valuable things about teaching digital citizenship to our students is to protect them. From others as well as from themselves. I tell all of our students that colleges, universities, employers, etc are all googling them to find out what their digital presence is like. I explain to them that I too google all perspective employees to see if they match what the school is trying to do. I tell the students it is not necessarily a digital footprint, but more like a digital tattoo. I believe it was George Couros the I first heard call it that.

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    1. Students cannot hear that college admissions counselors and employers google applicants too many times. Despite telling them this, I think some students think adults are incapable of navigating social media to find them. They are very visible.

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  88. Hi, everyone! I’m Cassie Bever and I teach 9th and 10th grade English at North Montgomery High School in Crawfordsville, IN.

    I think digital citizenship and literacy has become an increasingly important topic that needs to be taught and addressed at school, home, and within our personal lives. I especially think it’s important to pair these skills with character education as mentioned in chapter one as well as understanding tone and context. Students need help assessing their audience when it comes to written content as well as just knowing HOW to communicate digitally. A HUGE part of our communication is nonverbal and is paired with body language, facial expressions, and tone, all of which becomes more difficult to convey digitally. Students need to understand how to approach varying situations in regards to tone and context in order to convey their ideas and thoughts without being misinterpreted or possibly damaging their online reputation.

    Another issue I seem to run into at the high school level is a lack of digital citizenship skills that ends up taking away from our time with the core content we are trying to cover. I teach both a research paper unit with my freshman as well as a persuasive speech unit with my sophomores and I continually see students struggle with wading through and finding credible sources and avoiding plagiarism, mostly because they haven’t been taught yet HOW to navigate the digital world and use information appropriately. We really have to start this navigation process from the beginning and review digital citizenship material (such as plagiarism and credible sources) in depth before we even get to the research and writing aspect of the project. As students are exposed to digital context earlier in their lives, they need to be taught digital citizenship skills BEFORE they reach high school in an attempt to save us time that could be spent on content rather than digital literacy. In addition to maximizing our learning time, the earlier we teach these skills the more likely students are able to avoid some of the nasty consequences of misusing the internet, social media, text, email, etc. mentioned in chapter one.

    I look forward to reading more about this topic as well as everyone's thoughts and experiences seeing as it seems so complex and difficult to approach!

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    1. I agree with Cassie Bever's statement concerning the need for students to understand digital citizenship before entering high school. I also think of the safety concerns associated with this citizenship, and how sooner, rather than later, is a good idea.

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  89. Hello I am Joe Poteet I will be teaching US History and Mass Media at North Montgomery High School my 22nd year of teaching.
    I agree with most of you here the lack of digital citizenship skills is affecting the way students learn in a very negative way. I think it is sad that students don't actually talk to each other and learn face to face communication. Instead they learn social media to social media communication. I do include a research paper in my classes and the plagiarism and lack of real sources is unbelievable. Students don't understand anyone can put anything on the internet that doesn't make it true. I hope this book will show ways to help foster better digital citizenship in my classes.

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    1. Joe, I feel your pain! As an English teacher, it is sometimes unbelievable that students will try to get by with plagiarizing a paper - especially after I've described to them how I can spot it! Yet, they try to take the fastest route to being "finished." I try to impress upon students that using laptops ARE a shortcut, a library at their fingertips, but shortcuts in thinking, writing, researching, citing, and editing, usually make for a poor paper, and thus, a poor grade.

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  90. Hi! I'm Carrie Strain. I teach 3rd grade at Roachdale Elementary. In our corporation (North Putnam) we are not 1:1 so I feel digital citizenship is not a topic that has been addressed much, at least at the elementary level. I have discussed small things with my students, such as not everything online is accurate and that they have to evaluate the websites they are using, but I feel we need to do a lot more. Technology has evolved so much that almost every family has internet access at home and digital citizenship skills are becoming more important than ever even for our youngest students. I hope through this book to learn ways of addressing digital citizenship not only with my students but also with their families as well.

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    1. Carrie,
      I believe our school is about the same. We have not really shed too much light onto this subject. I agree with the Author that the approach needs to be "Community" family has to be involved as well. So many parents need to learn these same skills (myself included, which is what I hope to do now).

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  91. Hello, I am Jill Deputy, I am a High School Assistant Principal. We are a one to one program and we have been using computers and other media for a while now. It is a growing issue with being a good citizen AND a good digital citizen. I am always looking for ideas about how we can make each student realize the importance of your digital footprint. I want my families to also be involved in this learning project.

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  92. Hello! My name is Misty Cooney, and I am a third grade teacher at Greensburg Elementary. I feel it is important that I increase my knowledge in the area of digital citizenship, so I can effectively teach my students. Students need to be taught how to use technology in an appropriate and safe manner and understand the consequences when technology is misused.

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  93. I am Kathleen Carter, a Special Education teacher from Roosevelt Middle School, Twin Lakes School Corporation. I am beginning this new school year by incorporating the use of technology into almost every lesson that I will be teaching. I was inspired to utilize technology more often in my classroom after reading The Innovative Mindset by George Couros. One of the activities my students will participate in is a class blogging site, so I know that it is important to stress etiquette, including the responsibility of discussion with personal dignity and also showing respect toward others. Outside of our classroom, it is important to make my students aware of safety issues. The benefits of digital citizenship are the same as the benefits of good citizenship in any environment, because this allows participants to contribute in the most positive manner.

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  94. Hi, my name is Katie Nuest and I am a kindergarten teacher at Washington Twp. Elementary School in Valparaiso, IN. I feel that everything within school and citizenship begins with kindergarten. If I can introduce my students into becoming good citizens in the real world and the digital world, it will help shape the path of their future. Also, it is important to teach the young ones, first hand, the appropriate way to use technology.

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    1. I totally agree. Getting them started young makes it more a part of the fabric of their education and the people that they are becoming.

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    2. I agree with what you wrote Katie, but as kids grow older teachers must continue to educate their students in digital citizenship. It can't begin and end in kindergarten. I also think parents need to be more proactive in their children's digital citizenships. Both parents and teachers need to lead the way and be good examples of proper digital citizenship to children.

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    3. Katie,

      I agree 100% that it should start in Kindergarten from the school side of learning. I taught Kindergarten before being moved up to 5th grade. The habits that started in Kindergarten were carried into 1st grade, if the 1st grade teachers continued those traits.... imagine how well prepared our students would be by MS and HS. I think of how well they have memorized the school pledge by the end of K and know it by heart all the way through 5th grade. Same idea with Digital Citizenship concepts if everyone presented them in a similar fashion.

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  95. My name is Erin Mauch and I teach Third grade at Canterbury School in Fort Wayne, IN. Digital citizenship is,so important to our ever changing world. It is so easy for these kids to say things that they wouldn't normally say on social media. Well I haven't seen it in the elementary school, I have seen it in our Middle School. I think it's important to start them young learning what is appropriate and not appropriate online. While I wish this could be something taught by parents, I don't think many parents understand digital citizenship.

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  96. My name is Erin Mauch and I teach Third grade at Canterbury School in Fort Wayne, IN. Digital citizenship is,so important to our ever changing world. It is so easy for these kids to say things that they wouldn't normally say on social media. Well I haven't seen it in the elementary school, I have seen it in our Middle School. I think it's important to start them young learning what is appropriate and not appropriate online. While I wish this could be something taught by parents, I don't think many parents understand digital citizenship.

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  97. Hello! My name is Caroline Crow and I just moved back to 3rd grade from 1st at South Whitley Elementary in South Whitley, IN. My school put in place 1 to 1 at the beginning of last year and while I felt confident using it with 1st graders, I am nervous of "uping" my game for my 3rd graders this year. I believe that both myself and my students would benefit in me becoming more literate in digital citizenship as it would open doors that didn't exsist to begin with. I feel as though digital citizenship helps create genius ideas that people are able to connect through the internet and have access to information that previously they were unable to obtain. The internet has become such a large daily reality that I agree, the basics of internet safety must begin with the kindergarten teachers. My community has a small population of Amish, whom do not have need for technology and who lack the teaching/learning at home. I feel as though as educators, we need to set the standards bar high when it comes to technology in order for students to understand the full impact they have in the digital world.

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  100. My name is Sharon Marich. I was a 2nd grade teacher at Wheatfield Elementary for 11 years. This upcoming school year I will be teaching 1st grade at Demotte Elementary (Kankakee Valley School Corp). This will be the first year the entire school corporation will have 1 to 1 devices for the students. The benefit of my becoming more literate on digital citizenship is that I will be better educated in order to accurately teach my students how to be the best digital citizens possible. I plan on starting out the beginning of the year with teaching digital citizenship. I firmly believe that before my students even touch any device at school, I need to educate them in digital citizenship.

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    1. Sharon I think it is a great idea to discuss the importance of digital citizenship and how that will look in your classroom prior to bringing out the devices. This is something I plan to do as well with the incoming 5th graders. I have a set of iPads, and would love to start with lessons on those right out of the gate, but knowing they understand digital citizenship, rules and procedures and the importance of what going on the internet in our classroom means is SO important to me.Good Luck!

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  101. ood Morning All…..

    My name is Amanda King, I am going to be a 5th grade teacher at Morton Elementary School (School City of Hammond).

    In becoming more literate about digital citizenship my students and I will be able to start the year off with meaningful discussions about how to be digitally aware of our computer/internet intentions. We will be able to make goals to leave a digital footprint that has a positive impact. I am looking forward to all the ideas from the book and others through discussion on how to help students and where to go myself.

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  102. Hello! My name is Trina Thomas. I'm currently an instructional assistant for reading at Floyds Knobs Elementary, and I work with 1st and 3rd grade students. Previously, I was a kindergarten teacher (for 4 years) and hold an Indiana teaching certification for preschool through 6th grade.

    I'm interested and excited to learn more about digital citizenship. Digital learning is such an important part of today's education system, as well as a big part of how we socialize on a daily basis. I worry about my 7 year old son and how this will impact his learning, self-image, and relationships as he grows up in this digital world. I'm hoping to gain skills and knowledge regarding digital citizenship for myself, my students, and my son.

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  103. Hello, my name is Lisa Lozano, and I am beginning my second year of teaching 8th-grade English at St. Barnabas Catholic School in Indianapolis. (Previously, I taught middle school and high school English in public schools for over 20 years.) During my last few years of public-school teaching, my students and I had a great experience using 1:1 technology for research, composition, and test prep. However, I often saw students struggle with the distractions and temptations of online technology. Now at St. Barnabas, I am able to help students stay much more focused as we work in computer labs, and as I assign specific apps and sites for enrichment and homework.

    I've seen many technology initiatives come and go. Sometimes, I have seen technology dominate the curriculum and substitute for substance. My goal in becoming more literate in digital citizenship is to help students use technology efficiently, effectively, and respectfully. I want to make sure that students are using technology in a way that prioritizes the academic skills and content of our class. I especially want students to remember that technology has a greater purpose of communication and service.

    While digital, automated, and virtual technologies are exciting and are dramatically changing the way we work and live, students need to remember the human scale and true purpose of our endeavors. Above all, as more and more of our lives enter the cloud, I want to do my best to help students stay safe.

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  104. Hi--My name is Amanda Sutter. I have taught the past 18 years at St. Joseph Catholic School-Decatur in the Ft. Wayne/South Bend Diocese. I previously taught second grade, but now teach middle school.

    We are very fortunate here at St. Joe to be digitally connected and use technology in many ways to benefit our students. However, there are many aspects of technology that seem to move faster than my learning curve. Students are savvy...and in order to stay connected and relevant to them, it's crucial that I stay up on all current trends.

    It's so important to teach students respect, boundaries and dangers with technology. I feel that my students may not even understand the term "Digital Citizenship" without going into depth. It's vital that schools and parents alike educate our students about technology as is it a major part of their lives now. I hope to use the knowledge gained from this book to open the discussion of digital citizenship with my students.

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