Monday, October 12, 2015

Ditch That Textbook Week 6: Ditch That Textbook Part 2

In our reading today, Matt talked a lot about utilizing videos in the classroom. Are you creating videos to use in your teaching or are your students creating videos to share their learning? If so, what are you using to create your videos? Or have you found good videos online? What else did you find meaningful in these chapters?

Representatives from the IDOE Office of eLearning will be at the ICE Conference this week. If you are attending, please stop by our booth and say hi or attend one of our sessions. Also, if you are attending the conference you will have many opportunities to attend sessions with Matt Miller.

We only have two weeks left in the book club discussion. Next week we will be reading and discussing chapters 34-38. 

126 comments:

  1. I have no created videos in my classroom yet. I plan on using screencastify for when I have a sub or when we are doing an activity that requires a lot of directions. This way the students may go back and watch the video as many times as they need to. This frees up some time for me to actually help students instead of repeating directions.

    In my Language Arts class the students have created videos for a "Book Commercial". I don't like the same old book report method, so they have 30 seconds to "sell" the rest of the class on a book they have read this quarter. It holds them accountable without the groaning that may come along with the term "book report". Also, it is less intimidating for students that do not like getting up in front of the class or writing papers.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I also have been thinking making videos like this for the same scenarios...except I hadn't thought of the students who are present and just having trouble with directions. This would be fantastic so I'm not repeating myself 10 times a class period.

      Delete
    2. I have used Youtube and Learn 360 videos to help in my classroom. I found Youtube videos with Capital & States vidoes. I really like the book report videos. I will try that.
      I have also considered recording lessons for substitutes when I am gone. I have students with special needs and change is difficult for them so instruction from me on videos are helpful.

      Delete
    3. I am on Maternity leave currently and have been trying new screen casting tools. I JUST USED Screencastify this week and loved it! It was fast and I like that the students see my screen and me if I want them too! I also love the quick export/upload to youtube. Check my samples out: http://www.mrsburman.com/2015/10/week-10-game-plan.html

      Delete
    4. I love the video book report idea! This would have been so fun with my 4th graders last year! Actually, I could still work it in with high school kids;)

      Delete
    5. Similar to your book report video, I have mine make a book trailer to advertise the book to their peers.

      Delete
    6. I recently had the kids use Screencastify to record themselves reading a certain chapter in the novel we are reading as a class. During reading days in class, I play their recordings and they are able to hear each other read and also see the pdf with the words while they are reading. This also works out wonderful when I have a substitute on a reading day, I am able to upload the recordings onto Google classroom and the students can listen to the assigned chapters independently with headphones in the computer lab.
      My students used my IPad to record our school building and different, unique things around the school. We edited the videos and put them into a video creator and emailed it to our pen pals to introduce them to our school! The kids loved it and it helped with visuals as opposed to just writing about our school in our letters.

      Delete
  2. I also have made "book report" videos with my students. They enjoy the creativity they get to show as well as not having to perform in front of their peers. They love it, I love it, and they are pretty easy to grade with a rubric.
    After reading these chapters, I realized the importance of videos within the classroom. They are a wonderful way to get students more motivated to learn the material. Before this reading, I would use videos to introduce a lesson. I'd show a video of a spider spinning a web if we were reading a story about spiders, a rap about multiplication to get the kids interested in multiplication, or a clip of the place we were going on our field trip to "pre-visit" a location. While these resources were great, a lot of the time I had to be like an archeologist and dig super deep to find what I was looking for and then it still wasn't exactly what I wanted. I am really looking forward to having the kids (and myself) create some video content for my upcoming lessons.
    Another thing that impacted me in this week's reading was the paragraph that read: "We can't make students use their time wisely; that decision will always have to be their choice. I'm reminded of the phrase "No Child Left Behind." It's a noble concept, but I've always compared it to a child at a bus stop who refuses to get on the bus. Getting on the bus is his decision; we can only help him make a good decision." I have been really struggling with a few students this year who never turn in their homework/projects and waste good class time to be working on these things. This quote really hit me in the face this week. I can't spend a million hours trying to get them to do the things they are never going to do. I can only encourage them to do their assignments. By incorporating many of these "Ditch" ideas, hopefully these students will be inspired to do their work and actually learn the material. I am using some of my fall break time to figure out what is going to work in my classroom. I can't wait!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I LOVE your analogy about the child getting on the bus. Heck, I even have MUSIC and GRAPHICS and ENERGY emanating from our classroom bus, and some kids STILL don't get ON! I think we all experience this frustration.

      Delete
    2. Great analogies about the bus and feeling like an archaeologist!

      Delete
    3. I love the analogy of getting the kid on the bus. I wholeheartedly agree that you cannot make a student learn.

      Delete
  3. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Using videos in my classroom has been nonexistent up until this point. The students really enjoy watching the whiteboard animations in class. I need to work on finding a way to incorporate that into my classroom. I need to use it to make my life easier. Rather than repeating myself every hour in a day the students can watch a lesson or directions and can re-watch it at home. It would also be helpful for those students that are absent. I especially need to have students create products with animations as well. My own children love videotaping and playing with the speed and audio. This can easily be used in a project based assessment. My students also love watching John Green Crash Course clips. I need to use that as a model for what they can produce in demonstrating what they know about a certain concept.

    One thing I learned from this week's reading is to just "jump in" and try. The students will learn how it can work with me. With all the frustrations that may come in the beginning, we will benefit in the end.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm here with you- I use a lot of videos and clips, and students adore them- but it just akes SO much time to create that I haven't tried it yet with the kids.

      Delete
    2. Time is so precious and short in supply. However, I keep thinking that the time I spend now will come back to me in the future when I have the videos already made and ready to use. I need to get creative about finding that extra time now.

      Delete
  5. I have been using videos in my classroom for the last couple of years. I have had a good mentor in teaching me to use technology in my classroom. A big shout out to Kyle Kline. Thanks! Anyways, with my American Sign Language class that I am teaching this year, I have been making my own videos for the students to watch and they are making their own videos for me to grade them on.
    I also teach math, and have found really good videos online. Khan Academy and Virutal Nerd.

    I too learned, that if you just try it, you will make mistakes, but you will only teach your students to continue to try and to work through the frustrations. Not everything works out perfectly, but given a good try, you might just learn something.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I do create videos for my classroom. I started by creating cooking demonstrations to show the students the steps they would need to follow the next day for cooking lab. I used an app from iTunes (not iMovie but I don't know what it was) to edit the videos and I put them on YouTube. This year I came up with a new project that we just finished in which students wrote a script, filmed, and edited a video over manners. We used WeVideo to edit them and while I loved the program I'm really disappointed there is an editing limit (5 minutes) so I wouldn't be able to have them use it for many things.

    I haven't done it yet, but I am looking to create screen casts for our upcoming elearning days this winter as well as for absent students. I do a lot of picture tutorials with screenshots so I feel this would be a simpler/smarter way to present the information. From reading comments on this blog I realized I can record multi-step directions for when students are confused at what to do as well....even if they are present in class!

    ReplyDelete
  7. One of the teachers in our building creates video lessons to leave for subs when she is out, which I think is a great idea! I am definitely going to look into doing this.

    I consider myself pretty tech-savvy, but I know my students know far more than I do. I continue to casually talk about tech issues they are interested in. Students love to show teachers how to do things. I've actually even considered having students "teach" a lesson on various computer programs, websites, etc. I could then house all of these videos online for students to access when they have questions.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have used Educreations to create teaching videos for sub days and love that I don't have to wait to move my upper level classes along. No lost instruction days! I can also post the video link through Classroom with any other documents, notes, or information they might need. One stop shopping!

      I recently let my upper level students create grammar how-to videos for my level ones. They primarily used PowToon and GoAnimate, both of which are free and allow them to record audio to accompany their videos. They made some content mistakes (naturally), but they clearly presented the meaning and value behind their topics- and the videos were hysterical!

      Delete
  8. When I use videos I use Youtube. Eventually I would like to create my own so I can teach my class virtually if I am not well one day. I also would like to do like my principal does and record myself reading books to the class.

    ReplyDelete
  9. To provide flipped lessons for 8th grade math I have made several videos using Quicktime. I prefer to make my own as I can focus on specific processes and skills thereby avoiding extraneous material in prepared videos online and eliminating additional confusion for the general level math student. On the other hand, I also teach a high school Spanish class, and there are several well-prepared videos available online, including those from a digital program to which our students subscribe for a small fee (Voces by Teacher's Discovery).

    When I have students create videos, most of them use iMovie. The truth is I know nothing about this system. I give them some guidelines for their content and parameters for accomplishing their task. Generally, they work in pairs or small groups, so I confirm that someone in each group has a knowledge of recording and editing, then they fly with it; when I confirm that they have those capabilities, they usually look at me with the 'who doesn't know that?' glance. This is how I have learned to do many things with technology, and I am glad it hasn't stopped me from letting the students have the experiences.

    ReplyDelete
  10. I need to just try it as Matt says to do. I have used videos in my class from other sources, such as Youtube, Learn 360 and from workshops. I want to have my students create some to use and share with others. I have incorporated sketching in my classroom when note taking. It is very helpful to my students who struggle with paying attention and focusing. We started with doodles and now use it to make concrete connections to new information.
    I need to use my students' knowledge in technology to blossom.

    ReplyDelete
  11. I use videos a few times a week. I've created my own videos to flip my classroom, but with the lack of technology at home for many students, it was an epic fail. I've had my students create videos-- one you teach them basics, it's amazing what they can do. And they really grow and flourish when they have that free reign with technology.

    ReplyDelete
  12. I have used videos in my class. I often use YouTube to support my content. I also have students make videos to show understanding. Chatterpix Kids is an app that allows them to record their voice over a picture. It is a fun way to have a character from Social Studies or from a novel come to life. I have also used Adobe Voice for sharing writing and as a "Get to Know you Activity."

    I find that my students really enjoy making videos and do a pretty good job at it!

    ReplyDelete
  13. I haven’t used student recordings of video for a long time in my Spanish class. It was all so easy when it was the big camcorder with a vhs tape on a tripod! This year I plan on having students try making their own videos again with the new technology, maybe making a puppet show in Spanish as our first try. I have no idea how to do it nor what to use, but in the spirit of jumping in and trying, we will soon jump in and try. What would be the best way to do it?

    As far as using videos for instruction I have found many good Spanish lessons online. Mostly I use these clips for reinforcement of grammar concepts. (Sometimes I use music videos in Spanish for vocabulary activities.) Señor Jordan is the king of Spanish videos, in my opinion. He is funny, his information is correct, and his accent is good. There is a lot of boring garbage out there too, so I preview a lot of videos to find the good ones. I post videos I use in class on Google Classroom so students have easy access and can rewatch them. An interesting side effect of posting video clips on Google Classroom the night before we use them is that my go-getters are very curious about what I have planned for the next day, so they are watching these clips before I even say to do so.

    ReplyDelete
  14. I have students prepare various types of video projects during the course of the year. For "Beowulf", my seniors did a video montage using i-movie with music and original narration. The assignment was to pick a person from Time magazine's list of 100 People of the Century and illustrate why that person deserves to be remembered. Later in the year, my seniors will create a social satire video as part of our satire unit.

    ReplyDelete
  15. I have done two videos this year. I did my first one right before school started and sent it to the teachers. It was a replacement for the meeting we usually have on their first day of school. That way they watched the video before hand, we answered any questions they had at lunch, and then they had the day to work in their rooms. The second one I did was for the students to front load a discussion we were having that day on Todaysmeet. I used youtube for both videos and then sent out the link to it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The video at the beginning of the year was genius! It cut down on unnecessary time in a meeting and it was something we could go back to if we needed to if we missed something. Thanks for always being willing to try new things!

      Delete
    2. The beginning of the year video sounds GREAT! I travel to two different buildings in our corporation currently, and it would be great to watch videos and have the day to work versus travelling back and forth to various first day meetings!

      Delete
  16. As a media specialist I do not have much opportunity to use or create videos. However, I do know many teachers in our corporation find videos helpful in the classroom. I have used YouTube with students and faculty to share book talks, lectures, etc. but nothing original. Hopefully this will be something I can do in the future as my library evolves digitally.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. As a media specialist, a goal I have this year is to create a 'maker space' for students to be creative. I want to use legos as a way to get kids reading (books about lego cities, creation, etc), problem-solving, communicating, etc. My plan is to write a grant to have a lego table to do these things. Students would video themselves discussing what they created on the lego table and giving a challenge to other students to add on to their creation. After they make their video, we would create a QR code we would post at the table so other students can scan the code and watch the video, then accept the challenge! This is one way I think technology could be added into a library setting!

      Delete
    2. I LOVE the idea of having a lego table in the learning commons. This would be a fantastic way to get students energized about reading and problem solving. I think it could also be really cool to have students start a project and then other students could add to it, almost like a Minecraft world but students would get to interact and socialize face to face instead of through a screen. You could even set up theme months and see how they use that to create a new build.

      Delete
    3. Would love to collaborate with you on this, Ashley!! I love your ideas!

      Delete
  17. I love educreations as a way for students to make videos to show what they are learning. It's great that now it's web based as well as an app. I like that the students can now edit their videos, do voice over, add pictures, drawings, and text. It's a tool that can be used over and over again for multiple reasons. I also love iMovie for students to use in creation of projects- so simple and creative. We run into issues with storage space on iPads, etc when using that though.

    I love YouTube and I have heard about TeacherTube-- I haven't used that as much- doesn't seem as helpful for elementary classrooms. Has anyone had any luck with that? I also love BrainPop for great elementary videos as well!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. http://blog.mrmeyer.com/

      Awesome math guy who has videos for problem solving in math. A great way to bring in the math process standards using videos!

      Delete
    2. I am working to find a way to make my students research more purposeful. Educreations sounds like something that could help. I am trying to let the students have a little more choice during the day and I am letting them find answers to those life questions. For example I have two boys that are researching spiders right now. I want them to do something with what they are learning. They keep coming to me with did you know.... and I want them to have other options besides just writing about it. Maybe if they are using their writing to create something on educreations, it would be much more motivating.

      Delete
    3. I'll have to check out that math site Hilary. Thanks for suggesting it. Kathy, I would love to learn Educreations. Maybe we do a cross grade level research project later in the year. :)

      Delete
    4. Let me know when you are ready to start trying educreations!!

      Delete
    5. I am planning on using educreations later this year to have my kids make learning videos to send to another kindergarten room in West Virginia. I've yet to mess around on it to much but when I have used it it seems very simple! I can't wait to see what they can do!

      Delete
  18. I love using videos to augment my music lessons! Every once in a while, it is a special treat for my students to watch a YouTube video demonstrating the song that we are working on in class. I also love to take video on my phone and record my students working. I email the video to my school computer and then I can show it to my students (usually the next class period.)

    I value having these samples videos of my students working, because I can share video lessons with other music teachers--even show substitute teachers how a particular game goes. A video is worth a billion words when it comes to explaining how an elementary general music lesson is supposed to go! (Especially to a non-music sub.)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I love that you use videos to show how a game is to be played! That make so much sense to me! It would cut down on direction time as well as questions. I can see myself doing this with my kids to show other teachers as well as classes in the future! Awesome! Thanks!

      Delete
  19. I haven't made my own videos very often- a couple of times I have used my document camera or SMARTboard video camera to tape a lesson step by step so that absent students could follow, but that's it. And I haven't had students do a video yet in class for me- I tried it many years ago when I taught Spanish and it was time consuming and didn't turn out well. Maybe it's time for me to try it again- my students I'm sure would LOVE to make videos, being middle schoolers and life is all about THEM!

    ReplyDelete
  20. Hello everyone! I am currenlty on maternity leave and I have been utilizing videos of myself and helpful content a lot! I have used simple iMovie on my iPhone when in a pinch (like when I went into labor over a week early and my students and sub needed help) and interactive videos using TouchCast on my iPad that I embed on my website. I more recently (SUNDAY) used Screencastify as an extension in my Chrome and that was the easiest thing to use so far. The lessons run roughly 2-6minutes and are mostly my face and screen. The students and sub love the videos and I think it really helps my students. Plus it shows them I am still invested and has helped them also stay invested.

    As far as helpful content, YouTube is the place. As a language arts educator I don't want love videos or ones that give away TOO much of the plot, so I stick with 60second Recap (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-k8enjbXIksN4WE22u-R7A) and CrashCourse (https://www.youtube.com/user/crashcourse) as my favorites. Both have literature and history, but CrashCourse has tons of math and science as well! Check them out.

    Students making videos hmm.., well when I was at an iPad school, we made videos in iMovie ALL THE TIME! I now at a ChromeBook school and haven't really played with the idea yet. Anyone at a GAFE school and still having students make videos? Note: I taught Speech/Debate for 5 years and would always tape one speech and have them watch and critique. This was by far the most helpful tool for my students growth as a speaker.

    Here are some videos from past classes that students have made:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=17qlMKTrdFY

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VXL7i_t2pAI

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UNYihAp8S1I

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Also - if you would like to see my videos of lessons visit my website - www.mrsburman.com

      Delete
  21. I do not make my own videos. In my field there are great offerings available from John Green and Keith Hughes, so often if I need something, I can find it already created. I do have my kids make videos. We use I-movie a lot to make PSA announcements, news broadcasts and movie trailers and I use Powtoons too. They like the animation effects offered by Powtoon. I like that both modems can be shared with a broader audience, and the kids like to watch each other's work.

    ReplyDelete
  22. I use screencasatify to make videos for my class. I use them to introduce special projects. I put them on my web page so they can watch them if they are absent. I also use them for substitute plans. My subs always comment on how easy their day was because they don't have to worry about delivering content. I also know my students will get the correct information and what I want the kids to complete gets done.
    I also use Edpuzzle. It allows me to stop a video and ask questions, take a poll and keep track of all answers. It is a GREAT tool! I also have my kids do screen casts of their projects.

    ReplyDelete
  23. I have not created videos in my room (gym) because my students would not be able to view them. However, some of the teachers have used videos in their classroom for PBL projects. I would love to some day to make and use videos in my classroom.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Our PE teacher has recently decided to create some exercise related videos for the students to do at home on the days we have eLearning. That may be something to start with!

      Delete
    2. I work at the same school as Gail. We created a video for ISTEP during music last school year. A lot of students can NOT be photographed/in a video because their parents have signed that they cannot. Some classes have used my video camera for PBL projects, but again many had to be left out. Many teachers just prefer to be on the safe side and just not tape because of how many are not allowed.

      Delete
  24. I have never created videos to use in my classroom; although, I have found and used some excellent ones. I have always wanted to allow my students to create their own videos, but I have never known where to start. Matt Miller gave some excellent suggestions that I think I might try soon.

    ReplyDelete
  25. I haven’t started making videos in my classroom. I’ve dabbled a bit with Blabberize for fun and Animoto for a special project, but I haven’t introduced them to students. As an E/LA/Reading teacher, I don’t feel like I can take the time to teach students how to create videos. Instead, I hitchhike off of the social studies teachers (who aren’t under the testing gun in my grade level) and reinforce the tech they have have taught the students. It may seem a bit whimpy of me, but my class time is valuable and my students aren’t yet tested on video making.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Johanna,
      I absolutely hear you when you're describing how time is so valuable in our classrooms! It definitely is! Thank you for that!

      Delete
  26. I LOVE Matt's mention of dual-coding theory! I am a BIG believer in that. I'm quite strong auditorily - not so much visual - but I definitely believe in the power of the visual. I also love how he talks about "Pictures ARE legitimate academic work." They are quite powerful and students need to be able to have time creating them!

    In my classroom, I do use videos I've created to help teach math. I DON'T enjoy watching them, but I've made several and the students are using them.

    The students use a few apps in our classroom. They have created some Powtoons and we use Popplet (students create graphic organizers on Popplet for a variety of topics), as well as the Explain Everything app. Explain Everything is an interactive whiteboard. The students do all the creating though and can save their work as a video.

    We also use a few other apps that are all handled by students and they create their work independently. The others are mainly "talking"/auditory. Audionote is one we use alot. For visual, it's mainly Popplet and Explain Everything.

    We mainly use these during the reading block, during reading stations, and during the precious little amount of social studies I've had time for this year. I have had students ask me to come in at recess to work on these creations, though. - AWESOME!

    ReplyDelete
  27. My classes really use video. We have used youtube had a General from West point talk to my students about Pickett's charge and the reasons for the civil war! I also use it to help introduce lessons I figure students like to watch videos so why not bring in some experts for my class. They do seem to watch and get information out of them. My students have also produced commercials over topics in history the latest was inventions. They all seem to enjoy this also and learn from them.
    I think videos are a good way to help teach into todays world.

    ReplyDelete
  28. I have used a variety of videos in my classroom. Scholastic has some interesting videos and virtual field trips that I have used time to time. I have used Popplet with students and they have presented their projects using this app. I use Brainpop for a variety of topics, they do a great job of explaining topics in a kid-friendly way. Last year my students used imovie to document the history of our school. The students were so excited to record interviews and pictures. They tore down the school and we have a brand new building so it was a great way for students to become the historians. Students also posted the videos on a classroom FB page.

    ReplyDelete
  29. I use YouTube videos most frequently in my classroom to practice daily review like days of the week/months of the year/letters/numbers-counting. I also use BrainPop Jr. videos to teach certain topics. One project I would like to do this year with my students is create a disability awareness video using imovie. I would have my students teach the rest of the school about their disabilities and abilities. I have made short movies using imovie, but I have not yet used it with my students. I also do a lot of life skills in my room and would like to create "how to" videos with steps on how to do things like wash dishes, take out trash, sweep, etc. with the students showing the steps. I could use imovie or flipagram to make these videos.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's a great idea Julie for disability awareness! I would love to have my class watch your videos that you have made! We would love to be your audience! I would also love to use your movies when we go on to do "how-tos" as well!

      Delete
    2. That's a great idea Julie for disability awareness! I would love to have my class watch your videos that you have made! We would love to be your audience! I would also love to use your movies when we go on to do "how-tos" as well!

      Delete
  30. My students are about to start their weather unit. As such, they will be learning about how to forecast the weather. So, they will have a project using all the information they've accumulated to create an actual weather report using a map and to record themselves forecasting the weather. To do this they will use a ziggi camera and screencastify.

    ReplyDelete
  31. I use a lot of youtube and brainpop videos in my classroom. They are a great way to introduce a topic. I also use youtube videos when introducing new vocab words. It really helps the students understand and remember the word and meaning if they see a video related to the word. They look forward to our vacab review each day.

    ReplyDelete
  32. Starting this school year, I began using YouTube a lot more. Last year, there were some technical difficulties, and I didn’t have very good access to online videos (especially through YouTube). Instead of showing full movies and taking a bunch of class time, I show ten minute clips (most of them are two minutes) of movies that have been made based on the literature we read. Showing students clips aligns with their shortened attention span due to the speed of information. “Making it visual” also reinforces and clarifies their comprehension of the text.

    Coming from a school corporation that still uses overhead projectors, technology to “jump in and try” is not readily available due to funding issues. If this technology were available and every student were to have a computer, I could see the benefit of using forums for discussion because many students do not want to speak in front of their peers in person but will do so online. Losing one student’s opinion or interpretation of the text takes away from our discussions.

    ReplyDelete
  33. I'm a Crash Course fan (understatement!) for videos within my History classroom, but they aren't always suitable for middle school students due to content and speed; I still use them but it takes prep work to prepare students since Crash Course World History was created based upon the AP framework. I really like the videos created by Ted-Ed Originals that I use to flip lessons or make eLearning assignments, they are often animated and very engaging looks at major topics in a variety of subject areas. I create short mini-lesson videos on my own using TouchCast, PowToon, iMovie... And I always give students choice during projects to create a video after I've modeled each of those in class. Students videos typically end up being better than mine...

    For those beginning, don't be afraid to just use Quicktime to create short instructional videos. That's where I started, and I still go back to that from time to time for the simplicity of it. Just be sure to lock your classroom door and put a sign that you are recording so you're not interrupted!

    ReplyDelete
  34. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  35. I had my students create book trailers using Animoto at the end of last year. This was such a great activity and a lot of fun for students. Now, I can show my current students book trailers to get them interested in books. My goal (for someday..) will be to use QR codes to attach book trailers to books in my classroom library or even the school library. I LOVE Animoto.. it is super easy to use and kids love it. You can make free videos up to 30 seconds, and if you subscribe (you can test for education for free) you can make up to about 10 minute videos (maybe longer!!).

    I use a lot of youtube. Flocabulary.com is an amazing resource for most subjects. This website creates rap songs on any topic you can imagine, and they are constantly creating new songs. The songs are catchy and really help the students remembers definitions and topics! Warning: They will get stuck in your head ALL day!!

    ReplyDelete
  36. I use Educreations with my students. I have kids make videos about what they have learned about a topic. They really get into it, and I teach kindergarten. The future of education looks bright if even a few of these children become teachers. I use online YouTube videos all the time in class. I am really interested in flipping my classroom, but can't seem to get a vision for what it would look like in kindergarten.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Teri,
      I agree that it is hard to "see" how things will look with the technology in K and 1st (I teach 1st) I like your idea of having the students make videos after you have taught something. What a great way to check for understanding of a concept that isn't just paper pencil. I agree it makes them "get into it!" I too have used youtube videos in my classroom!

      Delete
    2. Teri,
      I agree that it is hard to "see" how things will look with the technology in K and 1st (I teach 1st) I like your idea of having the students make videos after you have taught something. What a great way to check for understanding of a concept that isn't just paper pencil. I agree it makes them "get into it!" I too have used youtube videos in my classroom!

      Delete
  37. When I taught US History I had students create videos about a specific battle during the Civil War. It was a blast! I don't have students currently making videos, but I do like to pull up clips that pertain to our lessons (Jimmy Fallon when he does his science experiments on his show, for example) that we can't recreate in our classrooms.

    I loved how Matt reiterated not trying too many things at once. What a relief! There are times when I feel overwhelmed at all the new things I can/should/want to try. It is nice to hear that it is ok to not try to redo everything at once.

    ReplyDelete
  38. I have tried to increase my implementation of videos through YouTube, History.com, etc to flip lessons. Usually, I use short clips to add differentiation and other voices to the classroom. I have also increased my use of creative activities, which allow students to make videos of all sorts.

    ReplyDelete
  39. I have used many youtube videos in my classroom. I've also used some videos from Yay Math. Several years ago, I filmed several lessons and had an account through you tube with a code for my students to view. This was prior to the popular idea of flip the classroom and I used it with the students who needed to work at a faster pace than the majority of the classroom and also for students who needed to review or make up work from absences.

    ReplyDelete
  40. I personally have not made movies to be used in the classroom. I have been trained on iMovie. I use YouTube videos for Spanish music, Spanish commercials, and other fun videos. I use Señor Jordan videos for reinforcement of grammatical structures. Our on-line textbook also provides a variety of videos for our students.
    When our students make videos, they generally use iMovie or Quicktime. They are generally familiar with both.

    ReplyDelete
  41. I have not yet made videos myself for the classroom. I see the benefit of doing so when I spend an hour searching through YouTube or Learn360 for the "perfect" video that does not exist. However, I hate listening to the tone of my voice. I am thinking back to the days where I was required to watch a video of a lesson I presented in college. I was hypercritical of the words I chose and the inflection of my voice.

    Perhaps the best solution would be for students to record information for my class. They would be able to put the lesson in their own words and it would be more entertaining than listening to me. My students seem to respond to videos more than listening to a presentation. I look forward to trying this in the future. Canvas might be a good platform to see some of these videos.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I like the idea of kids being involved. I think they will take more ownership of their learning. This gives me an idea of videoing our routine in small groups for a sub. If I have a quick video, it would help her understand how the activity goes,

      Delete
    2. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
    3. I totally concur! Getting the students to make and share videos is an awesome idea. Then they really have a vested interest in doing well.

      Great idea to video a routine in your class for the guest teacher! Sure beats writing it all out and the visual aspect of it is always better anyway.

      Delete
  42. So far this year I've used Powtoons and Screencastify to share ideas. Currently, I am collaborating with a German IV class. Students are using TikiToki Timelines, Powtoon, GoAnimate, Voki, Blabberize, and Screencastify. I especially love a good screencast tool because it is so versatile. I have been trying to brainstorm how to integrate student created video into a Science class; I watched Matt's example of using Slides to animate and I can't wait to try it. I also want to create some interactive videos soon.

    ReplyDelete
  43. The idea of using videos is a great idea. In the kinder class I collab with, the letters and sounds are used in a kinesthetic way of learning. I need to explore using them more during my small group time. We have looked up pictures, websites that go along with a nonfiction book we have read with my third graders. I definitely can see how visual pictures with words enhances the memory of the words. I use letter cards with pictures but I am going to begin using pictures with sight words. Kids can create some too to help them remember them quicker. These chapters are challenging me to delve deeper into using videos with my kids. Thank you for the helpful sites.

    ReplyDelete
  44. I love using videos in my classroom. Typically I use United Streaming, TeacherTube, or Media Cast. I also use YouTube but am much more cautious there depending on the comments or the ads.

    I think creating your own videos is a great idea. The best selling point for me is the complete customization of the content. However, does anyone else feel nervous about doing it?? I can be silly and goofy in front of my students all day to keep them engaged. But to have hard evidence of my dorkiness is scary!! I don't think I want that in the internet forever!

    ReplyDelete
  45. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  46. I have not created videos to use in class, but after reading these chapters, I would like to try it. He makes it sound relatively easy to do. I can see many possible applications for self-created videos in my classroom.

    I do use lots of videos for reinforcing the math concepts I am teaching. I send my students math video links via Classroom that they can view while they are working independently. I occasionally use video clips to reinforce social studies teachings, also.

    Having students create and share videos over topics they are learning struck a chord with me. I think back to when students have created book report videos, skits, etc. and how powerful those can be when they are shared with the class. What a fantastic way to give students choice and ownership in their learning

    ReplyDelete
  47. I have used videos in my class a lot. Most of them I find on YouTube yo help emphasis a concept or or motivation purposes, Kid President and Ted Talks. When explaining a concept like mudslides it makes it so much more meaningful to watch a video on a mudslide happening or the after effects. I had never given much thought to students making their own their own videos but definitely something I would like to try.

    ReplyDelete
  48. This year I have been trying to incorporate student videos into lessons. Students seem to respond to it well - they are good at recording with their phones : - ) We also recently purchased a green screen and look forward to utilizing that in the future. I also use videos from sources such as YouTube and Ted Talks too. I also recommend students use Crash Course videos at home to reinforce Econ concepts. I think it all goes along with differentiating learning opportunities.

    ReplyDelete
  49. I use YouTube videos almost daily to demonstrate various musical skills, provide musical examples, and inspire my students to aspire to more. In fact, almost all of the cds that I used to keep in my classroom for musical examples have been replaced with YouTube. I don't always turn on the video if the focus is truly to listen to the music. But it is an invaluable tool to help my students learn to be better musicians. I also use videos of our concerts to help the students evaluate their own performances and to improve their skills

    ReplyDelete
  50. I have not created videos for my class, but did use Screencastify for a PD project. I don't like seeing or hearing myself, so I am not excited about making videos. I do like the idea of having students create videos. I have used YouTube videos this year. I like being able to find short videos that pertain to topic discussion.

    ReplyDelete
  51. I haven't made videos with the kiddos in my classes yet. However, I thought I would like to try to video some scripted reader's theater activities this year. That way, they could practice fluency, and have something to show the rest of the class that will relate to the subject they are learning about - it would make my struggling readers the stars of the show! Book reviews and summaries would also be great to create and suggest good books to other readers (kind of like the Reading Rainbow show from a LONG time ago when I was young!)

    ReplyDelete
  52. I haven't made videos with the kiddos in my classes yet. However, I thought I would like to try to video some scripted reader's theater activities this year. That way, they could practice fluency, and have something to show the rest of the class that will relate to the subject they are learning about - it would make my struggling readers the stars of the show! Book reviews and summaries would also be great to create and suggest good books to other readers (kind of like the Reading Rainbow show from a LONG time ago when I was young!)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I really like the idea of having the students read scripted materials. I think they can learn a lot from watching themselves.

      Delete
  53. I have used video in multiple ways for my math classroom. The main way I used it was when I flipped my PreCalculus class, plus some Algebra 1 and Algebra 2 lessons. I would create the lessons using my Promethean Activslate and Camtasia. Once I finalized the video I would upload it to YouTube. I would use Blendspace to collect all of the lesson's videos and other resources I thought were pertinent to the lesson. Once I had that curated, I would share that link with my students.
    I also had my students create videos for different reasons each of the past few years. I would have students use my iPad to explain their thinking while solving a specific equation. Their ability to audibly explain their process along with their writing really showed myself and their classmates their thinking.
    My favorite video lesson is when my students get to do a video project and choose their mathematical topic. I give the students quite a bit of freedom for this project. However, they must do the following: 1. Their math topic must be approved by me. 2. Each group member must be in the video. 3. The video must be at least 1 minute long, uploaded to YouTube, and shared with me. Kids LOVE this project because they have a lot of freedom and they get to be creative. I love it because I get to assess students in a different way as well as see their creative side. It is a fun project that I like to do at least once a semester.

    ReplyDelete
  54. I don't create videos to use I my teaching, but I do use videos like Crash Course, Horrible Histories, and other various videos to help aid in instruction review, or just to mix up a lesson. My students do create a number of skits for in class activities, so for an upcoming project, they will be creating their own videos. A colleague suggested screencastomatic to aid in this, but I'll be sure to look through the comments to see what else everyone is using! I think having students use their creativity to create videos will be a great step towards using more technology without going full technology all at once. I really do appreciate how Matt continues to suggest to make a few changes at a time, and not all at once. I think that makes the task of integrating technology less daunting and more manageable.

    ReplyDelete
  55. It is amazing how many teachers have access to YouTube now. I remember the days when YouTube was blocked for teachers and students. There is so much content out there! I show Book Trailers to my students weekly and have used Animoto for a few years to create projects. It is a hassle to get the educator's rights, but I like the polished final product on Animoto.
    Recently, I have tried Screencasting. Screencast-o-matic, Screencastify, and Snagit are all very easy to use! Snagit and Screencastify are Google Extensions and since my school is a GAFE school, they are free on our Google Chromebooks! I like how the video becomes part of content on Google Drive and then I can share it with others or share it out to YouTube.

    ReplyDelete
  56. I would love to create videos for my high school library! I have never done it before. I think the idea of video book reports is great. I wish I had thought of that last year with my 4th graders, we could have borrowed an ipad, they would have loved it. The only video I made with them was to record their famous Hoosier presentations. The rest of the time, I used youtube and khan academy a lot for videos both fun and informative. Before last year, I would find and use a lot of videos online that dealt with the library and the dewey decimal system for elementary students. We watched the Dewey Rap on youtube, other videos about how to behave in the library, how to take care of books. It really helped that these videos were created by other media specialists and showed students in the videos. That really helped my students to relate. We would also watch TumbleBooks, animated stories based on books. The kids loved them.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You should look at using book trailers. Several of our elementary library assistants use these for their upper elementary grades. The book publishing companies put these out, and they are designed to intrigue the kids and make them want to read the books. If I were in a fixed schedule setting, I would incorporate these routinely as kind of a similar to bell ringer task. Play the video as the come in and get settled down. I assume it would get them settled in quicker because they would not want to miss what was playing (I could be wrong, I work in a HS).

      Delete
  57. My school has just supplied each grade level with an I-Pad, and I am excited about being able to be able to record in my classroom to complement some of the lessons I've got in mind. I think that knowing they are being recorded will really motivate my students to do well in their presentations. For example, we have a first grade garden project on our grounds and up til this point students have kept a paper journal; I don't think I'll give that up, but I would like to have them give talks about the changes they are seeing as they stand in the garden to show and talk about it. We are also working on a Reader's Theater piece and instead of just telling them what I mean regarding their use of expression and how to utilize their props, we can record it and I can show them what I mean. And I admit that I love it when I have an idea for a lesson, particularly in Social Studies, and can bring video supplements from You Tube to make it more interesting for the students!

    ReplyDelete
  58. Sorry for the late post, but I was enjoying all Disney World had to offer last week during Fall Break. I have my students create videos, and I show videos to them. However, I have a huge fear of recording myself, and I HATE seeing myself on video. I'm sure that's something I need to get over, but not until someone forces me!!
    My students use animoto to create book trailers, and then they watch these and vote for the best. I have them turn them into me, and then I save them as an anonymous name so they don't know who did what.
    I also have them watch videos. Sometimes this is really hard with the Library Media subject area. I actually use more stuff that I have just watched on television myself, which I think makes them much more interesting. The History Channel does a pretty good job of presenting dry information in a more exciting setting.
    I have trouble accepting the concept of the flipped classroom. Deep down, I have this fear that it will be used against us. Yes, at face value it looks great! Record the lecture, students will watch on their own (yeah right), then work through the problems with them. Who really thinks this won't become a great way to justify less teachers? Until someone requires me to do it, that is one bandwagon that I won't be jumping on.

    ReplyDelete
  59. I love using Crash Course in my classroom. I most frequently use it with my AP course to either sum up a section or introduce it depending on the topic. The biggest challenge with crash course is that John Greene tends to talk too fast to understand! Sometimes I provide my students with a script for my students to follow along.

    Reading this book has gotten me inspired to dip my feet into the video making process. I plan on having the students use I-Movie to create a video over the Mongolian Empire. I am very excited, but somewhat worried being that its the first time I am doing this in my classroom!

    ReplyDelete
  60. I have not had my students create any videos, but we do watch a lot of Youtube videos. I like to enter the URL into the website viewpure.com (Matt Miller taught me this) at a conference through our corporation, and then you do not have to worry about any commercials during the videos. I would love to start doing videos in my P.E. class, and have students make how to videos (proper shooting form in b-ball, defense zone vs. man, batting stance- baseball). Not sure how to start this process though. What would be the easiest way for students to do this besides borrowing the video camera from our tech department? I am not that tech savvy, but I would love to do this with my classes.
    I also love the idea to include instructions for long projects/research on video for students so you do not always have to constantly be repeating yourself. What does everyone use to do this? Trying to compile some ideas for making videos and making this an easy process for students and myself.

    ReplyDelete
  61. I have utilized other people's videos but I have not made my own videos. I really like this idea because I think it helps the students that need a visual. Also, if a student is absent or if there is a snow day, students can access the video from home and complete assignments. Being in Indiana, I think the ability to have an e day instead of making up a snow day is important. Videos would assist teachers in making the e days more engaging and ensuring students understand the work. I have had students make videos and used them successfully in the classroom. My students have made public service announcements and book trailers. My students are always excited about using technology in this way.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I like the idea of using videos for students to make public service announcements. Our school corporation has worked hard to incorporate lessons about preventing bullying in our schools. We show many YouTube videos that help to get this message across, but I hadn't thought about having my students create videos to share. I also like the idea about creating book trailers. Thanks for sharing!

      Delete
  62. I make a lot of videos and post them on my blog - www.edgaged.net. I like to record with Snag It on my Chromebook only because it saves it in avi format and I can easily edit it because avi format is fairly universal. I also like to use Nimbus and Screencastify, but those save in webm format so I have to convert them if I want to edit them on my PC. I could edit them using the YouTube editor, but I'm kind of stuck on using Camtasia. I went to a flipping the classroom conference a few years ago and it was well worth it for the software alone.

    ReplyDelete
  63. I have not made my own videos, but have used many that I have found on YouTube and the History Channel app. My students typically really like it when I can add a video to the day's lesson--sometimes it helps them make a connection that I cannot seem to make for them. In college, I had a professor that made PowerPoints and recorded his lecture with each slide. He posted these on Blackboard when he needed to cancel class and we watched the PowerPoint on our own and discussed it when we met again as a class. Although this is not necessarily a video, I can see how this may be a good way to "teach" a class on a day when you need to have a sub or when there is a snow day and students have an E-Learning day at home.
    I just finished a project with my students in which they made weather forecasts for different locations and climate zones around the world. I filmed their presentations with my iPad and they cannot wait to see themselves on video.

    ReplyDelete
  64. I think videos can be a great tool for the classroom. As a history teacher I use videos to augment my lessons all the time. I typically use you tube. I also have the kids create videos for skits and other projects we do in class. The kids love to see themselves and their finished products on these videos. With their expertise in technology, they put music and sound effects and "spice" it up so that it almost looks professionally done. I am always amazed at how much talent these middle-schoolers have with technology.
    As we enter 1:1 next year, I am looking forward to researching news ways to incorporate videos into my curriculum and lesson plans. Miller has some great ideas and I agree with him 100% in letting the lkids help you learn as well. They know so much more about technology than I do.

    ReplyDelete
  65. In Chapter 30, Miller talks about the need for us to sometimes create the material that we need to reach our students. Sometimes what we desire is not out there, or it's not accessible through the school filters, or it costs a bit too much on teacherspayteachers. Last year, as we prepared our snow day lessons, the other first grade teachers and I came up with some great activities for Karma Wilson's fictional book Bear Snores On. We were almost certain that there was a read aloud out there to link to, so we just kept building our extension activities. Well, no luck on the video. After searching and searching, I decided to give iMovie a try. It took a bit to learn, but I enjoyed trying it out and the sense of accomplishment in knowing that I did it...without any formal training. No inservice needed. I didn't have to attend a meeting, a workshop, or write sub plans. I just took some time to try it out and play with it.

    At the beginning of Chapter 33, Miller talks about how our "students live in a digital world, but we force them to learn through analog means." I used to think that using videos in my classroom would be frowned upon, that I was wasting precious learning time. Sure, showing a 30 minute cartoon episode might not be the best idea, but there are some great videos out there that can help bring the information to my students. They live in a digital world, we have to meet them there. They leave school and go straight to iPads, X-boxes, and television. How can we compete with these types of visual stimulation? We can't. If you can't beat them, join them, right?

    ReplyDelete
  66. While I don't create videos for classroom use, my students do. They are currently working on a 30 sec advertisement for a PBL assignment. The students obviously enjoy it, but I'm still working with them to understand that filming themselves is not always the best way to get the message across. They are certainly a generation that loves seeing themselves on film, but an image or text is sometimes even more effective.

    ReplyDelete
  67. I have done some imovies in my classroom. I thing it's time to turn it over to the students. They will love planning and producing their own videos. What a great way to culminate and activity or lesson!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am always amazed at the level of creativity our students exhibit. Lots of "wow" moments when students show their own videos!

      Delete
  68. I am learning a lot from these chapters.i have spoken to the tech people about skypeing with the students from the countries that I have exchange students. I am excited about doing this. They told me that we do not have skype but can use a Google program to record and do the same thing.
    One problem is little technology at my school. They did not have a find for technology in our district but now do so hopefully more technology and training will be more readily available and I know I am good at learning it and keeping up once the equipment is available. It is all exciting just not there yet.

    ReplyDelete
  69. I think video can play a huge role in an effective classroom. Both videos for students to watch and videos created by students. I have always felt that choice is a powerful motivator and I always tried to include a video presentation option at the end of each project. Something as simple as a iPad video with no editing can be an effective presentation tool for students. As far as teacher created videos, I recommend Screencast-o-matic as a basic tutorial video creator. I also really like present.me which allows the presentation and the person to be on the screen at the same time.

    ReplyDelete
  70. There are plenty of videos available via YouTube and the Khan Academy. I just need to find time to take that first step and try out some videos in my classroom. We are moving to Canvas by next fall so I think that this will be more of a possibility by next fall. It is a matter of figuring out what topics to try out via video and whether or not I wish to make any videos on my own. Sounds like a summer project. I like the idea of an earlier post that I could use these videos for an e-learning day. I think that I could present the material this way and post assignments online for students. My issue is that not all of my students have internet at home. What do you do about this?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I used the Khan Academy recently for new SAT prep. There was a problem I missed and loved watching Sal working it out and explaining it. My students loved it too especially the ones serious about scoring well on the SAT. We have a teacher who films a lot and posts them on YouTube. He really spends major time on this. The more he has done it the easier it has been for him.

      Delete
    2. Thanks for the encouragement Kathleen!

      Delete
  71. I have used some of the Khan videos for our elearning days. There are some really good ones to use. I think it would be neat have the students video and make their own math lesson to share. This could easily be come a group project. Endless possibilities but I so need to narrow it down.

    ReplyDelete
  72. I use a LOT of videos in my classroom. We use them for movement activities, introducing vocabulary words, teaching math concepts, calendar, and even listening to stories read aloud by someone other than me (they LOVE that). Most of the videos I use are from youtube but I also use Storyline Online, and Brain POP JR.

    I have not made any videos yet but have ideas that I want to try. I'd love to make a video for each of our word wall words that shows the correct way to write it and reads the word to them, link that to a qr code and put the code on the back of word cards they use in their word work station. That way if they are in that station and come across a word that they don't know they are able to use their device to figure it out instead of practicing a word that they have no idea what it is.

    ReplyDelete
  73. I don't make my own videos, but I do often give students the option of using videos for their work. I leave it up to them, as to which program, software, platform, etc. they use. I always give the caveat that they are responsible for making sure that it can be shown in my classroom. If all else fails, I tell them to upload it to YouTube. But I also leave the option of performing the work live in class. Some students simply don't have the tech resources or know-how that others do, and I hate to penalize them. Also, sometimes groups have a difficult time getting everyone together to create the video. The live option takes the stress out of these situations, and most still choose to make the videos.

    ReplyDelete
  74. I don't make my own videos either. I find it to be a daunting task for many reasons -- editing, publishing, software, time, and basic knowledge of how to make it look like something I'd want to present are just some of those reasons. I liked some the suggestions that Matt made in the chapter, though. One that particularly stuck out to me was about using Vine for vocabulary. I'm always looking for more interesting ways to help kids connect with the plethora of vocabulary terms they are exposed to in Language Arts, and I think that would be a fun and creative option! I do turn to videos occasionally in my lessons, particularly with my alternative education students when I am trying to get them to understand some life skill. Talking to them about certain ideas, like compassion, integrity, honesty, can only get you so far. SHOWING them a video of someone else demonstrating those qualities has a much greater impact.

    ReplyDelete
  75. I used EduCanon in my Biology classroom. EduCanon allows you to take a video found on YouTube and insert questions (paid version allows for more types of questions). Students watch the video and answer questions along the way. They liked the quick checks for understanding this provided. There were some "go to" videos, created by some rock star science teachers that I also used (or recommended students use to review content), these included Bozeman Biology and Crash Course videos. I also created my own ECA review videos using iMovie (it was fun but super time consuming). I also liked to create "movie trailers" to introduce a new unit - Frank Gregorio produces amazing intro videos as well.

    Students create videos using iMovie, Animoto, and EduCreations. We recently purchased Padcasters for all buildings - a Padcaster basically turns an iPad into a production studio. Teachers and students are doing some great things with them! The Padcasters include green screen, TouchCast, and Filmic apps for quality video production.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have heard of EduCanon, but I have not used it, Sue. It would be great to use this for my Current Events class. I like the idea of being able to customize the questions my students answer with a video clip.

      Delete
  76. I have not made any videos in my class. I am planning on using screencastify soon. I use videos sometimes in class snippets of this and that. The students will soon be making videos in class for a book project. I also want the students to do a screencastify to demonstrate something they have researched. Khan Academy videos are used on occasion in here from time to time too.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I haven't heard of screencastify, Joel. Thanks for the tip; I'll check it out.

      Delete
  77. One of the English teachers and one student in my school have started making little 3-4 min. videos about athletic, academic, and extra-curricular activities that have taken place in our school the previous week. I love them, the kids love them, and the community loves them! They are shared on our school Facebook page and have been a great PR tool for our school. Confession, . . . . I don't know how to make one! I would like to learn because I can see many benefits for using them in the classroom. I have incorporated using a multitude of videos I find on youtube. It is great for a quick tutuorial in grammar, a short bio about a famous author, or CNN Student News in my Current Events class. I can attach free audiobooks of novels and short stories when they're in the public domain. I share these on my Edmodo page and students can watch and listen to them repeatedly instead of just once in class. I also helps getting content to absent students.

    ReplyDelete
  78. Creating videos is probably the most daunting use of technology for me personally as I feel I am not talented enough to create worthwhile videos and cannot help students create them on their own. However, because I am so iffy on my ability to create worthwhile videos I am determined to conquer them this semester for myself and then have students conquer them next semester. I believe in the notion that I cannot teach students something that I cannot do and therefore I need to become more proficient in the creation of videos before I expect my students to be.

    ReplyDelete
  79. I use lots of videos, but have never created my own...that's on my to-do list. I am in a Spanish teachers site on FB that has over 2,000 members and people are constantly making recommendations on video available online and I have saved many on my You Tube account.

    ReplyDelete
  80. I post everything I can link to the Google classroom so students can watch if they are absent or so they can watch again if they need to.

    ReplyDelete