Monday, July 20, 2015

What Connected Educators Do Differently Week 8: Key Connector 7 Model the Way

The authors talked a lot about modeling in this chapter. This quote jumped out at me: "Within a school culture that models and expects every member of the school community to look out for one another and values the voice of each member of that community, the mindset they operate under is: What we model is largely what we get." What do you think of this quote? How do you see this play out in your classroom or school? How are you modeling connectedness to your students and/or fellow teachers?

We only have one chapter left after this week. We will be reading "Key Connector 8 Know When to Unplug" next week. Be sure you are taking time to catch up on your reading and commenting. And if you haven't introduced yourself in the week 1 discussion, please be sure you do that.

98 comments:

  1. “What we model is largely what we get.” I believe this quote is very accurate in the teaching world and everywhere else. We as connected teachers have to be the model for our students and the connections around us. Students are going to follow what they see and apply it to their lives. We have to be the example, because sometimes, we may be the only good example that student has.

    I see this quote play out in my music classroom just about every day. I have to model what I need the students to do. If I don’t, they would not learn proper ways to play and instrument, clap a rhythm pattern, etc. Even though I do encourage them to sometimes play to get the feel for what we are doing. Also, being a Related Arts teacher, I have to make sure the students understand that it is a fun class to be in but we are also there to explore, learn and have fun.

    I feel that I model connectedness with my colleagues through social media right now since it is summer. I try to keep up with what’s going on with them and interact with them. During the school year I model connectedness through face-to-face and talking with them about their classroom, life and new ideas that they are trying. I feel I model connectedness with my students in the way that I like to get to know them, learning about things they like (technology, video games, books they’re reading, etc.) and talk with them about things they do outside of school (family, birthday parties, etc.). All of these things show that I do care about whom I work with and my students. And after reading this book, I am hoping to connect more this next school year and become a more connected educator.

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    1. I agree with you. Sometimes we are the only good example a student has. Showing a student how to interact with others and how to express their emotions are just a few ways we can demonstrate positive behavior to our students. Also, being a Related Arts teacher, it is very to model for the students. I find myself modeling for my students all the time!

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  2. I agree with the premise of modeling and expecting others to follow through with the same behaviors whether it is at school, at home, or in any place where priorities are placed on certain actions. It takes stamina and discipline to keep it up on all fronts, but the rewards (and occasionally the break downs) are apparent in the end products. Regarding connectedness, there is no shortage of social interfacing among junior high and high school students: the challenge is rerouting that same principle into classroom productivity. I have learned more from my own children and students how to increase my own connectivity; their engagement continues to show me the value in making it work for myself and in turn transforming that into educational efforts that are worthwhile. In other words, I have felt many times that I am not the one doing the modeling, rather I am seeing what turns middle/high school/college students on toward accomplishing a task then pairing that with the appropriate content that needs to be taught in my classroom. I still have some gains to make in the arena of stretching my connectivity in my community and beyond, but as I mentioned earlier I have some of the best 'teachers' in my classroom who can motivate me to do that.

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    1. I couldn't agree more!! My students have taught me so much and they love it when I come to them with questions and they help solve my problem...I call them my "tech support" and they really are!

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  3. Modeling is so important in any aspect of the classroom. From note taking, to practice work and to how we interact with one another. I always want to be the best role model for my students in all aspects. As we keep with the current trends modeling connectedness through social media will become more important.
    Students see connectedness in person when they see us collaborating with colleagues. I feel it’s important for students to see us interact with everyone with respect. Through some online connections, I found some new approaches to try in my classroom. I always let the students know the source. I feel this lets the students realize I am connected.
    It is also important to connect with our students. I make this a priority so the students know they each are important to me. Since my students have so much technology available, I also think modeling good face-to-face connectedness is essential.
    There are so many ways to be connected and it is important to be positive model in all we do every day.

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    1. I agree that modeling is an important aspect in the classroom. Many of my students come to school lacking proper etiquette skills for interacting with others. They are surprised when they see that the adults work together and discuss problems without anger and yelling -- When problems arise all eyes are on the adults and their good listening skills activated.

      I, like you, have always tried to be the best role model for my students.

      As for connectedness, our students have not had any opportunities to be connected. Our school system has blocked many internet sites and social medias for students. This next year will be the first year that students will have Google accounts set up and students will be able to use social media. Each classroom has four computers and we are expecting to have two Chrome laptops added to our rooms. So students will have more opportunities to improve their technology skills become connected.

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    2. I think that you made an excellent point on students observing teachers collaborating with other teachers. Teaching middle school aged students this can be especially important. This often is a time where social clicks occur and they can be very judgmental towards anyone outside of their inner circle. Modeling these interactions can be very rewarding for all involved. I have made the comment that I am not friends with everyone in the building but being a mature adult entails getting along with others for the common good.

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    3. The teacher I previously taught with and I would role-play or model the correct way to treat others in the classroom, lunch room or at recess. They loved to watch us do the behaviors incorrectly and then again correctly. They would even comment about the role-playing weeks later!

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    4. Christina Peek: The school that I work at has a lot of role playing/modeling within the classroom and staff meetings. Kids love to act out the scenes like being the teacher and the real teacher is doing the other part wrong. They love seeing everything and being allowed to participate in it as well! My school is the same as yours as you hear students talking about it well after it has happened!

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    5. At my school we have a little competition at the beginning of the year where students make videos modeling the correct/incorrect etiquette in the bathrooms, hallways, parking lot, etc. they love making the videos! Plus it gets the point across!

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  4. Modeling is especially important in preschool. Most of my students are in school for the first time and don't really know how to act in a group situation. I have to model for the students how I expect them to behave. I also have to model how to interact positively with students so they learn how to get along well with the other students. The best thing about this age is that they are eager to please and are always looking for positive reinforcement. During the beginning of the school year I have to model how to sit in a group, how to play cooperatively, and how to do the best work.

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    1. I am astonished at all the hard work that preschool teachers do! You set the ground work for how students will behave when they get to other grades. It must be very challenging but rewarding.

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    2. You are exactly right. Every year of teaching preschool I feel like the first two months that all I am doing is modeling. Throughout the year modeling continues through social skills lessons and reviewing expectations. Most of the students in my class have never been in any kind of structured environment and several do not have good models at home. So I feel like I have to reteach several behaviors and show what is expected of them at school. You are right about the positive reinforcement. Most of these students just want to be praised and appreciated.
      I've also had to model for student teachers. I want them to grasp how important it is to get down at the students' level and model interactions between students.

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  5. I was fortunate to meet two of the three ultimate models for this book at edCampLeader last week in Chicago. I met Jeffrey Zoul right off the bat, told him how much I enjoyed the book, and he called Jimmy Casas over to meet me as well. They both autographed my post-it flagged, highlighted, marked-up copy of the book. The edcamp was rampant with professionalism; opinions were solicited, respect given, and opinions valued.

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    1. How exciting...not only to meet 2 of the authors but to see the type of connected modeling talked about in this chapter at your edcamp! I bet it was an awesome experience!

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    2. That is amazing! I agree, being able to see the book in action must have been a great experience!

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  6. I have used Facebook, Remind, and Twitter for my students. I also follow students, sports teams, and fellow teachers and educators in our corporation. It is important that students see that teachers post things that relevant to school - sometimes, I post funny things about grammar and reading - and avoid drama. I post pictures that are appropriate to school, but I avoid the political stirrings that are bad-mannered or out right incorrect. I "like" posts that are relevant to teaching English or coaching the various activities I am involved with, and I hope to share those with my students and colleagues alike. Sometimes I will comment on a post of a student with the appropriate "you're" or "their/there" because I'm an English teacher, I can't turn it off, and it's important to me. I'm sure my students roll their eyes, but they know me too well to know I am going to let them get away with improper usage! :) I have shared many of the new ideas (or retweeted) so that my colleagues can see the various resources out there - I hope to be modeling for them appropriate use and ideas for professional development and change.

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    1. As teachers, we are leading the way and we do need to model the behavior we expect to see in our students. It is true that what we model is what we will get. I think this is true at school, in our families and all our relationships. It is true with social media, our dedication to the success of our students, our desire to constantly grow and to embrace change. I hope to see more social media being used at my school. It would be so great to see a twitter feed on the monitors. I have noticed that we are not blocking as many sites such as you tube so that it is available to the students. I agree that we should not cater to the 5% and expect students to do the wrong thing but instead focus on students who are doing the right thing! I continue to try to build my PLN and feel confident in sharing. I also love the idea of thinking beyond our own school to the whole district. Just knowing that the Superintendent is on twitter sharing the good news and announcements is very rewarding and I think helps with teacher, community and parent relationships and making it more open and accepting. I agree that our educational world will continue to change and we need to model this in a positive way and embrace it.

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    2. Cindy - I think what you have said about modeling the correct way to be connected is so true! Sometimes it is easy to forget that we need to model the good behavior with social media that we want to see. Well said!

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    3. Cindy- that is great! I do the same things when I am on social media. I always look for and post the positive and if it's not, I'm glad FB has the "do not show" option, that way all the drama and negativity can stay away! And yes, I agree, as teachers we must be able to constantly grow and embrace the changes that are happening. And I am with you, I am working on becoming more confident in posting my own ideas or sharing new ones that I find interesting.

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  7. Modeling for our students has been important long before technology and social media came along. Students continue to look to us for guidance in this digital age. I do think that my school has done a good job modeling trust. All our students received IPads three years ago and rather than block all the questionable sites we focused on teaching our students digital citizenship. The number of IPad related incidents has steadily decreased over the three years.
    I am afraid that I have not modeled connectedness much to my students and that I have been a follower rather than a leader in this department. I believe that I am the only one from my school participating in this book club, so now I do feel like I have some new information to share. In this chapter in particular, I was inspired by those who host their own weekly Twitter chats and would love to do that some day!

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    1. Digital citizenship has to be modeled too! Students have technology tools at their disposal from a very young age but may not have the appropriate knowledge/modeling of how to use these tools for educational purposes. We're all on a learning curve here becoming more 1:1 in schools. How we react to it will be a learning moment(s) for all in the school community. I am encouraged that your school has had less incidents and it has resulted in more positive outcomes in the last 3 years. Here's hoping to continued success!

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    2. I agree we have struggled with what to do with students to make the digital citizenship a priority. Students do not seem to understand the concept of what they post will be on the internet for all to see forever. We have a digital leadership student group that has been trying to prepare lessons for all students to begin to understand the issues of digital citizenship. I hope that we can get them incorporated into our classrooms K - 12 and prepare them for the world that we are living in.

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  8. Every student at our high school has a laptop, this can be a blessing and a curse. It is fantastic to have all this information for the students to have right at their fingertips and the technology to do so many exciting things, but it can quickly become a source of negativity. Finding positive ways for the students to use the technology in the classroom can switch the tone of the classroom. Students have such an extensive knowledge of computers and technology in general, that it would be a shame not to let them lead the way on some of these ways to be connected. Giving the students the chance to create something positive on social media and celebrating their success would be awesome.
    Another trait that our students have is that they are almost always confident and willing to share their voice. While most adults tend to be somewhat hesitant to believe that our voice matters, our students can inspire us to gain confidence and speak out; and while it is important to give feedback to our students, they can provide feedback to us as we begin to reach out more and connect with each other. It could be very empowering for them to be our models for a change!

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    1. I want to work on this more this year- letting my students share THEIR voice and be as connected as I am.

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    2. I love the idea of students teaching more of what they know in the classroom when it comes to technology. Maybe it is because of my age but the closest I came to technology in high school was the 8 track tape and typewriter. My own children are teaching me new things on the computer all the time. I should let my students do the same.

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  9. This quote made me think of a principal I had. She was very good at taking the time to model first- go slow to go fast. I was reminded of how she moved the whole school through stations that taught and modeled the expected behavior within the school. The staff and students were all on the same page.This principal also modeled the need for collaboration and professional development by keeping herself engaged and active. The building ran smoothly, the staff was cohesive, and the students knew who was in charge. Modeling takes planning and time but in my experience it is worth it.

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  10. I loved this chapter! I completely that "What we model is what we largely get." My own children at home are 12 and 15, and I'm starting to see this lived out in their lives as they grow into young adulthood- all of those life lessons and values that my husband and I have modeled all these years through their childhood are becoming a part of their lives (for good and sometimes bad). Ind the classroom, I believe in modeling lifelong learning with my students- I share what new things I am reading, learning, and doing. My class mantra is "F.A.I.L.= First Attempt, I'm (Still) Learning"; I constantly share my failures AND successes with my students so they know that it's a lifelong process of growth. I model connectedness by sharing my Twitter life (which is only professional) with them, as well as having a classroom Facebook page to post pictures and weekly class successes so they stay connected to class at home and with their parents. I use REMIND to send daily reminders to parents and students as well as a sort of "blog" of what we've done in class that day. I also share these ways that I am connected with my fellow staff, but the reality is that most do not choose to be as connected as I am (which is OK).

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    1. I love your FAIL acronym! It's so important for students to understand that excellence is a continuing process, not a single act. I, also, try to model that to my students by sharing successes and failures, especially of the technological variety. What is gratifying (and funny and poignant, too) is when they do the same thing to me! While my more technologically savvy colleagues are great at finding, using and sharing different ideas, some of the best ideas have come from students who have "mentored" me through ways to be more connected. I must agree that "what we model is largely what we get."

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    2. I love the FAIL also. I hope you don't mind if I barrow it?

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    3. I love your FAIL acronym! Thank you for sharing!

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    4. I love your acronym also. It really applies to me!

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  11. I would love to use more technology in my classroom but as a gym teacher there is very little choices that I have to do so. Would love a moveable White Board but the cost is prohibitive for our school. The other option for our building has to many electrical cords on the ground.

    Our district is going to New Tech this year for elementary. I don't know if this Is going to be 1:1 but I know that is their goal. Hopefully we can keep up with technology and keep the teachers up to speed also.

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  12. I feel that modeling is one of the biggest aspects of teaching. Students pay attention to how you react to them, other students, parents, and other co-workers. These interactions can help create a positive classroom environment or a negative one. As educators, we have a huge impact on how a student interacts with other students and teachers. Sometimes we are the only person in their lives showing them good behavior. Demonstrating these positive behaviors can really help a student that is struggling with expressing themselves in negative ways. As a music teacher, I feel that I am always demonstrating to my students. Everything from, how to handle/play instruments to singing techniques.
    As our students start to interact online with others, I believe this quote is essential. I think it is extremely important to demonstrate connectedness on social media. Social media is an interesting and exciting tool. You can connect with others with the same interests from around the world. This can become overwhelming for any adult and child.

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  13. I try to encourage my students to use technology in my classroom for assignments and extra interest topics. I do model connectedness by letting them know about teaching friends across the USA who share ideas on a regular basis. We have taken advantage of that once or twice to create student projects with their classes. I try to connect with individual stdent's interestes, but as talked about in a previous chapter, there are those invisible students... I try very hard to connect with as many as possible. I am connected with other science teachers and willingly mentor for leadership and teaching techniques. I try new approaches in teaching, and I make sure students know I value their feedback.

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  14. Sorry; the internet connection where I am is a little wonky and my other post went up before I actually answered the prompt. It's interesting that this question is posed while I'm at a workshop where we had a focused session on twitter this morning. I recommended this book to one of our leaders. For some students, a teacher's use of twitter to share reliable, timely resources might be the first time they experience twitter as an educational tool. We can also model the idea of a growth mindset if we experience technological setbacks and try to work our way through them. I help with the twitter account for my school, for IMLEA, and AISLE. When students told me they didn't use twitter and I should get instagram for the library, I added that (but haven't done that much with it yet)

    I really liked the section on page 99 that said connected educators are constantly sharing and bringing a positive environment. My experiences with social media have been overwhelmingly positive; the teachers making the effort and time to incorporate it are doing it with good intentions.

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  15. Having just come through my first year of being 1:1 iPads with my 2nd grade class (only one in my corp.), I can say that it was such a memorable journey! Modeling has always been part of my daily routines with all lessons so integrating technology into our daily routines was no different. But with the technology, there just seemed to be a "realness" to connect school life with home life. I felt I was able to be that leader for them to show them how to use the tools that they use primarily for gaming (as 2nd grade isn't on the social media front yet but as observers of older family members) for educational uses. I was able to have conversations with my class that we were going to be learning partners in this and we would have ups and downs but it was going to be a fun year! Students would get excited about an app we were using because after I had modeled and they had time to work with it, they would find out how to do more new things and wanted to share with the class to help everyone else...oh how all of us celebrated and were excited! It became this contagious positive sharing among the students, and then they would share with other students in other classes, then those students would ask their teachers, and then they would ask me. Something that started with one class became a building level buzz, which led me to seek out PD to learn more, and by the end of the year I presented at the district level on integrating tech in the elementary classroom. This coming year I might be going to other schools in our corp. to do specific PD tailored to their needs based on what they saw me do. It is my hope through these connections I might be able to be a leader in what I've modeled with my class and share my learning through my tech PD so that other teachers will feel comfortable trying something too!

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  16. The quote “What we model is largely what we get”--Reminds of the saying, “Lead by example.”
    Setting the example is the teacher’s most important role. Children watch and listen. If you demonstrate the expected behavior, then most of them are more likely to develop the desired behavior.

    I work in a building with Smartboards in every room. So the children have been surrounded my technology as long has they have been at our school. Students are accustomed to seeing email notifications pop-up at the bottom of the screen. Emails are sent to notify the office if a visitor is on the way down. This is a form of connectedness.

    In my classroom, students expect to see the Smartboard used for each subject. Since our district has restricted social media during school hours, Facebook was unavailable. I didn’t have a Twitter account before this book club, so I am not certain if it was available. I don’t have a Smartphone, so I don’t run around with a phone glued to my hip.

    In 2015-2016, our students will have more access to social media – let the modeling began.
    I have started a Google Classroom account and a YouTube account as well. Let the planning begin. Time restrictions will be challenge – we are told how much time each subject is allowed and when these subjects will be taught so fitting in the new technology social media activities will be difficult. But when there is a will, there is a way.

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    1. Hi, Nancy!
      I used the Google Classroom 2nd semester with my 4th graders. It's a great resource as it's so easy for students to make corrections and resubmit their work. PLUS, I don't have to keep track of their resubmitted papers all over my desk. Hope you love it, too!
      D :)

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    2. I use GoogleClassroom and its really looking good! Also youtube will be great! To be able to create play lists and keep them all safe is great!

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  17. As most have said modeling is very important for your students. I use the iPad to model for the students constantly during class from showing videos to creating presentations what I expect them to do I model for them during the lessons.
    If students do not see the teachers using the technology the students will not use it themselves.
    I use youtube and keynote for my class along with some self created videos even. The hope is with the Canvas system we are starting this school year it will allow for technology and those skills to be taught easier.

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  18. I completely agree with the quote "what we model is largely what you get." I wanted my teachers to begin to take more risks. When I started to take risks in what I was doing, the teachers began to take risks as well. I have told my teachers I would love to see them start to blog about what they were doing,. I have just started my blog in the last few months and now I have teachers that have said they need to start their blogs.
    It is easy for administrators to stand in front of the teachers and say "I want you to do........" but if we are not doing it ourselves the teachers are a little more reluctant to do it themselves. Same thing goes with the students. We tell them we want them to learn from their mistakes, to take notes a certain way, to behave a certain way, etc, etc. If we tell them to do it a certain way and we do it differently, we are not modeling what we expect. That modeling is so important in all we do. Same thing goes for a positive digital presence. I drives me buggy when teachers preach about being positive on social media and then they are not.

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  19. I think that it is extremely important to model our expectations in and out of the classroom. As adults, you cannot expect children and teenagers to know what and what not to do. They often lack the foresight for natural consequences. If multiple people hold the conversation of importance of their digital footprint and show examples of how it can affect you later in life that could change the future for using digital media in the classroom.

    I really liked the part of this chapter that mentioned we must involve technology for the benefit of all students and not be afraid of what the small percentage of students will do with it inappropriately. Technology IS here to stay and if we want the future generations to be successful in life, educators/administrators need to jump on board and be a good example for students.

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  20. As teachers we all know the importance of modeling for our students. We model the correct way to do an assignment, interact with other people, behavior in difficult situations, and in everyday situations. Many of our students do not have any models at home that will help them become successful members of society.
    I think my 8th grade teaching team models connectedness very well. They see all of their teachers sharing ideas. They see us call another teacher if we have a question about technology. They hear us talk about what the other teachers are doing in doing class, projects, assignments, ect.
    I model connectedness to my fellow staff members by sharing articles and ideas that I have read about and where I got the information. The comment I hear the most is "I don't have time to do that". I talk to them about how it really doesn't take that long to become "connected".

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    1. Yes, the modeling you shared is very important for students to see because it shows interaction not only with the, but with the other teachers you work with and that we are not afraid to ask others for help. Modeling with technology is also key because there is so much out there that is inappropriate and if we can model the basics hopefully we can keep them or at least detour them from those sites.

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  21. Modeling is huge in the classroom!! Even when you think your students understand, keep modeling. I just attended a workshop today that touched on the topic of modeling. Teachers need to model numerous things throughout each day whether it's how to do 2 digit subtraction, how to reword the question in an answer, or even how to line up quietly. As a staff we need to model respect amongst each other. We may not always agree with everything our colleagues say, but we need to show them the respect they deserve just as we would model for our students to do with each other.

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  22. Modeling is a great way to learn. It says I like what I see you doing and I want to try that too. I was reminded of that by watching an awesome children's minister this past week. I loved how she related to the kids and thought, I want to try some of her techniques. By seeing the example and the results she got, I was motivated to make a change and try something new.

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  23. Our school used the Gradual Release of Responsibility - GRR - with the framework of Fisher and Frey.
    1. First is "I do." This is where teacher models, demonstrates, states the learning objective, etc.
    2. "We do together." Teacher leads students through guided practice. It may need to recycle back to teaching modeling, etc. but practice is with teacher alongside guiding.
    3. "You do together." Students work together in productive, accountable group work. Each student is required to contribute and signs off on the work he/she contributed. Teacher is there, but not as involved as in guided practice unless needed. Recycling through the steps at any time as needed.
    4. "You do." This is when students are ready to be independent workers.

    This framework works. It also employs lots of 21st Century Skills in collaborative learning.
    https://diywithrti.files.wordpress.com/2013/04/grr.png This is the way the framework looks.

    http://fisherandfrey.com/ Under "Resources" you will find GRR. There is also LOTS of resources online under Fisher and Frey and GRR. Videos, etc.

    D :)

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    1. I like your GRR framework. I try to do this but I often skip number 3- having the children do it together. This makes sense and I will try to follow it! Thanks for the information!

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    2. This is great information! I am just starting out in my first grade-level classroom of my own. I will definitely have to try the GRR framework out!

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    3. Thanks for sharing the GRR framework! Good stuff!

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  24. I like the GRR approach mentioned by BennisBuzz above. Now that we are well into being a 1:1 school, I think I have accidentally forgotten that students may not have been taught how to use the computer as a tool. They know very well how to play games, use social media, and any other personal use of the computer. But do they really know how to use the computer to network and research? I participated in a course this year in which we spent half a day learning how to "research" and determine what sites were legit. I was introduced to the CRAAP test, list of questions to help evaluate the information found. http://www.juniata.edu/services/library/instruction/handouts/craap_worksheet.pdf
    This half day made me aware that I probably have taken the internet for granted, and that students don't really know if a particular site is accurate. This year I am all set to spend time to model this research method and would like to incorporate that in the GRR.
    I also think it is important to share with students that we as teachers also network with each other to improve each other. I try to share with my students where I get my ideas or activities, and from there we as a class set forth to make any editions to make it better or fit our needs.
    I also believe that students seeing teachers network with each other in the school building, especially in different disciplines, models that our subject or even teaching style is not "the only one," and that we all help each other be the best teachers we can be to make our school the best it can be.

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    1. Thanks for the CRAAP test info Rena! I think that this is something everyone can use. There are so many things out there on the web, anyone can create websites, post blogs, etc. its very hard to know what is good and what is bunk! Again thanks for sharing!

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  25. I also enjoyed this chapter! Like so many of you have already said, "we have to model what we want our students to do". I think the process of modeling starts in our personal lives, echoes into our classrooms and fills our students and the rest of the school. I have had students ask if they can use certain apps in my classroom that they use in other teachers rooms-I rarely ever say "NO" to that! I actually ask if I can check them out too! I had the opportunity to attend a edCamp last week and I connected with every guest speaker and a few other attendees via Twitter, Google, and Facebook. I hope to connect with my students in the upcoming school year as easily.

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  26. We are role models for our students everyday, all day long. The behaviors and attitudes that are projected everyday are so important in our students’ lives. Possibly, we are the only positive person in their life that models positive behavioral skills as well as content material.
    As a World Language teacher, modeling is so important for the acquired skills of learning a new language. We must model everything that is done repeatedly so it becomes routine.
    As others have stated, students also model for us…especially with technology. Students have shown me a lot since becoming a 1:1 school. I hope to use Twitter, Google Classroom and a few other classroom tools this year.
    I also found the Gradual Release of Responsibility mentioned by BennisBuzz. I plan to look into the resources that were provided on her post.

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  27. I too enjoyed reading about the GBR model mentioned above! It seems to encompass responsibility, teamwork and modeling well. Thanks for sharing! Many Americans seem to have the "I can do it...all by myself" mentality. I appreciate educators who are working to encourage children to be successful independent learners as well as successful collaborative workers.

    To comment on the questions for this week, modeling is a huge part of my preschool classroom. I have students ages 3-5 years old. My teaching assistant and myself serve as models on a daily basis...and we have to be extra aware of this the first part of the year when some students come in having no school experience. We are modeling every component and expectation of the day! We also encourage our older students to be peer models to their fellow classmates. They do a great job modeling to the younger students the ins and outs of preschool.

    Modeling can been witnessed in our school on multiple levels. One was is we tend to work with older grade levels at certain times. This process often involves modeling and has been very beneficial to my students.
    Another way modeling can be observed is new teachers are paired with younger teachers to help mentor and model to them the expectations of the building and district. Teachers work together within grade levels and beyond to model to each other and to the students positive behavior and school etiquette.

    One last note is our principal is also a great role model. He is always willing to do anything and everything within the building and constantly models expectations to students and staff. On page 97 the text states: "The work that is expected in our schools today from those who work there to serve students, parents, and the community requires more of a connected leadership approach that is transparent and based on a foundation of trust. Moreover, it requires an approach that is purposeful and values not only each member of the organization itself—from every student to every teacher—but also every stakeholder outside the organization, including parents, community members, and other connected educators." I see evidence of this in our school district and community and believe we are stronger for it!

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  28. Since I am a 2nd grade teacher I model most everything we do. If you walk in my room and we are doing a writing prompt I will be modeling by writing mine as the children are writing theirs. I have the children write about admirable citizens in history who have made a positive impact on our lives. Each child writes about a different person and I pick a person also. So as I am following my organizer they are following theirs and they are modeling me to know how to set up the report correctly.
    Besides modeling academics I also model how to walk in the hall, how to be courteous, how to behave at Mass, ECT...
    I do worry that so much modeling takes away being creative, using the children's own problem solving skills, ECT...
    I am sure I need to model connected-ness more. I do daily encourage work on our classroom computers. My class does IXL Math daily. I love this program and feel it is very worthwhile.
    I do use my white board to show educational videos but I need to use it much more than I do.
    This year our school has accepted a challenge to use technology to access at least one new area of work. I plan to use technology to access Economics in Social Studies from a class I took this summer.

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    1. Do you guys have iPads? I use our Apple TV to Airplay their work onto the Smartboard. It's been quite fun.

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  29. We went 1:1 last year with iPads. I believe most students really enjoy having them and using them, but I was really surprised by the seemingly large number of students who really don't like using them. There are often complaints about how using old technology is easier, and several students don't regularly bring their iPads to class.

    I bring this up because if we as teachers want to implement technology in our classrooms, it is important to promote use of technology and praise it. Using apps and programs, promoting the use of our iPads instead of running to the computer lab, and attending professional development training to learn about new apps and programs will aid in modeling the importance of using technology to our students.

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  30. I agree that modeling is very important in our classrooms and school atmosphere. One example is digital citizenship. We have one day a week where we learn about and discuss this in our classrooms. As teachers and school staff we need to make sure that we are also practicing digital citizenship in our lessons. We need to show them that we give credit to what we find online, be it a PowerPoint presentation, worksheet, or activity.
    We also need to make sure we are modeling to our students how we expect them to act, both inside and outside of the classroom. If we are mocking our peers, even in a joking manner, we cannot turn around in the next breath and be on our students for doing the same to their peers. We must act how we expect them to act. I have had students mention other things they have "gotten away with" in other classrooms, be it with technology or behavior, and they immediately tell me that they know they could not do that in my classroom because that is not how I act or expect them to be.

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  31. I think we would all be hard-pressed to find someone who would actually say that it is not important to model appropriate behavior -- in the classroom, in regular life, as teachers, as parents, etc. Unfortunately, many of us forget to practice what we preach. Social media can be a dangerous outlet when we are frustrated or upset because it is so much easier to misbehave when we are behind a screen. I have shied away from social media for a number of years because I do not want to risk a situation where I over-share, say the wrong thing, or say something that gets taken wrong. However, this book and other current situations in my life are showing me that social media has many benefits and I am allowing myself to be disconnected by avoiding it. I am looking forward to attending a technology conference here in Lafayette this week and embracing new ways to "connect" my teaching and my classroom. If I model it appropriately and embrace it, there can only be lasting benefits for my students.

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  32. As a counselor modeling appropraite behavior for my students is very important be it in my office, hallway or the cafeteria. I also feel that modeling appropriate behavior is not enough. I try to provide my students opportunities in which to use the appropriate behaviors I am modeling. It is importatnt that students have multiple opportunities on multiple stages in which to practice these skills, from technology to showing compassion to others, to establish them as a habit.

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    1. As a teacher I have always tried to model appropriate behavior. I have felt not just the eyes of my students were watching but also the eyes of parents, colleagues and community. I guess I have the mindset that teachers make a difference and effect the lives of those that I teach, hopefully all to the good! Now our role has another component of modeling digital leadership. It amazes me as much as students see what happens in the news concerning this issue or even what has happened to them or friends some are not detoured from bad decisions. It is just not students, it is also adults from all walks of life that are making these same bad decisions. Hopefully we will be able to successfully educate our students on this issue.

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  33. As a teacher it is so important that I model for my students. Just like modeling in math or reading, I also need to teach them digital citizenship. It makes so much sense after reading this chapter, but I realize I have a lot of improvement to make when modeling the use of technology to my students. I am going to be taking a technology course throughout the year, and I hope part of this class will be about teaching my students about digital citizenship.

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  34. Modeling is so important for our students. I think it is even more important in my field of special education. Sometimes while in inclusion classes the other students may understand the directions given, while the special education students may need to have it modeled for them first before they can complete the task. I also think it is important to model everything that we are expecting our students to do throughout the day: how to treat others, being responsible by picking up litter, etc. I really enjoyed the discussion in the book about treating the students like they are all "good" especially with the technology that we have given them. I also was intrigued by the young student who started the Twitter chat for students to express their voice on educational issues. I think that this is very powerful and inspiring, I will definitely be sharing this info with students at school!

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  35. I think many times adults in general forget that anytime we are around children we are modeling for them. They are watching to see how we treat others, how we react when we are upset or when something doesn't go our way. I think when we set high expectations for ourselves then we can also have high expectations for those around us. As a classroom teacher we set the bar. We determine what is acceptable and what is not. When I think about technology in the classroom and the implications of modeling I think of using technology in a responsible way. Students need to realize the importance of digital citizenship for everyone.

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    1. Agreed! Every moment we are being watched! That's hard to remember sometimes! Especially if we lose our cool for a second. I always think about modeling in terms of organizational skills as well. I always emphasize to my kids to be organized, etc and I have to remember that if I'm asking them to be organized, I must be as well! We have to model so many life skills that seem so natural to us now, but may be new or foreign to our kids at the moment!

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    2. Yes, we are constantly watched. What we do is certainly critiqued by the students, and they notice more than we realize sometimes! Our athletic director reminds us, the athletes know when we attend their contests. The same principle can be applied to students.

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  36. I truly loved this chapter. It reminded me to be professional and enter my classroom with joy and expect great things. I don't feel like my PLN is where it should be and am having a hard time getting Twitter to be my giant platform. I have found some great resources on there and am hoping that my students will get to connect well with others.

    I also agreed that we need to expect greatness and trust with the students being in the digital world. I love teaching digital citizenship to my second graders. I hope that because of this, they have greater respect for using the Internet and the tools they are given.

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  37. Modeling is very important in all aspects in, as well as outside, of the classroom. I model constantly in my classroom. I think that as teachers we are all good at modeling skills inside the classroom as parts of lessons, but we also have kids watching us outside the classroom too. Whether it is at recess duty, walking down the hall, or even at the grocery store after school. More and more it seems that students don't have good role models at home and need to see manners and good behaviors modeled by the their teachers. Digital modeling was something I had not really thought much about before. We do have Smart Boards in our classrooms and a few computers, but I hadn't really thought about how much the students pick up from what I am doing on them. I can see where explaining things to them that I am doing would be good modeling for them. I had lots of computer issues last year and the students could see the frustration and looking back on it I might have been modeling and not really realized it. I would tell them that sometimes things don't work correctly when dealing with computers, or I would thank the people that came in to help (even if it was in the middle of class) and didn't solve anything. I think we just have to keep in mind that the students are always watching and learning for us. Connectedness with fellow teachers is something that I try to do. I am always willing to help in any way with ideas I have found and always try to keep our principal and fellow teachers updated on new technology with our textbooks or other interesting topics.

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  38. I loved the part where it discussed how teachers need to feel valued and empowered to make curricular decisions for their classroom/ school. When I feel this, I am willing lo leap tall buildings in a single bound for my students, my school, and the district.

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  39. I love this quote! As part of our Digital Learning Day activities, I had a few teachers help me administer a student technology survey. It gave me so much good information about our students perspective on technology use and integration in our schools, but the piece of data that jumped out at me was 20% of all students who participated in the survey said that NO ONE has ever talked to them about their digital footprint! We need to model good digital citizenship and a positive digital footprint/tattoo for our students! Being a connected educator can help model this and show our students how easy it can be to reach experts, authors, leaders, and others who share our experiences. I am passionate about showing my students (and all students) that Twitter is more than fights and gossip and Instagram can be more than a bunch of selfies!

    As for modeling for teachers, I'm probably the most connected person in my building. I always share new ideas I gain from my PLN, invite my colleagues to Twitter chats, and model for them the power of being connected. I think it really hit home for them when they saw other educators jumping into our Teach Like a PIRATE Twitter chat and when Dave Burgess agreed to a Google Hangout with us to wrap our book study. Yes, I organized those activities, but I'm a teacher in the building just like them; I was able to make those things possible because I was connected and not afraid to reach out on Twitter to other educators, even the famous ones.

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  40. I have to remind myself quite often that I need to model some of what I think are basic skills or knowledge, even at the middle school level since at times the students seem to be more grown up than elementary. How to clean a paint brush, how to share a water bowl, how to wipe off a counter, how to arrange a workspace, etc. I also show them what happens when some of these ideas aren't used. Also, I try to use the "magic words" when interacting with students, even when I've said thank you a hundred times already, my students seem to respond better when I say it again. And I notice they start to use these polite terms very soon in the 9 weeks.
    Students have connected with most teachers through the use of Google Classroom, and I've set up a Facebook page and will use my #yellowjacketart on Twitter this year. I'm still planning to explore Instagram as well. As teachers, we've been on teams and have connected and shared within the team. We have occasional opportunities to connect across teams. There have been collaborations available to learn new technology and we are implementing more digital citizenship this year with our 1:1 24/7 chromebook policy.

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  41. Modeling is key here! Many of the students today lack a good role model or someone they can look up to, some seek that model at school. This is why it is important as teachers and administrators that we illustrate this in the classroom, in technology and in using social media especially.

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    1. Good point Lara! I couldn't agree more with what you said. For some of our students, we are the only positive role model that they might have.

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  42. I think this quote is very true for every successful school and most businesses. Everybody within a school works together. Yes, there have to be administrators, faculty, and staff, but there have to be people with different roles and the authority to make the rules to keep things running smoothly. However, if we treat the school as if everyone is working together as equals it gives everyone more of a voice and the opportunity to speak up and contribute to the well-being of the educational setting. It also allows those people who tend to not want to speak up to feel more comfortable with contributing. These people typically don't speak up because they feel as if they have nothing valuable to contribute. However, in a setting where everyone is seen as equal and opinions are valued, it's easier for everyone to become comfortable. The school I worked out for the last two years made a very good effort at keeping people equal. It wasn't perfect, and I would doubt that any place ever could be, but people were comfortable sharing at faculty meetings and being honest with out administrators. When a school operates like this, it makes a much better learning environment for the students because the educators are on board with the same ideas. It is also a way to model to the students how to work together with other people.

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  43. I have always believed modeling procedures, behavior, quality work, thought processes, and the list goes on is critical to teaching our students to be active learners. But until this book, and many excellent comments on the posts, I have not really thought much about modeling the correct behavior, language, and respect that needs to take place with being connected. The comments made in this post have really directed me in how I will handle the modeling of connectivity in my classroom. Too often we forget that our students are watching and learning by what we do!!!

    By modeling we can create a positive learning culture and everyone benefits....sadly, some of my students parents leave out the positive when it comes to social media and really lay on the negative so this is what our kids know and think acceptable. It is up to us then to lead by example along with discussing the appropriate ways to be connected.

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  44. Modeling is very important among both students and adults in school culture. My classroom contains high school students with moderate disabilities. They are so easily influenced by culture and wanting to 'fit in.' They are influenced by both peers and adults at school. I notice that it is essential for adults working with my students to model appropriate behavior. The same is true for teachers and school leaders. School leaders need to model the qualities and behaviors that they want to be shown across the school culture.

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  45. This has probably been one of the most highlighted chapters for me in the book. I related and appreciated many of the sections, statements, and quotes, starting on the first page with the quote from Emerson.

    I think the quote referenced in the prompt is very true, especially in the field of education. How can we have high expectations for our students if we don't adhere to them ourselves? How can we expect parents to communicate with us and have an open relationship if we don't model this in return? How can we expect collaboration and open communication with our colleagues if we don't do the same? One of my favorite quotes from this chapter was, "Connected learners model the way for others....They know they cannot ask students and colleagues to do what they are not willing to do themselves." How very true this is!!

    I have worked hard in my career to not only model my expectations in my classroom for my students but to also abide by them as a professional educator. If I expect my students to be on time, have their work done, etc., then I need to show up to meetings on time, have my work done, be prepared, etc. I think, sometimes, teachers can be the worst "students." I was just recently at a training for a new learning management system that my school will be implementing this year, and I was extremely frustrated by the number of teachers carrying on conversations and being completely disrespectful to the teacher who was leading the training. I kept thinking that none of the teachers talking would ever put up with that same behavior in their classrooms. I don't mean to come across as "holier than thou" because I have had some days where I goofed/had a human moment and wasn't prepared or was late to a meeting, so I completely understand that we all have slips, but I do think it is important to model and adhere to the same expectations we have for our students. In fact, I think that it's interesting when students point this out about other teachers - he/she isn't prepared; he/she is late, etc. It goes a long way with students when we model and demonstrate behaviors that are important for life and any job capacity. I also believe it is extremely important to scaffold material for our students so that they can then become more independent in their own learning.

    In my school, the administrators and teachers do a pretty good job of modeling and working together. While it is true that perfection doesn't exist, many of my colleagues try very hard to work together and connect to each other and the community. There are certain individuals or departments where this particular area could improve, but, overall, I appreciate the efforts made within our school and look forward to more instances of this happening in my time there.

    The way that I am modeling connectedness to my students and fellow teachers is by utilizing the suggestions in this book. I have become more active on Twitter and just participated in my third Twitter chat to date. I am really trying to share articles, ideas, etc. with my colleagues and want to really improve my connectedness with my students this coming school year. It is hard at times not to feel overwhelmed, as well as try to maintain the balance between work, family, and personal time, but without this book, I wouldn't have been as far as I am this summer. Each chapter has pushed me and helped me step out of my comfort zone, which is always good!

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  46. Modeling behaviors is best for students and having them model for each other by pointing out their positive influences on classmates. I am not the most adept at social media and would like to be better. I know that students even in the classroom spend more time on social media than tuning into the classroom lessons. Learning to tie the two together would be a big success in keeping students involved and on task.

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    1. You talk about having students model for each other - have them model proper social media for each other! Or for you! Have them teach you - it's something they are passionate about, would enjoy doing, and they could even figure out how to connect it to the content you teach.

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  47. I have been working to get out of my comfort zone so the Take 5 - Risk taking really hit home. I am currently working on a Teacher Creativity Grant from the Lilly Foundation and I am part of the pool of candidates for the IDOE and Pearson work on standardized test development. I have a goal this year to push the boundaries represented by the four walls of my classroom and being a connected educator meets that goal in so many different ways.

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  48. I truly believe modeling is one of the greatest teaching strategies. We must model for our students what we expect if we want them to understand. I try and model everything, but I believe the area I model the most is in writing. Whether it be how to write a constructed response using the YES MA'AM technique, sequencing techniques, revising vs. editing. I model all of this for my students. This year I even plan to blog with my students so that they can see how long it takes/how I truly do hit every step of the writing process/how much thinking goes into a blog post.

    In terms of modeling being connected, I do so through having my own professional Twitter separate from that of my personal. Students can see how I handle myself with colleagues, what I RT and favorite, etc. Sometimes I even pull up my personal Twitter/Instagram so that my students can see that I am not hiding anything from them. It's not like I am making my personal things private because I go against everything I preach to them, it is more so that I can keep my personal and professional lives separate. I love the part of this chapter where it discusses #stuvoice and I am contemplating having my students be required to participate at least once each trimester. Before that, however, one of my lovely PLN, Miss Chantell (who is a part of this), gave me the idea to encourage my students to have both a personal and professional Twitter, so I am hoping to discuss that with students at the beginning of the year as well.

    I really enjoyed this chapter, and it gave me a lot to think about for this upcoming school year.

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  49. Wow! Another GREAT chapter. I have so enjoyed this book! Good Choice!

    I absolutely love the opening quote: "Who you are speaks so loudly I can't hear what you are saying." by Ralph Waldo Emerson This is so true! We have to be so mindful of our actions and our words. We are setting examples every where we go. Little ones see and feel more than they hear.

    I think the wording for each section was/is so intentional! How we respond is our choice. How we inspire is our choice. How we collaborate is our choice. I so agree…how we get through our day IS OUR CHOICE. I choose the positive! I hope you will too.

    Looking forward to a GREAT year of choice and modeling.

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    1. I completely agree that our actions and words are watched and copied by our students every day. When we are understanding, open-minded and tolerant - they will be too.

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  50. This makes me think of the saying: monkey see – monkey do! Modeling is important with EVERYTHING. I try to do it in my classroom with the assignments I assign, however, I didn’t really think about modeling when it came to technology such as twitter, blogging, etc.

    I really liked the message involving empowerment, voice, and ownership through your modeling and through your P2LN! I mostly saw Twitter as a burden or yet again another responsibility that I have to attend to. I didn’t really see it as an empowerment tool that gives me endless resources, support, and a venue to celebrate with others. It’s a new but neat idea…

    The idea of promoting learning and not punishment is interesting… taking away technology is sometimes warranted in my opinion, especially when it puts other students at risk.

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  51. Modeling is everything. Monkey see, monkey do. My students cannot use cell phones in class so I do not use my cell phone in class. If kids need to text parents for a ride or something important, they know they can ask me and I will allow this. I am not afraid of technology, but sometimes I feel it is exhausting. I have a new ENO board that I need to learn and our school is transitioning to google drive storage so I have lots to learn for the fall. Luckily, I attended an elearning conference in town that was awesome. One of the presentations covered Twitter so I feel a little more confident that I will actually use Twitter outside of this book group. I need to find some way to grow as a math teacher this next year and I believe Twitter can help me do this. I am glad that I feel so positive with school beginning next week!

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    1. I just told my principal I think I want to start weekly Twitter chats for our teachers.....I might have been feeling too ambitious that day! Hopefully it will work out!

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  52. In my school I see first and foremost that our principal models how he feels his teachers should behave and communicate. He is very approachable, very open-minded and very trusting of our efforts and decisions. I like this approach and copy those actions and beliefs in my classroom as often as possible. I can say that I usually get a great response from the students because of my actions. They are typically more approachable about assignments, jobs and group work. They are more tolerant of their education because they see that mind set portrayed on a daily basis. I believe our school system, however, needs to model a more technology based communication system and fully embrace its uses and benefits as a whole. We are not very concerned as a whole about adopting a network within the school or community. This may be because our internet system has always been a road block in our daily work load, let alone a professional communication network. I really think my fellow teachers would love more of a constant relationship with the outside educational world in order to approach professional development on a daily basis rather than at times only offered by administration.

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  53. Modeling is such an important component of teaching. I think it's a component that sometimes is forgotten in the hustle and bustle. We are always modeling to our students, whether it's how to respond to a behavior situation, how to respond to the unexpected, etc. Many of my students do not have manners that they need to act appropriately in the school setting, so I have to model those as well.

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  54. Modeling is critical in primary! Modeling and gradual release of responsibility to do it on their own is the best way to get the end result intended! I have always placed a big emphasis on social skills as many of my students do not have the best home models. Students must be exposed to positive relationships with adults and students in order to foster their social development. In primary it is as important as teaching them their foundational standards for learning!

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    1. Our primary teachers struggle to integrate technology because they fear what might happen when the kids try. They assume the worst, and so does our IT department! But, what they need to understand is sooner or later these kids will have access to technology. We can't avoid it forever. If we want them to be prepared we must introduce it to them early and show them the correct ways of using it!

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  55. I model connectedness by my willingness to try new things each school year. We are steeped in this culture anyway in my district since we're a 1:1 building. I have added Pinterest, Facebook, Podcasting, Edmodo, Twitter, and I look forward to adding a Blog page for my students this year. I model connected relationships with students as well, and I do feel this is a strength for me even though technology doesn't come easily to me. I am outgoing with students, and they forgive my tech mistakes.

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    1. Mine fix my tech mistakes for me....tables turn and I am the student, they are the teacher. :-)

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  56. Modeling POSITIVE connectedness is a critical skill we need to show our students. I see so much nonsense they post on their Facebook pages it sickens me. They have no idea how this might come back to hurt them later. I think by modeling safe connections and talking to our students about it we are teaching digital citizenships that parents might not have the opportunity to teach. So much of social media posting and chatting occurs behind closed bedroom doors and with very little talk to their parents. BUT in our classrooms they talk to their classmates about it, we need to be aware of these conversations and have an ear out to intervene if necessary. We can just model, model, model what is right either by demonstrating proper connectivity in our classroom. Or having these tough conversations with kids when we see the need to step up. Sometimes it just takes one comment to turn them around!

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  57. I believe that modelling positive connectedness is extremely important! It is important to show my colleagues who are against posting anything online that there are ways to present yourself positively through social media. The perception is that all social media is bad and that is not the case. It is completely dependent upon what you choose to put on social media. I also model positive connectedness to my students through Twitter. I make it very clear to my students that what we put on Twitter is public and we want to always sound as intelligent as we are. I physically type what we tweet, but they create the tweet and proofread it too. The hope is that by the end of 1st grade they see the importance and carry it with them throughout life!

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  58. This chapter is so important for all educators and everyone that works in a school culture to read! As teachers, we are expected to value and model respect towards one another. However, do we show that same respect to all staff that works with us?? The lunch staff, custodians, front office secretaries, parents from PTO, and anyone else that works alongside you should deserve the same respect as anyone else in that school. We need to model the same to our students. If the students can suspect that we don't believe in them or trust them, they will perform to their highest ability.

    Principals need to be the leaders of modeling in a school. Students and teachers want leaders who pay attention to them and who genuinely care about them. They want more than just told what to do and how to teach in the classroom. We should all be on equal ground in this profession and model the kind of behavior that good teachers, parents, and students deserve.

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