Monday, March 10, 2014

Invent to Learn Week 7: Student Leadership and Make Your Own Maker Day

I was glad to get to chapter 10 because I feel like the focus of our discussions has been on the teachers. How do you see students being leaders in your classroom and, ideally, in your maker classroom? After reading chapter 11, I want to go to a Maker Day! I can see a Maker Day as being a great way to introduce parents (and community members) to a move to making in your classroom or school. What do you think of sharing this with your school community? If you hear of any Maker Days or maker activities, please let this group know.

For next week, read chapters 12 and 13, "Making the Case" and "Do Unto Others."

7 comments:

  1. I think having a "Maker Day" is a fantastic and doable idea! Our elementary school have several evening events hosted by our PTA throughout the year (ex- "Bingo for Books," "Family Math Night," etc). I think a "Maker Day" type event would fit right in! I'm so glad that these chapters went into such detail as to provide us with such concrete and applicable information!

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  2. I love the idea of a Maker Day, but I think I am far from ready. I would like to attend some first and have the experience of lots of projects done by our students first. The project ideas at the end of the chapter are very helpful for planning projects. I too, would love to see if anyone has any Maker Day plans. I would also love to visit anyone who has already set up a maker program/room at your school.

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  3. I really want to make this happen. My Genius Hour is a step in the right direction. However, I really want to develop a space for it to be done right. I'm going to be teaching an interactive media class next year- I see this as an opportunity to develop a new space and work towards a Maker Space. We have a great recycling program in Plymouth- where anyone can take anything for free... there are also all kinds of tinkering "stuff!" I would love to visit a school and see Maker Spaces in action in order to get a clear visual. I'm loving this book... so many ideas...as usual- my head is spinning.

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  4. Since the reading chapters 8 and 9, I have been shopping for stuff to put in my cabinets at school to have available for the students to complete future projects. After reading 10 and 11 I am now ready to add some more projects into my classroom. I love the idea of the Glow Doodle site and am experimenting with ways to add it into my English curriculum. I am very uncertain about the role of student leadership at this stage of my professional development into the maker movement. This is an area in which I will have to do more exploration in order to feel comfortable.

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  5. Our school has a great Science Olympiad Club (thanks to Lesley Mackey) and I can see these students embracing the idea of being leaders of a "maker movement". It would be great to see these students lead other students in a school wide maker day. I loved going to all of the websites listed in the "maker day project idea" section. The LED throwies and Glow Doodle are among my favorite. Giving students opportunities like these would surely expose "making" as exciting and irresistable.

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  6. Our school is definitely weak in leadership. In recent years, I see few true, dedicated leaders. I am hoping the newly established “Friday Activity Period” at our school will help in leadership. I am far enough along in my career that I would not attempt “Maker Day” on my own. In the past our Health Fair/Activity Day did provide some of these create activities in a short class for one day. I encourage my students to move beyond school activities of sports and music and get involved in 4-H programs, Charley Creek or Honeywell Foundation Arts Programs etc.. I hope upon retirement to help with some of these programs. I firmly believe we need leaders of the next generation and we need to take an active part in building these leaders

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  7. Reading Chapters 10 and 11 were exciting. These chapters reminded me of the activities that regularly take place in organizations like 4-H, Girl Scouts, Boy Scouts, Junior Achievement, etc. The "learn by doing" theme is prevalent in these groups, so why have many teachers gotten away from the idea in their own classrooms? I think testing and current teacher evaluation processes make teachers nervous to have "Maker Days" such as the ones described in Chapter 11. As a first step, I am trying to adjust my attitude. I am trying to have a more light-hearted and fun attitude about the work I ask my students to do. I will then try to incorporate more projects into my curriculum. Teachers need to ask themselves, "What is the goal?" We sometimes forget that the classes that are fun are the classes where students are given the freedom to be more creative. This, in turn, leads to learning, which is my goal. I need to be less structured sometimes. This is hard to let go of when "Purposeful Planning" is one area of my teacher evaluation! Projects need to be carefully thought-out by the teacher, but the implementation can involve the students more than I have been doing.

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