Monday, September 30, 2013

Teach Like a PIRATE Week 3: Rapport and Ask and Analyze

Welcome to week 3. I hope you are enjoying the book as much as I am. This week we read the chapters "Rapport" and "Ask and Analyze." Did anyone else laugh out loud while reading about Dave's first days of school? I would love to be a fly on the wall in his classroom! Do you have any first day(s) of school practices that you use to connect with your students? Have you found it makes a difference later in the school year when you make an effort to connect with your students early in the school year? And what kinds of opportunities do you give your students to ask questions?

Next week we will read and discuss the chapters "Transformation" and "Enthusiasm."

31 comments:

  1. Reading this chapter reaffirmed things I already believe. I never do rules on Day 1-2. I believe the best about my students- 6th graders should already basically know how to behave at school by now. Day 1- each kid gets 2 bendy sticks (WikkiSticks or Bendaroos) to make into a shape that tells something about themselves. I walk around and work on learning names. Day 2- students randomly draw a # to put them into Surivor groups- got this idea from the book and found a Boy Scout activity online that I modified- kids compete for a Hershey bar. I walk around, work on names, and observe class dynamics. Day 3- payoff the candy bar winners (establishes that I keep my word and have integrity), talk about myself (by then most kids have decided my class is OK and are interested in my stories), and go over rules. I seem to get less rules each year- I'm down to 2 now. #1- Keep your Dear Teacher happy (if Momma ain't happy, no one is happy- a happy teacher is a happy class, I'm pretty easy going). #2- No meanness. I also promise that I won't be mean to THEM or any other adult in our building, nor will I talk about any other teacher in my class in a negative way. Then we have a sit-down serious chat about success: I pull up a chair in the middle of my room and have a heart-to-heart about what I will do to help them succeed in my class (almost anything). We talk about FAIL- First Attempt, I'm Still Learning- and redoing if they get an F on an assessment (after extra practice and help). Because I've delivered the 1st two days, rapport is set (with most kids- some are tougher to get to know) and they can trust me with their education. Like Dave Burgess says- BOOM- I've got them!

    Then the trick is to make a memory every day. The second chapter- I don't feel like I'm the most creative person in the world. But I have tried this year to make a memory- something new or different or connected or weird- every day. I rapped one day- kids spent half the period wondering why I was wearing my shades inside. They'll never forget how bad I was! And when I lack ideas, I ask my Twitter pals- my PLN saves me so many times! I also ask my kids what questions THEY have for the next lesson- a day or two ahead. This helps spark my creativity a lot too. We even take notes by asking questions- while watching a video or as a back-channel on Today's Meet. That helps students get curious. We practice questioning in fun ways- like PollEverywhere or Socrative or Quia Games- questions are normal in my class. I always let them email me any question, as long as it's school appropriate. And I'm going to start flipping my classroom with my advanced students, to get them to learn the "facts" more on their own so we can ask and answer questions (competive games, Socrative Seminars, projects, discussions) in class more.

    I love this book discussion- I get tons of great ideas from reading all of your posts. Thanks for being a part of this group- everyone in it. I've read the book twice on my own, but it's even better to go over it again with friends and fellow educators.

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    1. I'm with you on the not doing rules the first couple of days and having fewer of them. They get hammered with rules those first few days. I'm like you, I'd like to get to know them and let them get to know me the first couple of days to set the tone for the year. About day 3 I go over the few rules I have and introduce them to the PBL process. I also like your FAIL policy and acronym! My policy is very similar to yours.

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    2. Love your response and how you've modified the opening days in your own way. My PLN is a great source of inspiration for me, as well!!

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  2. As a teacher, I learned that the best investment you can make in your students is an investment in time in getting to know them. I used a simple online-form that they filled out to find out about them. I would later pull each of them aside for a 5-10 minute one-on-one conversation to just talk to them and learn about them as a person (using the online form as a guide). It would take about a month to get through all of my students. But the atmosphere in my class was always calm, constructive, and safe. I rarely had discipline issues. I believe this was the result of the time I took to invest in my students.

    As I read about days 1-3, I was reminded of the "motivational" talk I would give to students during the first few days of class. I told my students I would do things differently than most teachers as well, so it was refreshing to hear of another teacher doing the same. However, I was not nearly as engaging as the author. I was never able to quite sustain the enthusiasm of those first few days.

    I find it interesting that the focus of the first few days of school is to ignite mystery and enthusiasm, whereas you go to another "expert" or school-of-thought and the message is "practice routines and procedures" for the first few days. I see how easy it is for teachers to get frustrated by being pulled in several directions and not sure how to focus their energies.

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    1. That was my thought as I was reading this section. I recently attended a conference that was all about the importance of teaching procedures during the first few days of school. Even though I agree with the author's point about making the class engaging and exciting right away, I also think it's important for elementary teachers to explain basic procedures. Maybe teachers of older students are able to spend less time on this?

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    2. I agree- it's an elem vs. sec. thing. My hubby teaches 1st grade- he's all about procedures. In middle school, I'm much more flexible- less procedure to practice. So I can do it differently. But not all of my fellow middle school teachers feel that way. I just like to be different :-)

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    3. Very interesting observation about teachers being pulled in different directions. I agree. Give me mystery and enthusiasm any day of the week!! Duly noted that we all need to make adjustments for the age group we work with, however.

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  3. I have often felt that my first day of school practices need work. Our school policy dictates that we have to go over classroom rules, grading policies, and assign seating in the first week. On day two, the principal and assistant principal pulls the students out of classrooms for grade-level meetings. Our academic honors English classes have required summer reading and the English teachers of these classes are required to have some form of assessment of this requirement. I freely confess that I am guilty of getting this "boring" stuff out of the way so that I can establish a flow to the class and continue on without these interruptions.

    It may be that the nature of our small, rural community lends itself to this environment because we already know some of the students and their families before the individuals ever step into our classrooms. A good portion of the parents who I spoke to during our last parent-teacher conference days were former students of mine.

    This level of familiarity does have one good side to it. There are multiple ways that students can ask questions and they are comfortable doing so. A student in my class can ask a question in-class, on-line, before or after school, or by phone. I keep my phone number in the local county phone book and I make a point of giving my students permission to call me at home (I do ask that they keep it prior to 10:00 pm). The last call that I received was from two boys in my English 10 class who wanted me to know that they had rented and watched a movie that I had used as a reference during class that day. I think that this level of accessibility is one way to build positive working relationships with my students.

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    1. We generally have school rules and classroom policies to go over those first days as well. Needed but it does lack a little. However, one of the teachers created a powerpoint to use so instead of everyone in the class reading, she has them engaged in the power point. Makes it a lot more interesting to teach and to listen to. Students have a visual. I tried it this year and it was a lot more engaging for the students, plus I believe we got through the material faster. It also allowed time for discussions on everything presented. I was also able to get to my material faster.

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  4. I really appreciated the idea that there is no failure, only feedback. Sometimes I take students' lack of interest or their negative behavior too personally, when really I should use it to adjust what I am doing. I was also encouraged to know that it's okay to struggle when it comes to lesson planning and coming up with ideas. I sometimes have a hard time coming up with creative or engaging activities, and it's good to know that the level of engagement I want is attainable if I keep working to make lessons exciting learning experiences for my students.

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  5. I love this line: " Sometimes silliness is the norm." Finally, permission for how I do things in my room...often. During those first few days--I keep my OWN excitement level super high (which is easy because I am excited to teach them.) I make sure there is a smile on my face, and there is a lot of movement, fun, and excitement as I "teach" them about procedures and how our classroom will be an amazing place.

    After a few days I ask the kids if they have liked the excitement and fun, and I always get a resounding "YES!" I tell them, if we follow our procedures, my attitude, excitement and energy is a guarantee...it's when procedures start to not be followed, or I have to break from instruction that my smile may momentarily disappear...but I always want it there. This puts some positive pressure on them to do the right thing, because they like me to teach with enthusiasm...it's what makes learning great.

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  6. I had to chuckle through the chapters this time. My ideas always come at the spur of the moment. I visit conferences, classrooms and I am always trying to see how I can do that activity in my room but in my discipline.
    If I am bored with teaching anything then I can only imagine what my students are feeling. Therefore if I don't like what I am teaching then I change it so I like it. I am always looking for a better way to present new or even old materials. After all we are in an ever changing world.
    One of the first things I do on the first day with my general music students.....I give everyone an "A". Yes you heard. I give them an A and tell them it is up to them to keep it there or loose. Amazing the look on their faces. Some never get above a "C". Amazing how hard they will work to keep it up there. It is only with the general music classes that I do this with.
    My attention getter for my choirs becomes their favorite pop song and we start with that for our warm-up. They are ready to go. Then I go with the traditional warm-ups. It might be backwards but no one really wants to start with the traditional warm-ups and with the pop song they are up, music out and ready to go.

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  7. I am truly enjoying Teach Like a Pirate! I especially like when Dave mentioned in the text that if you do not already know your content and don’t have various techniques to draw from, that this book is not for you. I like that the book focuses on the delivery of the lesson. This book is very much designed for veteran teachers, which I am truly enjoying because it new, fresh and fun!
    Rapport is crucial for connecting with students and being able to effectively convey content. It is important for students to be able to buy into the idea that the teacher not only know the curriculum but is willing and makes a strong effort to connect with the student enough to know how to best deliver this information. I make it a habit to get to know my kids and their interests as well as create a comfortable environment for students to ask questions. I thank them with they ask questions and encourage others to follow suit. When a question is not particular a great question, I will take the question and rephrase and mold it to reach more of my audience. I have truly found that these strategies make a huge difference not only in my classroom culture but also in gains made by students.
    I am looking forward to finishing this book as well as participating in the DOE webinar, Teach Like a Pirate on Tuesday, October 22nd.

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  8. I started using PBL in my classroom last year, it has been a huge transformation in the way I teach and I am truly enjoying it. It is essential to the PBL process to build rapport with students and that they build rapport with one another. It has been an enjoyable experience getting to know my students and their interests. It creates an environment that they feel comfortable to fully participate in. It's fun to get to interact with students on this level. I have spent quite a bit of time at the beginning of the year trying to create this classroom culture and it definitely pays off in the long run! It makes for a much more enjoyable year. Students are more engaged and willing to participate. At the beginning of the year I let the students explore their own interests within my subject so they can find something they can be passionate about and then they share it with others.

    Group work is a central component of PBL and creating this culture early in the year helps groups run more smoothly. The use of essential questions has also been transformative in my teaching style. I really like how they help show students the "bigger picture." I have learned to help student snake connections rather than focusing on minute details they could "google" to find in a matter of seconds. I have really enjoyed this book so far and have been inspired to be more creative. I am always thinking of creative ways to "hook" students at the beginning of each PBL unit and set a purpose for learning. I like what he said about being creative...that it takes hard work to be creative. I'm looking forward to reading more.

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    1. *make* connections not snake connections....not sure how to snake connections, ha!

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    2. Please help me out, maybe I missed it. What is PBL?
      Thanks,

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    3. Kerri, PBL stands for Project Based Learning.

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  9. This book is so good! I kept thinking YES! I always hate hearing myself talk for two straight days at the beginning of the year about rules and procedures. I always try to make it a game for everyone to learn everyone's name as quickly as possible. They usually know each other before I do because many of them have gone to school together for a while. I guess I should say I teach fourth grader students and we have two sections per grade level. I think it is so important to build rapport with my students and I try to add humor as much as possible. I hope this makes me students feel comfortable in my room. At the beginning of each day I take a few minutes and they can share if something super good, super bad, super anything happened. This kind of gives me a quick insight if something has happened like a dog died, that may help me know what's going on with a particular student. It's also a good time to appreciate the things kids do outside of school, like a win at a game.

    The next chapter about asking questions was interesting. I know that too many times kids get caught up in wanting to know the right answer and sometimes there is no "right" answer to open ended questions. I try to take their questions a step further. I can always see that some are with me and some are lost... We were talking about the revolutionary war and I try to put it in terms they can understand. Like how would you feel if someone was telling you what to do and you had no say in the matter. I am looking forward to reading the rest of this book!

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  10. When I was a teacher, I remember trying different things every year at the beginning of the year to build rapport and community in my classroom. I found activities online and created my own getting to know you ideas, too. I tried to allow the students to get to know me as a person so that they felt comfortable allowing me to get to know them and so that they would share their interests and be comfortable in my classroom. As Dave experienced, I was amazed one year when my students didn't know each other, and that made me rethink what I was doing and how much I needed to help the students build group dynamics and learn what it means to be a team. I remember classroom climate and community being really valued at the middle school level, but when I had the opportunity to teach high school, the focus seemed to be more on getting in the content as soon as possible. I remember feeling childish and out-of-touch when I wanted to do getting to know you activities and my partner teacher reacted like I had no idea what I was doing because he wanted to just do the syllabus and start teaching that first day.
    As a technology integration specialist, I get to be in many different classes and see the dynamics that have been established. When trying new lessons and activities with technology and with modern curriculum models, positive rapport in the classroom is so important. I myself work to build rapport with the teachers so that they trust me and they are willing to take risks with their students.
    Establishing a positive classroom climate at the beginning of the school year makes all the difference for the remainder of the year. I have heard of teachers not touching content for weeks because they spend time creating a family within their classes. Once that is established, learning content and working together go much more smoothly than if teachers are rigid and don't form that culture in their classes.
    I tried to encourage my students to ask questions as much as possible, and much of the time, I would have them answer each other instead of me always giving the answers. At the middle school level, students are not always comfortable asking questions, but again, this goes back to what kind of climate you have created in your classroom. Sometimes I would have students write questions as exit tickets or ask a partner instead of doing it in front of the whole class. My students learned that I don't expect 100% understanding the first time something is taught, but also that I couldn't read their minds so they needed to be comfortable speaking up.

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  11. As I read these chapters, it occurred to me that the newly-announced Indiana TOY, Latin teacher Steve Perkins, seems to fit some of Dave's persona. It sounds like he too does a variety of activities that fully engage students.

    I really enjoyed the description of the first three days. I would love to be in that class! When I taught science, I did one of my favorite experiments on the very first day, a discrepant event, right before the bell rang to dismiss students. The best part was, I never told them the secret! To this day, I have students ask me, and I've never told. As they say, you never get a second chance to make a first impression. I loaded my first weeks with lots of fun experiments and demos to try to set the tone. Sure, we had days that eventually didn't include as much excitement, but one of the advantages of being a "seasoned" (yeah, old) teacher is that you can build up your repertoire of what you know does and doesn't work. You do still need to adapt to meet the needs of your students, because from year to year and class period to class period they can differ greatly.

    I really enjoyed the part about working to become a creative teacher, not just assuming that you are or you aren't. I learned a lot about creativity from a math teacher on my team. Until I met her, I thought math class was more or less a spectator sport: the teacher lectured, you did problems. She had so many hands-on ways to teach math (ex: Star Wars fraction puppet shows) that I was very inspired. I get some of my best ideas in the shower or in the car, because I don't have so many other distractions.

    In many cases, I think it is simply a question of time; you need to make the time to really think about a lesson and the best way to deliver it. In this day and age with so many materials available to us electronically, we also need to make the time to find many great examples that are already out there, and make them our own. If we still have questions and we have a good PLN, we can tap their expertise, too. Our PLN can also keep inspiring us to be more like a pirate if the other adults around us aren't as enthused.

    I do need to give students more chances to ask questions, but, as a media specialists, I do get a lot of questions; it's part of my job to answer them! One of the great things about being a school library media specialist is that you have a different type of relationship with kids; they know (hopefully) that you are there to support them and you are not grading them. I have many opportunities to have one-on-one conversations with students.

    When Burgess mentioned that he thought many of the best motivational books he's read have been outside the education realm, that reminded me of some books and speakers that have inspired me. Jim Collins of From Good to Great spoke at a NMSA (now AMLE) conference. Some said, "What has he got to do with education?" and when it was over, said what a great speaker he was. I think often about some of Gladwell's books and others.

    Looking forward to seeing many of you at ICE this week!

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    1. I also have several activites that I perform only once for each class. The first time is the attention getting, the let's do this again, and the WOW factor. However, I just smile and say "Maybe when we get a little more time." The second time around the WOW factor is not as cool because they are waiting for it instead of holding on to the suspense.

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  12. The "rapport" section has been my favorite-so far! Classroom misbehavior does indeed reflect a lack of engagement. The more students feel the presentation of learning is connected to them, the higher the level of learning that takes place. Connection does not only come when students identify with the topics at hand. It occurs when dedicated educators take the time to understand that our students are not young people "practicing" for life ahead. Rather, they are individuals having a life experience NOW. It is incumbent upon teachers to capitalize on the now, and to generate a "buy-in" for a lifetime of learning.

    Students, teachers, parents, and the school community where I teach (and our children attend) believed our building's atmosphere needed improvement. So, our staff researched and "adopted" PBIS. We are dedicated to making this change, and we strive to be diligent in our efforts to be positive! Dave's MANY references to front loading within these two sections reminds me that our efforts WILL pay dividends. (After 8 weeks, we think it already is!)

    I loved reading about Dave using WBT (p.24). As part of our PBIS efforts, we decided to increase the number of staff members using WBT. Taking emotion out of classroom management has been a key to our climate change. Our Kindergarten student has latched on whole-heartedly to WBT. As a parent, it is quite entertaining to hear him recite the classroom rules, as an educator, it is extremely rewarding.

    Looking forward to reading more......

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    1. I confess: I can't find WBT on page 24. I'd also like to hear your ideas on how your school is implementing PBIS without having too much emphasis on rewards.

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  13. Well, so far these two chapters have confirmed the positive instructional/ teaching methods and techniques I currently use. Two years ago a student, because of behavior problems, was transferred from going to school in a public high school to attending school in his place of residence where I became his teacher. Long story short, this change in his educational services continues to be a success in spite of all our preconceived notions. His success comes from the author's belief, "So what compels these "trouble makers" to behave in my class? First and foremost, I believe it's because they are engaged."

    The questions asked of us to comment on don't fit my current teaching situation. Except for the above student, the rest of the students have severe cognitive and medical disabilities. This makes developing a rapport between the students and me instrumental. If I didn't create a rapport with my students and create opportunities and activities where my students are engaged, they would just fall asleep. Bless their hearts, they don't look bored, they look asleep, because they are!!!

    The handout the author gave his students "Welcome to the World Famous Learning Extravaganza!" illustrated a wonderful creative way to describe his class. I'm going to find a way to osmosis this. Enjoyed these chapters even though the Bears are losing, but the Colts are winning.

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  14. I have really enjoyed reading everyone's comments this week. I know I'm late getting my two cents in, but it was a busy week! I have one request... I don't know what some of the acronyms stand for: PBL, WBT, BPIS... Sorry! It would be helpful to at least have the words written out the first time. Thanks!

    My favorite part of the book may be the quote by Charles Schwab on page 21: I have yet to find a man, however exalted his station, who did not do better work and put forth greater effort under a spirit of approval than under a spirit of criticism.

    That's true for students, and it's true for teachers! All the criticism of teachers today has made education worse, not better. Our former Superintendent of Public Instruction was looking forward to schools failing so he could take them over. That certainly did not help make Indiana's schools better, or help teachers be more successful.

    As to the Rapport chapter, I do believe in the power of rapport with students. I have taught for over 40 years, and I now have only two rules: 1. Show respect for your classmates. 2. Show respect for me. (In that order.) I tell them we have only one year together as a group, and we can't waste it on meanness. I also make sure I attend activities outside the classroom. Tonight is our first fifth grade basketball game. One of the first things I was asked this morning was if I was going to the game. Of course! I have on blue and gold today too, and there will be very little if any homework today because of the game. It's a big day for them!

    For the Ask and Analyze chapter, I loved the thought that when you're good at something (because you've worked hard to BE good), you make it look easy... So true! And I think the key to being a good teacher is reflection, so I agree: Failure is feedback! My feedback and reflection through the years have led to joy and success today. (Not that I still don't fail... I've not learned it all yet!)

    Loved these chapters!

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  15. I am a special needs teacher and i use different ways of building rapport with students depending on their abilities. I have the great ability to act silly and ham it up with the kids (maybe not to the extent portrayed in the book) but I am not afraid to look silly in front of students. I also like to keep up with pop culture and video games on a personal level, so I pull that in to conversations that I have with students. Kids who have never worked with me are often shocked when I overhear them talking about a game or other pop culture reference and interject a comment about it.

    I often have the luxury of keeping the same students for a few years in a row. This makes it easy for me to get and maintain rapport with students and parents alike. I work in a smaller school, and parents often know me outside of school and I let parents know that they can contact me via email, twitter, and phone calls.

    I am pretty flexible and easy-going. And my students realize that, so they know that I am always open to them asking questions in class and during lunch or recess. I try to make personal contact with my students each period to make sure that they understand tasks and see if they have any questions.

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  16. I have been enjoying the book also. I liked reading about how he does his first few days of school and uses play doh to learn more about the students in his class. I also like the idea of using the wiki sticks. This year I had the students in my bring three items from home (They had to fit inside a paper lunch bag.) to share with the class.

    I also work with special needs students and have the some of the same students as the previous year. I let the students know that they can ask questions. Also when we are doing something new or when they are to be working on something I ask them if they have any questions.

    I also appreciated reading “Creative ideas don’t come out of the blue; they come from engaging in the creative process that critical process starts when you ask the right types of questions and then actively seek the answers.” The more we look for ideas and build upon them; the more ideas we have in our tool box to use. I also enjoy reading what other teachers are doing and the creativity that they use in their classroom. Thanks for sharing! : )

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  17. I know I'm a little late on this one, but I have been keeping up with the book and I am loving it! I am always battling with myself at the beginning of a new school year about what my first days will look like. Administration gives a list of procedural items that we must go through during the first 3 days and I try to do my best to sprinkle them among activities that will help me to get to know the students and the students to get to know each other. I love to do some team building activities and am always looking for new ideas. Play-Doh is added to my list for next year! I have definitely found the time that I invest in getting to know my students pays off in the long run. I am feeling challenged now to make my classroom talked about among the students. I don't think that the lessons I am teaching are quite the "learning extravaganza" that they need to be. I want students to be excited to find out they are in my class at the beginning of a new school year.

    As far as questions go, I do feel that I have a very approachable personality and that my students feel comfortable asking questions when they have them, but I wonder now about another way to allow students to question. Maybe a question box, or Post-it note board? I bet the questions that they ask, will challenge me to ask myself the right questions.

    I really enjoyed reading the section "The Real Law of Attraction." I think my biggest struggle at this point in the school year is asking questions of quality. I tend to ask myself questions that will require less work, but that will also make my lessons and classroom feel as though they are missing something. I need the questions that I ask myself to demand more of my preparation and teaching. When all is said and done, I think I will be more satisfied.

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  18. I did get a good laugh out of Dave's first few days! I would love to see it in action myself! Teaching in a self-contained classroom in elementary, I would not get to reach as many students as Dave, but I can certainly make learning a whole lot more fun than I do now in my first few days!! New Goal!! Revamp the first few days of class and turn this into an exploration center vs a classroom!

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  19. I did get a good laugh out of Dave's first few days! I would love to see it in action myself! Teaching in a self-contained classroom in elementary, I would not get to reach as many students as Dave, but I can certainly make learning a whole lot more fun than I do now in my first few days!! New Goal!! Revamp the first few days of class and turn this into an exploration center vs a classroom!

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  20. I'm sure Dave makes instant memories with his students with his unorthodox methods. His personality reminds me of my dad's personality, and my dad is also named Dave! The chapter on rapport made me think about my teaching style. My administrators have commented that I have good rapport with students, . . . . but I don't always think so. I do much better with my Current Events class (grades 10-12) than with my English classes (9th grade). What is the difference? I think the way I approach the content makes the difference. I tend to focus more on the individuals in my Current Events class, and I have known most of these students for multiple years and they have been in my classes multiple years. With my English students, it is the first year I have them in one of my classes. And, I have to admit, in my rush to cover as much content as possible (and it never seems like enough in English class), I sometimes neglect to focus on the individual students as much as I should. This is an area that I believe I need to improve. When I know a student better, I am much better about making a personal connection and building rapport.

    My school's 1:1 laptops have revolutionized asking questions in my class. This is the second year my students have all had laptops, and it makes addressing questions easier. Students can ask questions in class, but now they can ask a question 24 hours a day, 7 days a week! Students can e-mail me, or post a question to other students and myself on our class Edmodo page. Even shy students seem comfortable with the laptops.

    I really enjoyed catanhistory's response. The FAIL acronym is great! I think you may have many teachers reading this site who will want to borrow it! At my school we are asked to go over rules the first two days of school. The longer I teach, the more quickly I can get this accomplished. I loved the idea of putting the rules on power point. It would be an efficient way of getting through the rules, and it would be fun to add pictures, and possibly music, to make it more engaging for the students. The pictures and music would also be an easy way for my students to get to know a little about me as well. I would rather have a handful of rules that are essential than a bunch of rules the students and I both tend to forget. A great future goal is to plan an activity for the first couple of days that get the students talking with one another. This is allow me to spend more time learning about the students Week #1. Thanks for the tip, Dave!

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