Tuesday, July 17, 2012

New Ways of Looking at Time on Task and Learning

I love the letter that Mr. Johnson wrote to his students after he yelled at them (pages 112 and 113). This shows a big shift in his thinking about the learning taking place in his classroom. He's come to realize that the idea of "time on task" has changed and also, as stated toward the end of the letter, "You [the students] have taught me that if students are excited about learning, they will end up working harder." Have you noticed a change in how you think of learning and time on task in your classroom since the introduction of technology into your classroom? Have you seen a shift in your students' attitude toward learning?

6 comments:

  1. The students I have worked with using different types of technology love it. They are more excited about doing the work when they are able to use technology. They also seem to be more creative when using technology then just using paper and pencil.

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  2. I have seen a big shift in the learning of my students. When technology is the key component, they are more active, stay on task better and appear to be very interested in what they are learning and/or producing. I try to vary the activities between them using technology, my use of technology in teaching the unit and the old fashion "read from the book." I don't like the "read from the book" units, so I don't know how they could enjoy it. I am not saying that we shouldn't continue teaching with that format but I do know that we can approach it so that the students are more involved with the learning process and not just a listening process. There is a time and place for those units. This summer, I have reshaped a few of the units to have more technology involved and to have the students responsible for the learning process.

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  3. Since I have "gone digital" in my classes, my students feel as if they have more control over their learning. The interactivity that technology allows gives students a chance to actively engage in an activity rather than being "fed" information passively.

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  4. I am not “digital” yet but then again am to a certain point. I teach Read 180 and the student are on computers and "on their own" for 20 minutes each day. I know it doesn't seem like a lot but letting go is interesting. I monitor them electronically but they control of their progress and they have created their own learning environment---they created a competition out of the lessons. Letting go and letting them is more of a challenge for me than the kids. It is great to see them run!

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  5. With the addition of more technology to student activities, I have seen changes in the process and the product. When students are given concrete expectations from their teachers, they tend to stay on task for longer periods if time. Many times I have seen students "zoning" out, but upon questioning, they explain some pretty complex thinking processes.

    By adding technology and giving a little freedom of choice of product, students never fail to amaze me with the creativity and complexity of the product. Some students will always be off task and sometimes the "I'll finish this at home" translates to "my Mom will finish this for me" but most times, our students step up and give us quality when we ask for it.

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  6. This is an informative blog. I highly appreciate your effort and time in writing this post.

    Education Connection

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