Monday, July 23, 2012

Creativity in Your Classroom

The last paragraph of chapter 7 on page 83 is all about creativity and, according to Kindle, contains the two most highlighted passages. Have you given your students the "freedom and autonomy" (page 83) to show creativity? Are you finding or allowing your students to find new and different ways to share what they have learned? Or is this something with which you are still struggling? Share your successes and your struggles.

4 comments:

  1. One of the biggest challenges to teachers is giving up the classroom control in ways that allow for student creativity while still moving in a productive educational direction. Many teachers see "creativity" as "chaos". Allowing students to "own" their learning many times requires the teacher to give up some of their tightly held control. Many years ago, I taught a project based Environmental Science class. While we had very limited technology, the students used other creative ways to design and implement their research. My job was to support and facilitate their ideas while making sure they were moving in the right direction. The class was the most successful class I ever taught, but it was also the most exhausting class I ever taught.

    With the addition of creative online processes and software, teachers will find the facilitation to be more challenging. They will need to let the students explore products that may be totally unfamiliar. Teachers will have to be willing to give up control and allow students to try (and sometimes fail) but ultimately the products from this freedom will be worth the discomfort. When students are given freedom and autonomy, they will take wing and creatively "fly".

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  2. I believe when the students are given the opportunity to explore and use their creativity on projects or assignments they work harder when they can express themselves. When assisting students on different projects where they were using technology to produce a project I was amazed at what they turned out when they had free reins so to speak. Also, what they taught me because they were more at ease exploring the programs and not afraid of making a mistake.

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  3. One of the rewards of teaching is to watch the students delve into a project to make it better than you thought possible. A reward to see a completed project from a student who never completes anything. Another reward, students who want to do more...just for fun. I have not been afraid to tell the students, "Hey, I don't know. Let me know when you figure it out." So many teachers are afraid to try something new for fear of a mistake or not knowing. Students can learn by teaching each other and I have found that with technology they are not afraid to ask.

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  4. Being a math teacher of 11 years, I've always struggled with "letting go" and allowing students to "roam free" by exploring scenarios and problems of their liking and interest. But one advantage of putting much of our coursework online has been allowing some autonomy in the rate at which students work and having them accomplish items on their own. I'm still a work in progress on how I'm running my class

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